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on 28 November 2012
excellent book with great genealogical tables and great bibliography. I will read this book again as I like the way information is well written and very informative. The one thing the book lacks is a series of maps. I think this is very important in a history book to set the scene and show where the placenames mentioned in the text are located.
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on 3 May 2016
Fabulous introduction into the life of this vastly under-rated Danish King who essentially established a unified and effective administrative English State. He also maintained peace throughout his eighteen year reign. A great feat when you consider the warring tribes and nations of the early eleventh century! Totally absorbing and thoroughly exhilaritng read!
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on 27 November 2015
So far I've only scanned the contents. I shall go into the book in depth shortly. I'm familiar with the history around Knut's coming originally with his father, Svein 'Forkbeard' through Gainsborough, accession to the throne of England and succession to his brother Harald. He was first and foremost a statesman, seen by his peers across Europe in the 11th Century as a man of vision. He also had his darker side, as when he had Ealdorman Eadric 'Streona' executed as a potential traitor - the man had vacillated between him and Eadmund - and as with sending the two young sons of Eadmund 'Ironside' to Sweden to be 'disposed of', and there is the question of how Jarl Ulf came to be slain in Roskilde Cathedral after the game of chess at the Yuletide in which Jarl Ulf accused him of cheating. I look forward to poring through this book with a fine toothcomb.
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on 3 August 2014
To me this book is too scholarly. It spends way to much Space in discussing the various sources and the differences between them - does for example Wiht in one cronicle and Wihtland in another mean the same place, and was that the Isle of Wight ? - and the opinions of various scolars on those sources. The actual story gets lost in all this scholarship. The book may be good in universities, but as casual reading it is not good.
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on 16 April 2015
Excellent
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