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20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A great first novel
This is a an excellent read-highly recommended. Like Grisham, Giminez clearly has a very poor opinion of lawyers and the American legal system.
Scott Fenney is a corporate lawyer who is in it to make money. He makes the mistake of giving an idealistic speech to a group of lawyers. While he does not mean what he says an experienced judge hears him and appoints him to...
Published on 10 Aug 2007 by John

versus
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good material, but rather unconvincing
Fenney is a high-flying partner of a leading Dallas law firm. Despite joining the legal profession to become another Atticus Finch (of To Kill the Mockingbird), Fenney quickly abandons principles for money. By overcharging rich clients, he enjoys a lavish lifestyle in the exclusive Highland Park neighbourhood. It seems as though nothing could dampen his success...
Published on 15 Feb 2010 by ceriithomas


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20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A great first novel, 10 Aug 2007
By 
This review is from: The Colour Of Law (Paperback)
This is a an excellent read-highly recommended. Like Grisham, Giminez clearly has a very poor opinion of lawyers and the American legal system.
Scott Fenney is a corporate lawyer who is in it to make money. He makes the mistake of giving an idealistic speech to a group of lawyers. While he does not mean what he says an experienced judge hears him and appoints him to defend a black heroin addicted prostitute who is accused of murdering the son of the Texan senator. The senator is likely to be the next president of America. The first third of the book paints Scott in a very poor light as he wheels and deals, makes money for himself and his firm. He tries to wriggle out of defending the prostitute by getting Bobby his best buddy from law school who is a struggling street lawyer to take his place. Gradually Bobby, Scott's daughter and the daughter of the accused win Scott round and he agrees to take the case.
All the might of corporate America is then brought to bear on Scott and he loses everything.
The book is full of cliches and might not be everyones cup of tea. Would a corporate lawyer take or indeed be qualified to defend someone accused of murder? Gimenez goes on a bit too much about the vagaries of lawyers. He does though get you to like Scott in the second half of the book and by the time the trial comes round you will be just willing him to get the better of the all powerful but corrupt establishment that is lined up against him.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic book!, 3 Feb 2009
This review is from: The Colour Of Law (Paperback)
Loved this book and was really surprised at how good it was. Great characters and a wonderful plot reminiscent of To Kill A Mockingbird. Loved A Scott and his daughter Boo, thought the relationship between them was briliiantly written, although I felt the author could have portrayed the wife Rebecca, a little less one dimensional, do women like this really exist? Wonderful story though and while of course the outcome is a little bit predictable, the journey is well worth it. Will definitely rush out to buy Mark Giminez other books.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good material, but rather unconvincing, 15 Feb 2010
This review is from: The Colour Of Law (Paperback)
Fenney is a high-flying partner of a leading Dallas law firm. Despite joining the legal profession to become another Atticus Finch (of To Kill the Mockingbird), Fenney quickly abandons principles for money. By overcharging rich clients, he enjoys a lavish lifestyle in the exclusive Highland Park neighbourhood. It seems as though nothing could dampen his success.

But when a senator's son is murdered, allegedly by a prostitute from a poor neighbourhood, a federal judge insists that he represents her pro bono. He fosters the accused's daughter, and becomes so absorbed in defending her as to sacrifice everything (job, wife, home, social status) to keep her from death row.

The scenario presents fertile ground, but is portrayed rather unconvincingly. Would a defence lawyer really foster a prostitute's daughter? Would he sacrifice so much to save just one client? And how did he end up becoming partner of a commercial law firm when what he really wanted was to become another Atticus Finch?

Read it, enjoy it, but don't expect to be convinced by it.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One heck of a book, what a find is all I can say!, 19 July 2007
By 
This review is from: The Colour Of Law (Paperback)
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
What a find!, July 15, 2007

I wasn't sure what to expect from this book when I purchased it but to may amazement it managed to exceed all my expectations.

If I had to describe Mark Gimenez's writing style I'd say is a cross between Grisham and P.D James because it has all the impact of a court room thriller and all the suspense of a "whodunnit."

Scott Fennney is not a likable character when we first meet him, he's a hard headed young lawyer who has managed to pull himself up by his bootstraps from his poor origins to live in a rich area of Dallas, Texas with his lovely but coldly ambitious wife Rebecca and his equally lovely daughter but much nicer daughter Boo, named after a character in the book "To Kill a Mockingbird."

Once upon a time Scott did have scruples and morals but they have long disappeared and he now lives the big expensive life with a multi-million dollar house, drives a Ferrari and represents those who can pay his fat fees.

And then out of the blue he is asked by a judge who still believes the right of a fair trial for every defendant to represent a drug addicted mixed race prostitute called Shawanda who is accused of murdering the white son of a very powerful man, a Senator no less who might one day be the next president of the USA. Shawanda says she didn't kill the Senator's son but it was her gun that ended the life of the violent spoilt 30 year old and she had taken his car which was found not far from where she lived in the projects.

Scott has no choice but to take the case and like everyone else believes Shawanda to be guilty but something happens to Scott during the process of him going through the motions of seeming to represent this unfortunate young woman. Scott suddenly finds out he has a conscience and that even though he still believes that Shawanda is guilty he has every intention of fighting for her God given right to a fair trial, and from then on he finds out that he is not only fighting for Shawanda's life, he is also fighting for his own, and that of his daughter Boo and Shawanda's daughter Pajame who he rescued from the Projects and bought home to stay with him and Boo.

