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20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars ***A Crime Committed...In More Ways Than One***
Caleb Carr's sequel to the fantastic 'Alienist' is cut from the same cloth as, say...The Godfather part-2...in that it's in many ways superior to it's predecessor. Angel of Darkness stands alone in terms of story, it's not a continuation, but the characters created so richly in the first book are written with much more evolution here.
Forensic science may not appeal...
Published on 18 July 2003 by S. J. Smith

versus
2.0 out of 5 stars All too boring
I bought this book on a recommend and it sounded like a rollocking good read but oh no it wasn't. The idea and outline of the story was good but the prose was awful. The dialogue was too long. Descriptions were overly drawn out, along with side characters and how they were relative to the story (but eventually turning out to have no real relevance to the story). I...
Published on 9 Nov 2010 by catmad


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20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars ***A Crime Committed...In More Ways Than One***, 18 July 2003
By 
S. J. Smith - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
Caleb Carr's sequel to the fantastic 'Alienist' is cut from the same cloth as, say...The Godfather part-2...in that it's in many ways superior to it's predecessor. Angel of Darkness stands alone in terms of story, it's not a continuation, but the characters created so richly in the first book are written with much more evolution here.
Forensic science may not appeal to a great demographic, it's not a big turn on for me generally, but when it's set in a time and environment that looked upon on it as almost devilish...it tends to become a whole lot more compelling.
So, the good Dr. Kreizler returns when his considerable pyschological skills are once more required to hunt down a serial killer who seems to have a destructive notion of motherhood. Kreizler's team is re-assembled, sporting fabulous characters that pull you effortlessly into late 19th century New York. The hunt is on. The team works incognito from their usual crime related professions and has to avoid detection by the local police force who are already involved in the case, this only makes their task harder.
Moore...the cynical edged journalist and Kreizler's oldest friend. The Isaac brothers...almost comic relief if not for their amazing knowledge of forensic science and revolutionary approach to crime fighting. And, Teddy Roosevelt, who constantly acts as a public shield for Kreizler's oft critisised methods. Roosevelts inclusion initially feels awkward to the reader but quickly lends the writing an amazing level of believability.
And how to prosecute a killer discovered, caught and brought to justice utilising experimental science widely seen as inadmissable to a court of law? How the world has changed. Now you can't prosecute a criminal without it.
Carr's depth of writing, both location and character, is woven so beautifully it's almost a despair to close the book as your eyelids cry out for sleep. A true Dickens of the modern age with a natural flair for crafting a time we'll never revisit. Rich beyond compare.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Book You Don't Want to End, 13 Jan 2003
By A Customer
This is terrific read. A novel of old New York peopled with characters we come to love during the course of their investigation into the kidnapping of a womans child. I actually read this before I read "The Alienist", which is equally as good and introduces all these wonderful characters to the reader.
Stevie tells the story this time (Moore narrated "The Alienist") as our group of friends use Dr. Kreizler's revolutionary methods to solve this mystery. He is an Alienist (early psychiatrist) and together with Moore, Sara, the Isaacsons, and Cyrus a riveting and at times edge of your seat adventure springs forth.
Carr is so good that before you realize it you are in Old New York at the turn of the century and so in love with these people that you hate to leave them for sleep or work. The author does for Old New York and Psychiatry what John Dunning did for books in his Cliff Janeway series. At over 600 pages your interest never lags and is the case with all great books when that last page is turned it will be reluctantly. The characters are all to human and real, as is the time period. The solving of the Beechum case of "The Alienist" (which I also recommend) came at a great personal price to Dr. Kreizler, and in The Angel of Darkness Stevie will grow up and face tragedy of his own.
Other writers who attempt to evoke a period mystery like this pale in comparison to Carr. You really are THERE in Old New York and Carr fleshes the characters out so that you actually care about each and every one of them. There are moments of action and suspense that keep you turning pages as quickly as you can read. The historical figures are not just "thrown in" to evoke the time period. Carr makes them come alive as well, just as he did with Dr. Kreizler's friend Theodore Roosevelt in "The Alienist".
