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4.6 out of 5 stars
I Am Ozzy
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 23 August 2010
Having read the Brian Johnson bio just before starting this one, i was already in the right mood, those two guys comes from the same kind of backgrounds, working class that is, same kind of humor, and are two funny guys too.

Of course, there was many things i knew about the Ozz',and i was afraid of not knowing more than i already do about him, but,i've learned new things along the ride, it's well written, and makes you want to turn the page to see what is next catastrophy happening to him, beside that, Ozzy is a simple guy who just wanted to sing in a rock'n'roll band, and you feel yourself sorry for him sometimes, feeling that all this fame is too much for him. Fan or not, interesting book from a guy who started from scratch in the suburbs of Birmingham,UK, to the rockstar we all know.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 2 May 2011
What a fantastic book.

So good it makes you feel like you were there all along with Ozzy - but without all the health risks! As a follower of Mr. Osbourne's career I can report the book was virtually as I'd imagined his life had been upto now (or as Ozzy states as close as he can remember). It is just like the life we all experience:- funny, sad, insane, but expanded and distorted in all directions. If you want a book that makes you laugh more than anything with some touching moments thrown in, this is the book. Moving to see Mr. Randy Rhoads (R.I.P.) still gets mentioned with admiration at every opportunity (god bless you fella).

The only way it could be better is if Ozzy spent a day chatting to you over a few pints, but then he'd only end up doing something daft again...
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Not a massive Black Sabbath fan, I now am, this is a great insight into this complex maniac genius.Sharon emerges as a clever and vulnerable person who stuck by Ozzy through dark and disasterous times.From his childhood in aston through the crazy train of decades this book made me laugh , learn and understand a little more about addictive personality, dyslexia and attention disorders.
There is no malice toward anyone really , except a couple of references to celebs that take themself too seriously er Ozzy never.I dont want to get too philosophical however reading about legends and their inner troubles makes me feel better for doing so.Its an easy read and I believe theres a follow up book due out.The house hunting story has made a lot of people laugh believe me man.....
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 22 January 2014
There's actually very little about Sabbaths music in this book, but if you enjoy drinking stories and animal cruelty (and I'm not refering specifically to the Dove/Bat incidents) then this book is for you. Ozzy is just way too shallow for my taste. I should have bought Iommi's book.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 7 January 2010
Bit dissappointed this wasnt the man himself talking, if i`d realised i would have bought the book instead. Good life story though and still recommended for anyone who has even a passing interest in Black Sabbath, The Osbournes or Ozzy himself.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
Everybody knows Ozzy Osbourne in one way or another -- classic satanic rocker, burned-out family man, or whatever.

So he tries to incorporate a little of everything in "I Am Ozzy," a rough'n'tumble autobiography full of all the embarrassing, unflattering, sometimes bizarre details of his life. It takes awhile to get used to his rambling style, but these stories have an unpolished brand of charm... and he's undoubtedly had an interesting life.

John "Ozzy" Osbourne was born into a working-class, impoverished British family, had a miserable stint at school, and seemed destined for "manual labor or manual labor." Instead, he went to prison.

Fortunately for Black Sabbath fans, that isn't where the story ends. After hearing the Beatles and Fleetwood Mac, he became enamored of the rock'n'roll life... albeit a darker, weirder side than the hippie-dippie stuff that was popular at the time. And after a few failed bands, he got into a true, brilliant band that was later named Black Sabbath, hated by critics and much beloved by music fans.

He got married, had sex with groupies (in that order), went on Top of the Pops, encountered satanic freakfans, and produced a slew of albums with Black Sabbath. Lots of booze and drugs. As you'd expect, both he and the band started spiralling out of control. But after quitting it, he got involved with his future second wife Sharon, and launched out on a new life of music, madness, sex, dove-biting, bat-biting and -- most horribly -- reality TV.

Honestly, I didn't much care for "I Am Ozzy" during the first few chapters. The combination of a misspent youth and Osbourne's rambling style gave me a bit of a headache. But after awhile, his life story starts to grow on you -- his stories became funnier and more bizarre (how he almost killed a vicar with a hash cake) and his meandering way of recounting the past begins to flow more easily.

And since this is Ozzy Osbourne, he's got a LOT of freaky stories, so the book feels like sitting down and listening to the old guy natter about the Bad Ol' Days. Some are filthy, some are crazy, and some are just plain hilarious (`There's this incredible new thing. It's American and it's called pizza!"). And he writes in a rough-hewn, unpretentious style that meanders all over the place, but has charm.