A riveting read from the first page to the last, I read it in one sitting and then read it again, a great story with a twist and sting in the tale that leads up to a climatic and suspenseful court scene in which Scott suddenly realizes the shocking truth, Shawanda is actually not guilty of the murder of the Senator's son and that another is guilty of the crime she is standing trial for...
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One for the Holidays, 6 May 2007
By 
Lynn Davies (North Yorkshire) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Colour Of Law (Paperback)
My husband read this book and told me - yes told me to read it - we are both Grisham fans and love a good courtroom drama. This book ticks all the boxes and truth be know I couldn't put it down. A very good début book and I can also recommend his second book 'Abduction'

Take them both on holiday with you - you wont be disappointed.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Worth 3.5 stars rather than 4, 11 April 2011
By 
Michael Watson "skirrow22" (Halifax, England) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Colour Of Law (Paperback)
This debut novel is sufficiently interesting for me to have just picked up a copy of 'Accused', the follow-on to 'The Colour of Law'. I hope it is somewhat better than this first novel in the way it deals with the character-building lifestyle of the main protagonust, Dallas commercial lawyer A.Scott Fenney. It's not that there's anything wrong with the way the story pans out, it's just that everything falls into place for the main people involved far too easily, notwithstanding the enormous pressures plied on to Fenny.

He becomes a criminal lawyer in order to defend a black hooker on a charge of murdering the son of a would-be US President, resulting, therefore, in all manner of social depravations for Fenney and his family. If you overlook this smoothing out of what for anyone else would be life shattering and concentrate on the underbelly of corporate Texas, the story is good. Mark Gimenez knows his onions and as he peels back the layers, it's enough to make anyone weep.

Even so, it's a bit twee but I'm looking forward to 'Accused' in the hope Fenney's charcater improves as, I believe, he now has to defend his divorced wife. Oh happy days.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Move over Mr Grisham, there's a new kid in town!!!, 28 May 2007
By 
Jules "policechick" (Hertforshire, England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Colour Of Law (Paperback)
I read this purely having seen somebody on the train miss their station - he was so totally engrossed in the story!

So here's an outline of the plot. A.Scott Fenney has made it. He has the partnership, the family, the boys toys, the great house and all the other trappings of wealth. But he has lost his sense of self. When he is tricked by a wily old judge into defending a prostitute accused of killing a senators son he tries hard to wriggle out of his responsibility.

But unable to do this he takes on the case. As the story progresses you start to like A.Scott Fenney. He begins to rediscover just what it was that made him want to practice law and his childhood fighting spirit resurfaces. He is up against the establishment and a corrupt senator in his fight to clear his clients name and soon realises that if he wants to do good it will come at great cost.

I won't spoilt the outcome of the book but it's well written, pacy and the ensemble of characters works well. I read it over an extremely wet bank holiday weekend and it kept me gripped. If you like John Grisham, Richard North Patterson or Steve Martini then you'll like this book too.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing book!, 24 Jan 2011
By 
This review is from: The Colour Of Law (Paperback)
The first book i read from Gimenez and what a nice surprise. You don't want to stop reading the book until the end. Highly recommend.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Compelling legal thriller, 16 Mar 2010
By 
Phil Robertshaw (North Somerset) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Colour Of Law (Paperback)
There have been a lot of comparisons with John Grisham in other reviews of this book. Let's ignore those, though, and concentrate on The Colour of Law in its own right.

A. Scott Fenney doesn't start out as a likeable character. He's rich, he only cares about using the law to make money for himself and for his clients and he'll win in whatever way he can. All that changes when he's forced to defend a prostitute accused of murdering the son of a senator - a man who is destined, according to all opinion polls, to be the next president.

Scott first tries to foist the case on his former friend, street lawyer Bobby, but has no choice but to become involved. As he comes under pressure to drop a key line of defence, Scott realises that he does care about justice and a fair trial, in no small way influenced by taking care of the defendant's daughter and seeing her relationship with his own daughter flourish. As the rich trappings of his life fall away, he fights ever harder for his client.

It could be said that there is a fair amount of padding in the novel, which at times slows down the pace, but the background detail is really a pleasure to read because Gimenez is a good descriptive writer, expert at creating rounded characters with detailed backgrounds and settings. This is perhaps why we are able to grow to care for them. Aside from this, he knows how to crank up the pace when needed. The second half of the book accelerates as the tension increases and the trial approaches.

There's enough excitement here to keep most legal or crime fans very satisfied. Overall this is a very good thriller which comes highly recommended.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Good, Enjoyable, Although Predictable, Read!, 5 Jun 2008
By 
Bobbewig (New Jersey, USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Color of Law (Hardcover)
Mark Gimenez's first legal thriller is very fast-paced and highly entertaining. With the exception of the two nine-year old girls (who are too "cutesy" and knowledgeable to be very credible), most of the characters are pretty well-developed and believable. The plot is interesting and exciting, and Giminez's cynical description of what being a top corporate lawyer is like seems very accurate. The Color Of Law, although ultimately mostly predictable, will keep the pages flying through your fingers. If you are into legal thrillers, I think The Color Of Law is a book you will enjoy.
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The Colour Of Law
The Colour Of Law by Mark Gimenez (Paperback - 28 Feb 2013)
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