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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Densely plotted and entralling
I have never been into crime or detective fiction before but was drawn to this author because of his friendship with fellow Scot the hugely talented and late and much lamented singer Jackie Leven. I was not disappointed.

The plotlines interweave like a cat's cradle. The disparate scenarios are brilliantly drawn together, coalescing into a stunning whole. Never...
Published 16 months ago by Captain Kirk

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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not the best but still pretty good
'Let it Bleed' is the seventh book in the Inspector John Rebus series, written by Ian Rankin and set it Edinburgh. The story begins with a high-speed car chase ending with the two teenagers in pursuit killing themselves. Then a few days later, a man who has been recently released from prison commits suicide in front of a councillor, who apparently has nothing to do with...
Published on 20 Sept. 2007 by Dr Evil


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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not the best but still pretty good, 20 Sept. 2007
By 
Dr Evil (England) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Let It Bleed (Paperback)
'Let it Bleed' is the seventh book in the Inspector John Rebus series, written by Ian Rankin and set it Edinburgh. The story begins with a high-speed car chase ending with the two teenagers in pursuit killing themselves. Then a few days later, a man who has been recently released from prison commits suicide in front of a councillor, who apparently has nothing to do with the victim at all. This takes Rebus onto an investigation into the corrupt world of Scottish politics and dodgy dealings.

I'm a big fan of Ian Rankin, especially his Inspector Rebus novels, and although 'Let it Bleed' isn't the best of the seventeen Rebus books (by a long shot), it is still a very enjoyable read and one that can be picked up and read fairly quickly. Anyone who has read a Rebus book before will be familiar with the gritty Edinburgh setting and Rebus's moody and agressive attitude and his obsessive behaviour towards his cases.

If it is your first time reading a Rankin/Rebus book, I perhaps wouldn't start with this one as it is a little slow and feels a bit like a series filler, but instead go with one of the best ones such as Knots & Crosses, Tooth & Nail, Black & Blue or Dead Souls. Still a very good read for fans of the series though.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Densely plotted and entralling, 23 Jan. 2014
This review is from: Let It Bleed (Paperback)
I have never been into crime or detective fiction before but was drawn to this author because of his friendship with fellow Scot the hugely talented and late and much lamented singer Jackie Leven. I was not disappointed.

The plotlines interweave like a cat's cradle. The disparate scenarios are brilliantly drawn together, coalescing into a stunning whole. Never less than involving, this is unputdownable. Written in an easy style, with dialogue that crackles and fizzes with dark humour. Conversations sound authentic, each character with a distinctive voice. And one of the characters in Edinburgh itself, the constant background, whether it be the skuzzy estates, the narrow back streets or the splendid New Town.

Rhebus himself - semi-alcoholic,unhealthy, dishevelled, bitter, morbid, self-loathing,obsessional, selfish,a loose cannon, the bane of his superior officers, with a ton of agonising personal history and present woes on his shoulders - is a delight. A cliche perhaps? - more an archetype. Every character in the book is well drawn. We know these people , or someone like them.

This isn't glamorous police work -it is plodding, grueling. And real. People eat - often in grimy cafes - drink - a lot - sleep in their clothes, and - the running pun - try to bleed radiators.

In the intro the author says that his US publishers insisted o a final chapter to clear up the loose ends. I didnt mind the loose ends, but I would have liked that extra chapter because I didnt want the book to finish.

Quibbles ? You don't commit "harry-carry". And its "imply", not "infer". But how can you not like a book where squashed bodies lie on the mortuary slab looking like "hairy jam"
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Edinburgh's hard-drinking D.I. tackles the big bosses, 7 Jan. 1999
By A Customer
Edinburgh's D.I. John Rebus is a hard-drinking policeman with a little bit of sympathy with the down-and-outs and a strong loathing for the big bosses. Beginning with a double-suicide of two youths who jump from the Firth of Forth Bridge Rebus gets a hunch that there is more behind it. Soon the fearless D.I. tackles about everybody: one of his colleagues, the DCC and men in even higher positions. The plot is quite good but the climate throughout the story is as frosty as in wintry Edinburgh: in the police offices, in the homes and everywhere. No book for aficionados of cozies.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Gripping, page turning and not at all disappointing to Rebus, 7 Nov. 2000
By A Customer
This book grips your attention from the first couple of pages. You feel the cold Edinburgh weather as he looks over the Forth Road Bridge. You feel the hurt,confussion and betrayal that John Rebus feels as he uncovers the underhand dealings within local government,businessess, the prison service,local estate gangs and his own police department. This book is compelling reading. A knowledge of the local area can help bring the area to life, but Ian Rankin puts you in the middle of the housing estates which in essence could be any city.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Another Good Rankin, 1 July 2013
By 
pphillips (Leeds England) - See all my reviews
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Let it Bleed is the seventh in the Inspector Rebus series written by Ian Rankin and during the course of this book Rankin tests his detective like never before.

During a cold Edinburgh winter Rebus is looking into the disappearance of the daughter of Lord Provost and at the start of the book he and his Chief Inspector are driving through the streets of the city in chase of a car that possibly contains the missing girl and her potential kidnapers. The fallout from this high speed chase will leave Rebus asking questions that he might not want the answers too....

This was a very good and very enjoyable book. Rankin manages to show both the relentless and single minded side of Rebus and the vulnerable and insecure side. His relationship with both Patience and Sammy are evolving and changing in front of us and it is at times, hard to not feel sorry for him as he struggles to be the father he knows he should be.