Of course, it's got the F-word sprinkled through it hundreds and hundreds of times. What else would you expect?

And to his credit, Osbourne is unafraid to admit to the uglier parts of his life -- he was a burglar, he fired shotguns at small animals, and he cheated on Wife #1, as well as other sundry regrets. He's also pleasantly down-to-earth about his music, even when people didn't like it or didn't get it ("Are you sure they didn't make a mistake, son?" "What d'you mean?" "This cross is upside down").

It took a little while to grow on me, but "I Am Ozzy" ends up being an R-rated funride through the nasty world of rock and drugs -- the good, the bad, and the really gross.
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on 9 June 2015
(sorry about the inevitable mistakes, I'm from a non-english speaking country)
Like many other people reviewing this book, I'm fanatical of both Black Sabbath and Ozzy, and I believe they created some of the most wonderful and powerful music in Rock, the first six Black Sabbath albums being quite simply the Old Testament of Heavy Metal. Obviously, I read this book with great antecipation, but I have to say that all in all I was disapointed. 'I Am Ozzy' is genuinly funny, mostly opened and frank, and I had a lot of loud laughs, as Ozzy is the personification of crazyness and r'n'r excess, and his life story is trully unbelievable. However, after a while, the constant drug and alcohol excesses become tiresome, revealing a too egotistical and shallow human being, capable of atrocities against animals, and a brainless and reckless behaviour that shows little concern towards the people he is supposed to love the most. A few times he is called by people he enraged 'an animal', and saddly the reader has the discomfortable feeling that the thing isn't funny anymore and this accusation somehow rings true. I incondionally love his solo albums, some of them trully Metal masterpieces, so I find it awkward and difficult to connect the fabulous interpreter (and partially creator) of this music with the man portraited in the book.
Other problem that I have with 'I Am Ozzy' is that it barely speaks of the music, opting again and again for the endless descriptions of alcohol and drug stupors, wich actually make it very dificult to believe that the man is still alive and kicking. There are also other chapters in his story that are completely missing, like his former drummer Randy Castillo, others are too biased, like the reference to Ronnie James Dio, and a fantastic album like 'No Rest For the Wicked' isn't even mentioned...

All in all, a light and fun reading, but there are too many things lacking, and I'm sorry to say that, although I'll forever be a fan of the music in wich he was envolved, my admiration for him as a man has diminished a lot, because the reader is left with the feeling that Ozzy comes across this book as a fool jester with un unbelievable luck. Wich I have to say I don't believe, because he is a terrific singer and a wonderful musician, so it's a shame that Ozzy choosed to write only about his wild side, instead of enlightning the positive sides of his life and career.
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on 8 April 2015
I suggest reading my review of Iron Man: My Journey Through Heaven and Hell with Black Sabbath before reading this one (here: http://goo.gl/NEn5Zv). The same thoughts and comments apply with I Am Ozzy and I’m not going to reproduce them in this review ….

When I was a teenager in the 1980’s I was always aware that Ozzy was a bad, scary man. He definitely wasn’t the shambling person you see on his reality TV program. He was, without a doubt, the Prince of Darkness. But being more into thrash metal at the time, his music always seemed too melodic for me. In fact I recall saying at the time after listening to some of his albums, “they’re okay but they’re not Black Sabbath”. So, its only in recent years when my tastes have mellowed that I’ve caught up on his back catalogue. Apart from the same stories being regurgitated when he appears on chat shows, the rest of what Ozzy had to say about his career was somewhat of a mystery to me. So, it was with great anticipation that I picked-up I Am Ozzy and started to read.

Hats off to Chris Ayers who has taken Ozzy’s recollections and turned them into a coherent narrative. The text is less detailed than in Tony Iommi‘s book, but perhaps that’s because Tony didn’t go quite as mad as Ozzy and can recall more? But saying this Ozzy has been on an amazing journey and there are laughs and moments of real sadness too. In a similar way to Tony Iommi, you get the impression that he does not posses isn’t much of an ego. It seems like Ozzy has never forgotten his roots. He is also honest too. He feels remorse at the domestic violence and missing so much of his children’s lives being high or drunk. There are moments of animal cruelty. He loves guns and he discusses the madness of the TV show. He gives us his thoughts on meeting the Queen and the President, being in jail, his love for Sharon, the list goes on and on. It’s amazing how Ozzy is actually still alive, but he’s live to tell the tale … and what a tale it is.

