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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This brings together two totally incompatible concepts - joy and work
Another book by Scott Adams all about the joy of work - yes, you heard it "THE JOY OF WORK". About 250 pages on work, and nothing but work - from managing your boss (in itself an admirable objective), through laughing at the expense of others (another excellent pastime), to managing your co-worker (just you try, and see what I do to you!). In this book we wander from one...
Published on 28 Dec. 2006 by Bernard Smith

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1.0 out of 5 stars Scott, It's Just Not Funny!!
I'm a big fan of Dilbert and believe that Scott Adams is a genius for developing a comic strip that is geared to the white collar, never-going-to-be-an-executive world. His comic strips are generally hilarious and very accurate of the corporate world (even when he exaggerates). I'm a big fan of Scott Adams, the cartoonist.
However, I am rapidly starting to sour...
Published on 30 Nov. 1998


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This brings together two totally incompatible concepts - joy and work, 28 Dec. 2006
By 
Bernard Smith (Somewhere, Europe) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Another book by Scott Adams all about the joy of work - yes, you heard it "THE JOY OF WORK". About 250 pages on work, and nothing but work - from managing your boss (in itself an admirable objective), through laughing at the expense of others (another excellent pastime), to managing your co-worker (just you try, and see what I do to you!). In this book we wander from one strategy to another - from withhold information (everyone knows this), through boss deletion (I like it!!!!), to the sublime joys of sarcasm (otherwise know as common sense). This book is so true it is positively alien (Is he watching us all the time? Where are the cameras installed? He must have an army of little-Dilbert's reviewing all the footage?). For example, how does he know that bosses don't read their emails, or that bosses need to feel that they have "helped", or that everyone dreams of strategy 14 - how to turn you boss into a mindless zombie slave (let's face it, bosses come pre-packed as mindless zombies, so just adding the slave bit should not be that difficult). I refuse to comment on the chapter entitled the joys of work (as a matter of principle), but the chapter on managing your co-workers is a valuable contribution to our knowledge of modern business practices. Cubicle flatulence offered a new avenue of investigation for me, but dealing with irrational co-workers added little to my arsenal of techniques. The section on how to harness the power of your own incompetence was an eye opener; I had never thought to approach the problem by re-defining the meaning of corporate efficiency.