The book also sees the return Gill Templer. Fans of the series will remember her as his love interest and colleague in the first book, well times have changed and Gill is not just back...she is his boss. This was a masterstroke by Rankin. Rebus clearly still cares for Gill but she is now the establishment getting in the way of his one man investigation. The scenes with the two in are highlights of the book for me.

All in all I found this to be a very good book. It begins at a very fast pace with the car chase and the story that springs from this chase was both entertaining and gripping. The only thing keeping it from a full five stars was the volume of characters that Rankin creates and uses during the book. I at times struggled to keep up with who was who at had to use the search button a fair few times to remember the background of some of the people I was reading about.

Despite that minor quibble I still found this a very good and very enjoyable book to read. I would recommend this book to any fan of Ian Rankin or any fan of the crime genre in general.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A complex and constantly moving story, 5 Feb. 2014
By 
Jim J-R (West Sussex, UK) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Let It Bleed (Paperback)
The seventh Rebus mystery sees the Edinburgh detective investigating several suicides that seem disconnected, but which he has a hunch aren't as coincidental as his colleagues think. It unravels from there into a wide ranging and complex plot that feels a little too reminiscent of earlier books in the series.

It's almost certainly the story with the most different threads for Rebus to tie together, and this leads to a fascinating plot that keeps moving at a good pace - there wasn't time to pause and reflect almost before more scenes threw more clues my way. My copy has reading group discussion questions listed in the back, but I didn't feel like I'd been left an opportunity to even think about some of points they brought up as the plot rolled on.

The 'soap' aspects - ongoing character development - of the story felt rather more believable in this novel - perhaps because Rebus' relationships seemed more natural, unforced and his home life more in keeping with his character traits (and to be honest the traditions of the alcoholic single detective). I've come to quite enjoy seeing where his life will lead next in the same way I've enjoyed finding out how Adrian Mole's life has changed as new editions of his diary are published.

One of the best in the series up to this point, and certainly one that's encouraged me to hurry towards reading book eight.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sinister and Absorbing, 1 Oct. 2004
By A Customer
With the seventh Inspector Rebus novel Ian Rankin has delivered a sinister and fascinating piece of writing. The book gives a rather cynical insight into the corruptions that can besiege the world of politics and the 'machine' of modern Scotland.
The story begins with Rebus and Frank Lauderdale involved in a high speed car chase across Edinburgh, culminating in a tense and inevitably tragic conclusion. When the two boys being pursued throw themselves off the Forth Road Bridge Rebus is deeply upset, and due to this we see Rebus in a new light, and we see the lonlieness, isolation and despair that he goes through.
After another suicide, Rebus delves into the world of the people involved and pieces together a political time-bomb, a case that could see respected people at the highest level of government implicated, and due to his enquiries faces losing his job. Despite all this, he is helped emotionally by his estranged daughter Sammy, and eventually the pair are brought closer together.
Ian Rankin has produced yet another fantastic tale, and gives a stunning insight into the political world and the troubles affecting Scotland today. Brilliant.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Hooked me straight in and kept hold all the way through, 4 Mar. 2008
By 
Janie U (Kings Cliffe, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Let It Bleed (Paperback)
Rebus gets sadder and sadder but there are lots of witticisms and examples of dry humour throughout to keep you (and him) amused. That said, he seems a lot more open with his opinions than some of the previous books which makes for a better read.
There are many familiar Rebus characters in this story which helps to give the feeling of a pair of slippers - comfortable and you can't wait to get back to it.
There were also some great touches - I loved the constant references to the leaking radiator. Rebus's drinking partners in the pub are wonderful, they sit seperately (yet somehow together) but feel the need to ring the pub and apologise if they are not going to be there.
All through the book Rebus is asking himself questions, resolving them and then asking more which keeps the readers interest going and is very much like a real life situation, as opposed to a standard murder novel where there is a murder then it is solved at the end.
Talking of the ending I thought it worked really well with the story finishing without being resolved - again very "real world". The American version of the book had to have another chapter written to explain what happened next which I think would have made the ending artificial.
Not a classic novel but a really enjoyable one to be recommended.
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1.0 out of 5 stars pretty poor narration., 22 Sept. 2014
very disappointed with this. this audiobook was listedas being read by james mcpherson, but its not. samuel gillies is reading it and its awful. his pronunciation of scottish words is incorrect- "wee shug" is pronounced as "wee shoog"- terrible!!!! he has given dr curt a birmingham accent- disgraceful!!! finally, he is factually incorrect in that he calls the "crazy hose saloon" the "crazy horse saloon", which any ian rankin fan knows is WRONG. grrr!! waste of money- james mcpherson is the best fit for ian rankin. no question!
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4.0 out of 5 stars A Bit Mixed, 13 May 2012
By 
Mr. Ross Maynard (Glasgow, Scotland) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Let It Bleed (Paperback)
"Let it Bleed" started really well for me. I was intrigued by the suicide of the young men on the Forth Bridge, and by the later suicide, but I feel it loses pace and direction about half-way through and never really regains it. Corrupt politicians on the make is a fairly common theme in Rankin's books and this diluted the originality of the storyline. At the same time the ending is convoluted and overlong. So, a great beginning, but a slow second half and a drag of an ending. Nevertheless, a mixed Rankin still beats many crime novels from other authors.
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Let It Bleed
Let It Bleed by Ian Rankin (Paperback - 7 Aug. 2008)
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