This will be one of the most entertaining books you will ever read but it is not without substance as well. If you want a great period mystery filled with danger and suspense, and even tragic romance (I won't spoil it for you), then this is the book to get.
Return to Delmonico's where great food is still served and your old friends (and they will be when you finish this book) are planning their next move against a kidnapper and a murderer of children in Old New York!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Powerfully descriptive, with beautifully drawn characters., 12 Sep 1999
By A Customer
A follow up to "The Alienist" which proved just as compelling reading - it is unputdownable. Events and surroundings are now seen through the eyes of young Stevie Taggert (The Stevepipe), a character whose life and experiences aroused interest in the previous book, allowing us to see more of his personal story that was only hinted at before. An orphan with a knowledge of criminal activity that far exceeds that of his elders, and the constant supply of cigarettes he supplys make him a central part of the team on this complex and intriguing case. One of the best characterisations for readers of "The Alienist" is that of journalist John Moore - seen through eyes other than his own a far more interesting, if more irritating character developes, although his intelligence seems to be compromised in the process. The case of serial killer Libby Hatch brings together a wonderful set of well-drawn characters to once again push forward the boundaries of criminal science. Set in 1890's New York the vivid descriptions of the less savoury aspects of that great city bring the book to life.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Utterly engaging., 27 April 2004
By A Customer
Picked this up from a charity store, quite by chance, and found the storythoroughly entertaining. A carefully crafted plot and fantastic attentionto period detail, left me only wanting to find out more about Caleb Carr,and read the other books he's written. Certainly an author I'll be lookingout for in the future.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A truely troubling thriller!, 19 Feb 2001
After the Alienist it would be hard for any author to produce a work of equal magnificence, and yet Carr succeeds. A troubling thriller that questions perceived attitudes and prejudices that persist even to the modern day. Though slightly less believable than the Alienist, this tale holds the reader so ferociously that you won't notice until the end.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Second Time Reading This Book., 9 Jun 2014
By 
Linda L. Kassarjian "book lover" (Watertown, MA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
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This review is from: The Angel Of Darkness: Number 2 in series (Laszlo Kreizler & John Schuyler Moore) (Paperback)
I loved this story and all the main characters. I read both books years ago. They were better the second time around.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Angel of darkness, 23 Jun 2013
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Got this for my husband and he is very pleased with it and we will be getting more books for him.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Part of the family again, 23 April 2013
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This review is from: The Angel Of Darkness: Number 2 in series (Laszlo Kreizler & John Schuyler Moore) (Paperback)
The sequel to Caleb Carr's 'The Alienist'. Well if you've read the first book and loved it then you'll love this one too. Told from a different viewpoint but that same feeling of being part of the team again, also the same feeling of leaving friends when you finish it... If you haven't read 'The Alienist', then go and read that first!
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4.0 out of 5 stars Angel of Darkness, 21 Mar 2013
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This review is from: The Angel Of Darkness: Number 2 in series (Laszlo Kreizler & John Schuyler Moore) (Paperback)
A very good story. Well written. Have recommended it to family and friends. Still reading it. Looking forward to reading the Alienist next.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A touchstone for storytelling and view into the human abyss, 4 Jun 2011
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The Angel of Darkness succeeds in being its own story, standing apart from it's spiritual prequel, The Alienist, with a good sense of flow and an intriguing plot. Viewing the story from the perspective of a character not blemished by pessimism or 'grown up' societal stuffiness is a refreshing read. Dwelling into society's reluctance to accept that a woman can be capable of such evil even against her own flesh and blood is as contemporary in the present day as it was now, offering a poignant contemplation on just how much society has really progressed since the mid-1800s.

Carr writes with the eye of a historian and the mind of a true character studier, bringing together suspense and all too realistic heart-crushing anticipation.
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