A person who can write more about office pranks (44 pages) then about "surviving meetings" (6 pages) is a must for any self-respecting middle management wallah. A must read for 20% of all Europeans, and 99% of all Americans (of those that can read of course).
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent insight but can be difficult to read, 29 Aug. 2001
By A Customer
Another marvellous offering from Scott Adams that has transformed my perception of hitherto dreary office life. Unfortunately the new style of this latest edition means that some of the longer cartoons can be a little difficult to read without some serious concentration.
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1.0 out of 5 stars Scott, It's Just Not Funny!!, 30 Nov. 1998
By A Customer
I'm a big fan of Dilbert and believe that Scott Adams is a genius for developing a comic strip that is geared to the white collar, never-going-to-be-an-executive world. His comic strips are generally hilarious and very accurate of the corporate world (even when he exaggerates). I'm a big fan of Scott Adams, the cartoonist.
However, I am rapidly starting to sour on Scott Adams, the author. His first book, The Dilbert Principle, was a masterpiece that gave humorous insight into the corporate world and the idiotic things that occur there. But his three succeeding books, including the most recent, The Joy of Work, are nothing more than Scott Adams' attempt to write book-length comedy routines that frankly aren't very funny. He provides unrealistic ways to deal with co-workers and, in this book, wastes a lot of time trying to tell you that in order to be funny, your attempt at humor must contain 2 of 6 elements. This chapter on humor, which is over 60 pages long (1/4th of the book) and goes on ad nauseum for just about every two element combination, is a total waste and is included only to make the book a reasonable length to make into a hardback and sell for $25 (adding about 100 Dilbert strips helps extend it as well).
I have seen this book already being sold in bookstores at 50% off. I wish I had waited.
I really wish Scott Adams would focus his energy on making cartoons that make us laugh instead of half-baked books that are about as interesting as say, a meeting with a pointy-haired boss.
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3.0 out of 5 stars There's Some Good Stuff, But a Lot of Fluff, 12 Oct. 1998
By A Customer
Scott Adams fourth Dilbert hardback book is not his best (the Dilbert Principle wins that one hands down). There are some very funny stories in the book, I was really howling at times. But there are times his humor misses the mark, such as his answer to Norman Solomon's anti-Dilbert book, which I thought came off as mean-spirited. Unfortunately, there are more misses than hits in this book.
Scott Adams has brought joy in the workplace over the past five years with his dead-on humor about the corporate business world. It has also brought him many financial opportunities, of which he has taken advantage. I say more power to him, I'd do the same. But I'm starting to wonder whether he should stop writing these full-length books and instead create some more comic books with strips that are outside of those that are published in papers. He's done this before and I think that is where he can entertain more people in the future.
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3.0 out of 5 stars First part great, lamely limps home, 25 Nov. 1998
By A Customer
Although at times I thought I had slipped into a parallel universe where Dave Barry draws Dilbert cartoons, (and would that be a bad thing?) the first part of the book is very very funny. It also continues to show how Mr. Adams really does know the dangers and humor that are an integral part of the modern corporate environment. Suddenly, (maybe to make the whole thing book length) the book swerves to cover territory like "How to be funny." Proving a time honored truism, "The analysis of humor is usually not funny." Supposedly the goal is to teach someone how to add humor to the work environment but that would be like my posting of a Dilbert cartoon on my wall making me a cartoonist. And the chapter on handling criticism is only there to give Mr. Adams to attack a book that no one I know gave any credibility to begin with. It does come across as mean and petty, but mostly just as unnecessary.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Getting a little tired. Sigh., 26 Nov. 1998
By A Customer
I live my life according to the Dilbert concepts. In fact, when I was a manager (I escaped and now live in a cube) my guiding light was to try to do things that the pointy-haired boss wouldn't do. I still wasn't successful, but that's another story.
I owe much to Scott Adams. However, I didn't enjoy this latest book. I sense that he's now using these books to simply vent and that he is going over material covered in other books. While I snorted and projectile laughed several times during the reading of this book, there were very LONG gaps between each mirthful episode.
Mr. Adams writes well and is humorous. But I fear that, at least with regard to his non-comic strip books, he may be in need of more inspiration. Perhaps he needs to get his job back at Pac Bell?
By the way, I am a proud member of the DNRC.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Funny and Useful, 21 Oct. 2003
By 
Not just funny and with a few cartoon strips thrown in, like all of Scott Adams books he actually manages to teach something about life as well by talking about the things he knows.
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1.0 out of 5 stars Old cartoons linked by self congratulatory text, 18 Feb. 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Dilbert: The Joy of Work (A Dilbert Book) (Hardcover)
I find Dilbert cartoons hilarious and the previous book "dogberts secret management" refreshing and fun. Unfortunately this book recycles the ideas and wraps them in condescending "let me explain the joke" diatribe. Sorry, but in comparison the the pure cartoons (dogbert's etiquete or refuge from the cubicle police, for example) this is a big let down. The email practical jokes, apart from a classic few, are weak and, for me the closing "the downside of being famous" summarises the mood and tone of this book.
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2.0 out of 5 stars A disappointed follow up to the Dilbert Principle/Future, 23 Oct. 1998
By A Customer
I am an ardent Dilbert fan, however I found this book full of cartoons that I had already seen and the writing was not as witty and incisive as the earlier books. I just didn't find myself thinking 'this is really true or this is really funny' as before.
Since Scott Adams has been at home relying on Email from others for inspiration, his originality and insights into office life are very much less than before. He needs to explore new angles (like International differences) to keep his material fresh.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing follow up to the Dilbert Principle/Future, 23 Oct. 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Dilbert: The Joy of Work (A Dilbert Book) (Hardcover)
I am an ardent Dilbert fan, however I found this book full of cartoons that I had already seen and the writing was not as witty and incisive as the earlier books. I just didn't find myself thinking 'this is really true or this is really funny' as before.
Since Scott Adams has been at home relying on Email from others for inspiration, his originality and insights into office life are very much less than before. He needs to explore new angles (like International differences) to keep his material fresh.
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Dilbert: The Joy of Work (A Dilbert Book)
Dilbert: The Joy of Work (A Dilbert Book) by Scott Adams (Hardcover - 23 Oct. 1998)
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