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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Good, Well researched Medieval book
This was a good book and i can't wait to read the 2nd and 3rd books. The book was about a boy called Arthur who was 13. He is the son of the Lord of the Manor. His biggest wish is to become a squire to another lord. His friend Merlin gives him a Seeing Stone where he follows a story about another boy called Arthur (the classic Sword in the Stone story). The book was...
Published on 4 Aug 2001 by Sarah Evans

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3.0 out of 5 stars Well researched but slow story
`The Seeing Stone' is a children's novel, and as such, has extremely short chapters, sometimes only 1 page long in places. The way it is written is from Arthur's point of view, and the broken up chapters, that sometimes don't seem to link together, feel almost like diary entries. Although this book is set in 1199, the language used isn't old fashioned but there are...
Published 12 months ago by ramblingsofanelfpire


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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Good, Well researched Medieval book, 4 Aug 2001
This review is from: The Seeing Stone (Arthur) (Paperback)
This was a good book and i can't wait to read the 2nd and 3rd books. The book was about a boy called Arthur who was 13. He is the son of the Lord of the Manor. His biggest wish is to become a squire to another lord. His friend Merlin gives him a Seeing Stone where he follows a story about another boy called Arthur (the classic Sword in the Stone story). The book was written in the medieval period during the Crusades.It was obviously very well researched and i could relate to a lot of it as i studied the medieval period last year at school, in history. My only complaint would be that it was written in 100 short and i would say random chapters. I would have prefered, say, 50 longer chapters. It was a good book to get into on holiday.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It's great i was never bored!, 5 Nov 2001
This review is from: The Seeing Stone (Arthur) (Paperback)
This book was probably one of the best i have ever read. I couldn't put it down and read it astonishingly quickly. This novel is full of twist and turns and if like me you are thinking that it is for children, as an adult, i urge you to reconsider. For persons 8+ in my opinion.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best book I read last year (and I read plenty), 23 Sep 2002
This review is from: The Seeing Stone (Arthur) (Paperback)
Though as luminously vivid as a stained-glass painting or medieval tapestry, 'Arthur: The Seeing Stone' conjures up much more than a frozen window on time. It is alive and in constant motion: so much so that you can almost smell, touch and taste its tumultuous world. In an England poised for a new century but riven with religious conflict, political upheaval and feudal tension, Arthur begins a personal quest to find his true identity and the real applications of duty, justice and truth. In the course of Arthur's adventures and discovery of the mysterious Seeing Stone, Kevin Crossley-Holland reveals a rare talent for giving philosophical value to the everyday, and for playing seamlessly with the crucial link between past, present and future. Before reading 'Arthur' I had reservations about how relevant such a seemingly traditional book could be to today's readers, but I didn't bargain either for its wonderful sense of curiosity or for the sheer quality of its writing, which is elegant, witty, suggestive and attentive to detail. Nor can I recollect a scene in any book where questions about existence and meaning are cast as delicately as in the image of Arthur's mother burying her son Luke beside the tiny graves of his brothers Mark and Matthew, both dead in infancy before him. As modern in its appeal as it is genuinely historical in outlook, and always rich and astonishing, this book is proof of a master at work.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Legend of Arthur Lives On, 26 July 2001
By A Customer
I ordered this audio tape because the reader is Samuel West, but I found that it is thoroughly enjoyable for the story as well. You may think that this is another book in the same vein as "The Once and Future King" or "The Crystal Cave", both wonderful descriptions of Uther, Ygraine, Tintagel and Merlin, but Kevin Crossley-Holland has written an engaging and entertaining dual story line of two Arthurs. Both book and tape are notated as children's fiction but as a decidedly adult-kind of child I thoroughly enjoyed Mr. West's reading of Arthur's story. The almost 4 hours it takes to play the 2 tapes will fly by if you listen with earphones and close your eyes. It is easy to imagine that it is 1199 and that the young Arthur de Caldicot is entering exciting times in 13th century Cornwall. It may be worth noting that the audio book available in Canada is not narrated by Mr. West.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A highly recommended read., 18 Mar 2002
By A Customer
As a children's librarian I read many children's books. This book rates as highly as those of Philip Pulman. In my view It is one of those books that both adults and children will enjoy, especially if they have read The Sword in the Stone or The Once and Future King. A highly recommended read both for adults and children.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Absolutely brilliant!, 17 Aug 2006
By 
S. Nawrat (near london, uk) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Seeing Stone (Arthur) (Paperback)
This is one of the best books I have ever read. Due to the author's fantastic descriptions and vivid depictions of medieval manor life, you feel as if you have been temporarily absorbed into Arthur's world. It's a fascinating and very entertaining read.

