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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "Memories are long in Ulster, and neither side has been willing to declare that the civil war is truly over."
Against the backdrop of the Good Friday Accords of 1998, this 1999 thriller explores several groups which have reason to want the peace process to fail so that they can accomplish their own agendas. Partisans of the Republic and partisans of the Union have come to an agreement regarding peace and power-sharing, but the new Ulster Freedom Brigade believes that all sides...
Published on 4 April 2008 by Mary Whipple

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Michael Osbourne
The "hero" is not Allon but Michael Osbourne.
The book deals with Irland.
It's not very interesting and follows the pattern of the previous Osbourn book "Tha mark of the assassin".
Probably because the war between catholics and protestant is something I really don't understand so I wasn't very interested. The plot that is repetitive and rather dull, but as...
Published 15 months ago by M. E. Mesquita


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Michael Osbourne, 17 May 2013
By 
M. E. Mesquita (Portugal) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
The "hero" is not Allon but Michael Osbourne.
The book deals with Irland.
It's not very interesting and follows the pattern of the previous Osbourn book "Tha mark of the assassin".
Probably because the war between catholics and protestant is something I really don't understand so I wasn't very interested. The plot that is repetitive and rather dull, but as I said the subject is not something very interesting to my point of view.
However some fault must lie with the book, as i thought that the film "Michael Collins" was very interesting.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "Memories are long in Ulster, and neither side has been willing to declare that the civil war is truly over.", 4 April 2008
By 
Mary Whipple (New England) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Marching Season (Paperback)
Against the backdrop of the Good Friday Accords of 1998, this 1999 thriller explores several groups which have reason to want the peace process to fail so that they can accomplish their own agendas. Partisans of the Republic and partisans of the Union have come to an agreement regarding peace and power-sharing, but the new Ulster Freedom Brigade believes that all sides have sold out, and they are willing to murder Catholics and Protestants alike as they continue the sectarian violence. At the same time an international group, the secret Society for International Development and Cooperation, consisting of powerful business and security officials from around the world, decides to use the uncertainties in Ulster to further their own business interests.

Michael Osbourne, formerly with the CIA, is lured out of retirement to promote the peace process and to guard his father-in-law, Douglas Cannon, who has just been appointed US ambassador to the Court of St. James. Osbourne has experienced personal danger, having escaped an assassination attempt the previous year, and he knows his way around Ireland. The Society, however, contacts the man who previously tried to kill him, a Russian known only as October, and hires him to stop Osbourne and the Ambassador and end the peace process.

Though the mystery associated with Ulster is exciting and filled with authentic detail, including some of the real characters associated with the Accords, the novel wanders into other, unrelated areas. The Society for International Development and Cooperation includes powerful and amoral renegades in high positions in the US, Israel, the UK, and other countries, and as the action shifts to Egypt, France, Greece, and other countries, the subplots shift the focus away from Ireland and into an international nether-world.

The staccato sentence structure, while effective for conveying action, gets wearisome here because there is so much action, not all of it related to Ireland, and Silva's descriptive abilities, so obvious in some of his other novels, are subordinated here to the action. One gets some insight into October and how he became the assassin he is, but Osbourne, while clever, remains somewhat indistinct from other thriller "heroes." This Silva novel lacks the unity and intense characterization one associates with the Gabriel Allon series, and Ari Shamron, Allon's mentorm is a sinister SIDC character here. Still, the novel is fun to read, a fast-paced thriller which does give some insights into the complexities of Ulster and the difficulties of the peace process. Mary Whipple
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4.0 out of 5 stars The marching season, 17 April 2014
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This review is from: The Marching Season (Paperback)
This was an interesting book which was difficult to put down. It kept me guessing to the end. Good quality and price. Would recommend it.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, 13 May 2013
By 
C. Rodrigues (Portugal) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Marching Season (Paperback)
Excellent. Well written thriller, well built and easy to follow story, even for someone whose native language is not English. Already bought some more books in English from this author to read in the future, most of them in second hand. In comparison, the Portuguese books are quite expensive.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great book, 16 Sep 2011
This review is from: The Marching Season (Paperback)
My wife brought me this book as an alternative read from my usual topics. It sat on the side for 2 months before I picked it up. How glad was I when I did...what a read, fantastic, it gripped me from the start and kept up the pace, right to the end. Fantastic, will try another book from this author.
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3.0 out of 5 stars The Marching Season, 31 Mar 2011
This review is from: The Marching Season (Paperback)
The story is well written and is interesting. In a story, the set spies/politics/terrorists is always a guarantee of a good story nowadays. The characters were reasonably defined - a bit more would not hurt - and the selection of places and historical events was interesting. The relation between characters was simple and direct, but this is a requirement is this type of novels. The pace of the story, the best of the book, was good, but a bit slow comparing to later similar novels, also from Silva.

