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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Gripping, page turning and not at all disappointing to Rebus
This book grips your attention from the first couple of pages. You feel the cold Edinburgh weather as he looks over the Forth Road Bridge. You feel the hurt,confussion and betrayal that John Rebus feels as he uncovers the underhand dealings within local government,businessess, the prison service,local estate gangs and his own police department. This book is compelling...
Published on 7 Nov 2000

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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not the best but still pretty good
'Let it Bleed' is the seventh book in the Inspector John Rebus series, written by Ian Rankin and set it Edinburgh. The story begins with a high-speed car chase ending with the two teenagers in pursuit killing themselves. Then a few days later, a man who has been recently released from prison commits suicide in front of a councillor, who apparently has nothing to do with...
Published on 20 Sep 2007 by Dr Evil


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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not the best but still pretty good, 20 Sep 2007
By 
Dr Evil (England) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Let It Bleed (Paperback)
'Let it Bleed' is the seventh book in the Inspector John Rebus series, written by Ian Rankin and set it Edinburgh. The story begins with a high-speed car chase ending with the two teenagers in pursuit killing themselves. Then a few days later, a man who has been recently released from prison commits suicide in front of a councillor, who apparently has nothing to do with the victim at all. This takes Rebus onto an investigation into the corrupt world of Scottish politics and dodgy dealings.

I'm a big fan of Ian Rankin, especially his Inspector Rebus novels, and although 'Let it Bleed' isn't the best of the seventeen Rebus books (by a long shot), it is still a very enjoyable read and one that can be picked up and read fairly quickly. Anyone who has read a Rebus book before will be familiar with the gritty Edinburgh setting and Rebus's moody and agressive attitude and his obsessive behaviour towards his cases.

If it is your first time reading a Rankin/Rebus book, I perhaps wouldn't start with this one as it is a little slow and feels a bit like a series filler, but instead go with one of the best ones such as Knots & Crosses, Tooth & Nail, Black & Blue or Dead Souls. Still a very good read for fans of the series though.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Gripping, page turning and not at all disappointing to Rebus, 7 Nov 2000
By A Customer
This book grips your attention from the first couple of pages. You feel the cold Edinburgh weather as he looks over the Forth Road Bridge. You feel the hurt,confussion and betrayal that John Rebus feels as he uncovers the underhand dealings within local government,businessess, the prison service,local estate gangs and his own police department. This book is compelling reading. A knowledge of the local area can help bring the area to life, but Ian Rankin puts you in the middle of the housing estates which in essence could be any city.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Edinburgh's hard-drinking D.I. tackles the big bosses, 7 Jan 1999
By A Customer
Edinburgh's D.I. John Rebus is a hard-drinking policeman with a little bit of sympathy with the down-and-outs and a strong loathing for the big bosses. Beginning with a double-suicide of two youths who jump from the Firth of Forth Bridge Rebus gets a hunch that there is more behind it. Soon the fearless D.I. tackles about everybody: one of his colleagues, the DCC and men in even higher positions. The plot is quite good but the climate throughout the story is as frosty as in wintry Edinburgh: in the police offices, in the homes and everywhere. No book for aficionados of cozies.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sinister and Absorbing, 1 Oct 2004
By A Customer
With the seventh Inspector Rebus novel Ian Rankin has delivered a sinister and fascinating piece of writing. The book gives a rather cynical insight into the corruptions that can besiege the world of politics and the 'machine' of modern Scotland.
The story begins with Rebus and Frank Lauderdale involved in a high speed car chase across Edinburgh, culminating in a tense and inevitably tragic conclusion. When the two boys being pursued throw themselves off the Forth Road Bridge Rebus is deeply upset, and due to this we see Rebus in a new light, and we see the lonlieness, isolation and despair that he goes through.
After another suicide, Rebus delves into the world of the people involved and pieces together a political time-bomb, a case that could see respected people at the highest level of government implicated, and due to his enquiries faces losing his job. Despite all this, he is helped emotionally by his estranged daughter Sammy, and eventually the pair are brought closer together.
Ian Rankin has produced yet another fantastic tale, and gives a stunning insight into the political world and the troubles affecting Scotland today. Brilliant.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Well, we all need someone we can lean on . . ., 3 July 2000
By 
T. Barr (Coleraine, N. Ireland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
but for Stones loving, hard drinking Inspector Rebus there is a definite lack of any significant other. Dedication to his work, a maverick spirit and a burning need to uncover the truth in spite of all obstacles are what drive Rebus. This was, in fact, the first Rebus book I read and I was immediately enthralled by it - the writer conveys a wonderful if jaundiced sense of location and character. Do not read this unless you are prepared to become addicted to all the other Rebus novels.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 7 July 2014
This review is from: Let It Bleed (Paperback)
Great price.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant!, 20 May 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Let It Bleed (Kindle Edition)
Another excellent Rebus story. Second time reading this and still blown away by the mind of John Rebus. Rankin rocks!
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4.0 out of 5 stars Another well written book, 8 Feb 2014
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This review is from: Let It Bleed (Kindle Edition)
once again another well constructed story. keeping you thinking you know who and why, then he throws the spanner in the works and you are off in a different direction.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A complex and constantly moving story, 5 Feb 2014
By 
J. R. Johnson-Rollings (West Midlands, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Let It Bleed (Paperback)
The seventh Rebus mystery sees the Edinburgh detective investigating several suicides that seem disconnected, but which he has a hunch aren't as coincidental as his colleagues think. It unravels from there into a wide ranging and complex plot that feels a little too reminiscent of earlier books in the series.

