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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reasons why this is this is the Da Vinci Code it's okay to love:
1. Whether you love or despise The Da Vinci Code, it had a pretty intriguing mystery (about Jesus' life and death) at its centre. The mystery in The Dead Sea Deception (also about Jesus' life and death) is miles better.

2. It's crazy in all the right ways -- it knocks around the globe at a breakneck pace -- but seems completely plausible. Not sure how the...
Published on 25 Aug 2011 by Val Coverly

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3.0 out of 5 stars Don't judge a book by its cover...
...is how the saying goes. Another, always take people's reviews (including this one) with a healthy pinch of salt. I say this because these two factors influenced my decision to purchase the book - two reasons that, in this case, proved a little deceptive.

My main complaint about the book is the prominence on the front cover of the words:...
Published on 22 May 2012 by Snow


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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reasons why this is this is the Da Vinci Code it's okay to love:, 25 Aug 2011
This review is from: The Dead Sea Deception (Paperback)
1. Whether you love or despise The Da Vinci Code, it had a pretty intriguing mystery (about Jesus' life and death) at its centre. The mystery in The Dead Sea Deception (also about Jesus' life and death) is miles better.

2. It's crazy in all the right ways -- it knocks around the globe at a breakneck pace -- but seems completely plausible. Not sure how the author does this. Also, I truly, truly had no idea what was going to happen next -- unlike The Da Vinci Code, where you could sort of see where things were going about halfway through.

3. The writing is downright GOOD -- like, REALLY good. My copy says that the author writes other books in a different genre under another name, so he clearly knows what he's doing.

4. The Sicarii (the villains). They. Are. Brilliant.

5. Unlike Dan Brown, Adam Blake is excellent at feeding you information and historical data without ramming it down your throat. I learned a lot from this book, but it didn't feel like a lecture.

Dazzling...
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35 of 37 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Deceptively good, 17 Aug 2011
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This review is from: The Dead Sea Deception (Paperback)
I'd stuck this book so far down the pile of "to reads" it might have been passed off as one of the sacred scrolls itself. I count among the ranks of Holy Blood and Holy Grail nerds, and I was miffed at Dan Brown's Da Vinci Code, even though I enjoyed the film (Tom Hanks's hair: what a scream!). I just assumed The Dead Sea Deception was just another wannabe.

I was wrong. It's a clever romp and very tidily put together too, for the most part. It has an intriguing build-up, characters you can care about and a plot which draws you along until suddenly you're thoroughly enjoying yourself in totally implausible country.

You have a mercenary with a mountain of baggage, a lesbian cop with plenty of hassles to deal with, a Yank cop of the Tommy Lee Jones No Country For Old Men variety, and a religious psycho leading a small army in his image. After an explosive start the book gets down to business. A nutty and soon-to-be-dead professor has sussed out a secret in one of the Dead Sea Scrolls, a secret a fanatical sect want kept under wraps. Adam Blake takes this straightforward idea and runs with it. Runs with it so far, your mental jaw will drop. But he had me convinced and I was looking up details on the Internet just to check out the possibilities, and I've since learnt a stack more than the fact that Blake is a fine storyteller.

Now I've realised, late in the day, that I rather enjoy this genre and I'm going to have to move them further up the tottering pile. If they're all as good as this it could be a life-changing move.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Starts well, doesn't follow through, 15 Aug 2011
By 
Keris Nine - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Dead Sea Deception (Paperback)
A thriller based around the discovery of a secret message hidden within an obscure Dead Sea Scrolls codex sounds like another book on the Da Vinci Code bandwagon, but Adam Blake's The Dead Sea Deception is an intriguing conspiracy thriller that manages for the most part to avoid all the usual hokum. I'm not sure everyone will agree that it sustains that intrigue right through to the final revelations, but there's enough here to keep you there to see where it takes you - and where it ends up is a surprise in itself. The pacing is initially slow - or not so much slow or even leisurely, as considered, taking its time to establish the situation and the motivation of the book's main characters who find themselves involved, through different entry points, in the mystery of the Rotgut Codex.