If you’re a fan of Ozzy Osbourne or Black Sabbath then this book is a must buy. Why not read it in conjunction with Black Sabbath: Symptom of the Universe by Mick Wall and Iron Man too, like I did? By reading supplemental texts I found that it helped to flesh out some of the missing details as I Am Ozzy is more of a series of personal memoirs as opposed to a detailed autobiography.

Recommended, although I liked Tony’s book more!

Quotes:

I also highlighted several quotes from the book too. These resonated with me in one way or another and I thought they were worth repeating here:

“Hating people isn’t a productive way of living. So what’s the point in hating anyone? There’s enough hate in the world as it is, without me adding to it.”

“What can go wrong will go wrong.”

“When you’re in love, it’s not just about the messing around in the sack, it’s about how empty you feel when they’re gone.”

“The power of people, when they focus on something positive, never fails to amaze me.”

“I grew up having to piss in a bucket ’cos there was no indoor s***ter, and now I have these computerised Japanese super-loo things that have heated seats and wash and blow-dry your arse at the touch of a button. Give it a couple of years and I’ll have a bog with a robot arm that pulls out my turds, so I don’t have to strain.”

“You’ve got to try and take things to the next level, or you’ll just get stuck in a rut.”

“‘All I can say is that I lost two of the greatest people in my life,’ I said, trying not to choke up. ‘But it ain’t gonna stop me because I’m about rock’n’roll, and rock’n’roll is for the people, and I love people, and that’s what I’m about. I’m going to continue because Randy [Rhoads] would have liked me to, and so would Rachel [Youngblood], and I’m not going to stop, ’cos you can’t kill rock’n’roll.’”

“Even now, I have a lot of trouble understanding why Sharon stayed – or why she married me in the first place, come to think of it. I mean, she was actually afraid of me half the time. And the truth was I was afraid of me, too. Afraid of what I’d do to myself or, even worse, to someone else.”

“I wasn’t exactly much fun to be around. Being with me was like falling into an abyss.”

“I even tried to join the army, but they wouldn’t have me. The bloke in the uniform took one look at my ugly mug and said, ‘Sorry, we want subjects, not objects’.”
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VINE VOICEon 24 December 2010
I'm a huge fan of Ozzy's, have been for many years. By no means am I as dedicated or as long lasting a fan as others who will have read this book, and if I'm honest, I'm not that much into rock music at all. Ozzy has always seemed like a man that, despite his success, has managed to keep his feet firmly on the ground. Being fascinated by the character of Ozzy for quite a number of years, I was excited to hear that he'd brought a book out and looked forward to learning about a man I'd admired for a long time. No doubt this book is informative, and at times, very funny, but it wasn't quite what I had expected.

I am not one to read these celebrity type books, and let's face it, this is yet another one that is just a cheap cash-in on a famous name. It's clear from the get-go that the actual writer (co-written by Chris Ayres because of Ozzy's dyslexia) wanted to give a "conversations with Ozzy" feel. He clearly wanted to give the feeling that you were sitting in the same room with the man and he was telling you the story of his life as if Ozzy and the reader were sat in the pub together. The attempt of it failed miserably, which I found immensely disappointing. It didn't quite flow as you would expect and I constantly felt like I was reading a book, and not discovering the life of Ozzy.

To not sound completely nuts I'll try and explain. When reading a good book, you lose yourself in the pages. This isn't exclusive to fantasy novels where you envisage yourself taking part in the intimacies of the story, or can simply picture the events as if watching a superb movie. A good writer can achieve the same effect from an autobiography to the point where you forget you're reading a book and actually feel like you're having the conversation with the person you're reading about. That was never achieved with this book, which is wholly disappointing. All the hardcore Ozzy fans should definitely give this a read, but I'm not promising you will be able to lose yourself in the pages.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 11 October 2010
I really enjoyed this a lot more than I thought I would! Its basically Ozzy's autobiography, written in the way he would say it - so lots of swearing - but it was really entertaining and interesting. I also liked how he didn't really shy away from things like his split with Black Sabbath and when he nearly strangled Sharon, he seemed quite honest about it all. Although I know there was probably loads of half truths and bits missed out, but it was a good, fun read. Recommended if you're into metal, or Ozzy, or music biographies :)
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