It's almost certainly the story with the most different threads for Rebus to tie together, and this leads to a fascinating plot that keeps moving at a good pace - there wasn't time to pause and reflect almost before more scenes threw more clues my way. My copy has reading group discussion questions listed in the back, but I didn't feel like I'd been left an opportunity to even think about some of points they brought up as the plot rolled on.

The 'soap' aspects - ongoing character development - of the story felt rather more believable in this novel - perhaps because Rebus' relationships seemed more natural, unforced and his home life more in keeping with his character traits (and to be honest the traditions of the alcoholic single detective). I've come to quite enjoy seeing where his life will lead next in the same way I've enjoyed finding out how Adrian Mole's life has changed as new editions of his diary are published.

One of the best in the series up to this point, and certainly one that's encouraged me to hurry towards reading book eight.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Densely plotted and entralling, 23 Jan 2014
This review is from: Let It Bleed (Paperback)
I have never been into crime or detective fiction before but was drawn to this author because of his friendship with fellow Scot the hugely talented and late and much lamented singer Jackie Leven. I was not disappointed.

The plotlines interweave like a cat's cradle. The disparate scenarios are brilliantly drawn together, coalescing into a stunning whole. Never less than involving, this is unputdownable. Written in an easy style, with dialogue that crackles and fizzes with dark humour. Conversations sound authentic, each character with a distinctive voice. And one of the characters in Edinburgh itself, the constant background, whether it be the skuzzy estates, the narrow back streets or the splendid New Town.

Rhebus himself - semi-alcoholic,unhealthy, dishevelled, bitter, morbid, self-loathing,obsessional, selfish,a loose cannon, the bane of his superior officers, with a ton of agonising personal history and present woes on his shoulders - is a delight. A cliche perhaps? - more an archetype. Every character in the book is well drawn. We know these people , or someone like them.

This isn't glamorous police work -it is plodding, grueling. And real. People eat - often in grimy cafes - drink - a lot - sleep in their clothes, and - the running pun - try to bleed radiators.

In the intro the author says that his US publishers insisted o a final chapter to clear up the loose ends. I didnt mind the loose ends, but I would have liked that extra chapter because I didnt want the book to finish.

Quibbles ? You don't commit "harry-carry". And its "imply", not "infer". But how can you not like a book where squashed bodies lie on the mortuary slab looking like "hairy jam"
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Let It Bleed
Let It Bleed by Ian Rankin (Paperback - 7 Aug 2008)
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