Heather Kennedy, a London police-officer out of favour with her colleagues over an earlier incident, initially finds something unusual about the routine investigation of the accidental death of a university lecturer. Her investigations link his death with that of other historians who were all working together on a project relating to a seemingly obscure and minor Dead Sea Scrolls codex. One name comes up in connection with her enquiry - Michael Brand. The search for this elusive character, and internal resistance to her methods and the direction her investigation is taking, brings Kennedy into contact with a mercenary ex-soldier, Leo Tillman. Tillman is also on the trail of Brand and the mysterious worldwide organisation that he seems to be a part of - an organisation Tillman believes is responsible for the disappearance of his wife and three children thirteen years ago.

There's nothing particularly original about these two different characters but, each with very different motivations, they do give the novel a good balance between proper investigation and all-out action adventure. On the character development front then, the Dead Sea Deception works really well, but it is also excellent in the way that it slowly builds up a credible and exciting global conspiracy based around the content of the Dead Sea Scrolls. As long as that mystery remains unexplained, the novel retains its intrigue, but the moment that the connection is made to the flight disaster in the United States that opens the book, credibility starts to become somewhat strained and plot holes appear. Although the author resolves everything in a relatively satisfactory manner, the actual revelations of the codex prove to be disappointing - for me at least - as does the rather conventional dramatic final confrontation between the opposing rivals that wraps up the story.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not as described, but still very good., 19 Oct 2012
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This review is from: The Dead Sea Deception (Paperback)
'Everything we know about the death of Christ is a lie.'
'The Dead Sea Deception'. The reader should be forgiven on reading these words for assuming this is a novel about Christ and the Dead Sea Scrolls. Well, it sort of is, and it sort of isn't. There is nothing here about Christ except a reworking of the Judas Gospel discovered fairly recently, and nothing about the Dead Sea Scrolls at all. Nevertheless, this is a good read, a detective story and action thriller which is easy to read, fast-paced, and very enjoyable. Highly recommended, but the blurb about Christ is in my view deliberately misleading.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Well worth a read..., 8 April 2012
This review is from: The Dead Sea Deception (Paperback)
A good yarn, with numerous page turning moments.
The book starts with a major air crash in the US and then moves on to a series of murders in the UK. Over the course of the next chapters, the seemingly unrelated events are linked together by the central characters.
The book builds at a good pace, is full of action and great characters. Plenty of action and adventure plus some honour and touching character moments.
Well worth a read.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Its a good read!, 25 Aug 2011
By 
L. A. Carr "Northstar" (Derbyshire Peak District, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
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My main problem with this book is its re-working of the now almost standard formula, ie " Mysterious cult/religion/secret society formed 2000+ years ago, links to Jesus and early Christians, today the cult is powerful, hidden and very dangerous, dreadful secret hidden in old documents/books/artifact that has huge impact on our lives today etc etc etc" So many books seem to follow this formula these days eg The Da Vinci Code as others have mentioned.

Having made the above comments this books is very well written and very readable, I really enjoyed it. Its a good read and it takes the standard plot and somehow adds enough twists and turns to make it worth buying.

One final comment, how about an author coming up with an original plot line that links ancient writings/artifacts to our lives today without using magic, religion or secret societies? Now that would be worth reading!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Clever, 17 May 2014
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This review is from: The Dead Sea Deception (Paperback)
Clever plot and clever story telling. Don't let the apparent similarities to Dan Brown's work influence your purchase decision (whether or not you like his stuff). I used to be a big fan of espionage fiction and there are dozens of authors and probably hundreds of Cold War espionage thrillers - They're all different in their own way. Similarly, The Dead Sea Deception is different to DB's books (both in content and style). I've purchased the sequel (The Demon Code) and can't wait to read it.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Good Book, 4 Oct 2013
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This review is from: The Dead Sea Deception (Paperback)
Good book, interesting read. Nice historical basis. It will keep you turning pages. Books condition as advertised and arrived quickly and well packaged.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Mike review., 20 July 2013
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Any who likes Dan Brown,s stories would like this,keeps you intrigued from beginning to end .thoroughly enjoyable.enjoyed it all the way through.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Dead Sea Deception, 29 May 2013
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This review is from: The Dead Sea Deception (Paperback)
I enjoy this genre, and this was a reasonable yarn of its kind. I would probably read other books by this author.
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The Dead Sea Deception
The Dead Sea Deception by Adam Blake (Paperback - 18 Aug 2011)
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