Fortunately, the sequel is just as good but I did not like the third book as much (probably because I loved the whole medieval manor thing in the other two books, and because it features too many technical details about ships) but it's still worth a read.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent twist on a familiar tale., 6 Mar 2002
By A Customer
Most of us know the legend of King Arthur, but this book presents it in a new and exciting way. Intrigue and twists come at regular intervals in this story of Arthur de Caldecot and his efforts to become a squire, at any cost. It offers a clear insight into life in England at the time of knights, ladies, squires and peasants, and questions the feudal system through the eyes of a child.This book is addictive! We all loved it.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An unusual way to write but the best I've read for ages!, 23 Oct 2001
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E. Crew (Surrey, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Seeing Stone (Arthur) (Paperback)
I really enjoyed this book and would throughly reconmend it to any who enjoyed the Arthurian Legends. Keven writes in tiny chapters. He describes the the toughnest and sometimes unpleasentnest of medival life. I love the magic that runs throughout the book. It was a great read!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Arthurian Legend seen from the eyes of a 13-year-old boy, 13 Feb 2007
By 
S. Barnes (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Seeing Stone (Arthur) (Paperback)
Young Arthur, at the age of 13, in the year 1199, is given a beautiful obsidian stone by a man named Merlin. The boy Arthur lives a normal, if priveleged, existence as a page to his father on a wealthy manor in the Marches, just on the "England" side of the border with Wales. He lives together with his parents, his elder brother and younger sister, and he dreams of nothing other than one day becoming a Squire.

The stone seems perfectly normal at first, and then one day Arthur starts to see images in the stone and a story starts to emerge... a story featuring another young boy named Arthur!

The plot is really good, and with the awards that the book received, including winning the "Guardian Children's Fiction" prize, I was expecting it to be that good. However, I was quite disappointed to find that the text of this average-length book had been chopped up into a staggering 100 chapters, some just the length of a short paragraph!! I felt as though I literally "struggled" through to Chapter 33 as the text, for me, was lacking immediacy and flow!

I persevered, and my annoyance at the constant disruptions of thought faded as I was drawn into the lives or Arthur, his family, and their retainers, skilfully woven with the threads of Arthurian Legend. The book is built on solid foundations of well-researched historical evidence regarding the lives and customs of Britons at the turn of the thirteenth century. I now look forward to experiencing the rest of the Arthurian Legend through the eyes of young Arthur, in books two and three ("At the Crossing Places", and "King of the Middle March"). I only hope that the chapters become more substantial and terrible chapter headings such as "Mouthfuls of Air" (Lynne Truss would have a field day with this one!!) are avoided!

A good story - worth reading if you can persevere with the numerous chapters!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Sword in the Stone with a twist!, 23 July 2001
By A Customer
In Arthur the seeing stone you are transported to Medieval Times and you follow the story of Arthur de Caldicot who narrates his story in the book as a diary. He is just an ordianry boy who wants his father to let him be a squire for he desperatley wants to become a knight.
The 100 short chapters in this book also make it easy reading. I would definitley recommend this book.
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The Seeing Stone (Arthur)
The Seeing Stone (Arthur) by Kevin Crossley-Holland (Paperback - 1 Jun 2001)
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