I've already read the later books of Silva, and, because of that, I was interested in his initial books. 'The Unlikely Spy' is a must, but, in my opinion, the Micheal Osbourne series, although good and I recommend, are no more than a entrée to the Allon series, that are much better.

About the shopping process, it was a second hand book and the condition was poor. It was readable, but, in my opinion, not 'good', as advertised.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Silva succeeds again, 12 July 2010
This review is from: The Marching Season (Paperback)
An excellent, fast paced novel that constantly maintains the reader's interest. As usual, Silva's historical research is impeccable but he brings an educated, impartial, American perspective to the tortured history of Northern Ireland. He then very cleverly develops the plot to take in a much wider, international perspective. A great read.
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4.0 out of 5 stars it felt like i was there, 14 Jun 2010
By 
Arnsby Beverley (switzerland) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Marching Season (Paperback)
as someone who remembers the trobles of 69 in ireland this was a real insight.a good read
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4.0 out of 5 stars "Memories are long in Ulster, and neither side has been willing to declare that the civil war is truly over.", 17 Nov 2007
By 
Mary Whipple (New England) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Marching Season (Hardcover)
Against the backdrop of the Good Friday Accords of 1998, this 1999 thriller explores several groups which have reason to want the peace process to fail so that they can accomplish their own agendas. Partisans of the Republic and partisans of the Union have come to an agreement regarding peace and power-sharing, but the new Ulster Freedom Brigade believes that all sides have sold out, and they are willing to murder Catholics and Protestants alike as they continue the sectarian violence. At the same time an international group, the secret Society for International Development and Cooperation, consisting of powerful business and security officials from around the world, decides to use the uncertainties in Ulster to further their own business interests.

Michael Osbourne, formerly with the CIA, is lured out of retirement to promote the peace process and to guard his father-in-law, Douglas Cannon, who has just been appointed US ambassador to the Court of St. James. Osbourne has experienced personal danger, having escaped an assassination attempt the previous year, and he knows his way around Ireland. The Society, however, contacts the man who previously tried to kill him, a Russian known only as October, and hires him to stop Osbourne and the Ambassador and end the peace process.

Though the mystery associated with Ulster is exciting and filled with authentic detail, including some of the real characters associated with the Accords, the novel wanders into other, unrelated areas. The Society for International Development and Cooperation includes powerful and amoral renegades in high positions in the US, Israel, the UK, and other countries, and as the action shifts to Egypt, France, Greece, and other countries, the subplots shift the focus away from Ireland and into an international nether-world.

The staccato sentence structure, while effective for conveying action, gets wearisome here because there is so much action, not all of it related to Ireland, and Silva's descriptive abilities, so obvious in some of his other novels, are subordinated here to the action. One gets some insight into October and how he became the assassin he is, but Osbourne, while clever, remains somewhat indistinct from other thriller "heroes." This Silva novel lacks the unity and intense characterization one associates with the Gabriel Allon series, and Ari Shamron, Allon's mentorm is a sinister SIDC character here. Still, the novel is fun to read, a fast-paced thriller which does give some insights into the complexities of Ulster and the difficulties of the peace process. Mary Whipple
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not bad international crime thriller, 29 Aug 2001
This review is from: The Marching Season (Paperback)
This book reads as though the author can see the Hollywood blockbuster following shortly behind. It's the tale of a renegade Northern Irish Loyalist terrorist group aiming to bring down the "Peace Process", and an American diplomat-cum-spy and his family who become embroiled in the conflict. A little of Patriot Games, a little of Harry's Game, a little of Day of the Jackal, mix it all together and you get The Marching Season. Worth reading if you like all of the above, but don't expect it to be a best seller.
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The Marching Season
The Marching Season by Daniel Silva (Paperback - 1 Feb 2002)
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