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130
4.8 out of 5 stars
For One More Day
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74 of 75 people found the following review helpful
on 31 July 2007
'For One More Day' is a sentimental book, and it is similar in its reverie for the after-life to his other book 'The Five People You Meet in Heaven'; however, this is the better of the two. For One More Day encourages introspection about situations and people in your own life, and there is an underlying spiritual/real world crossover, which is intriguing (and a little creepy), if not only for a moment. The story is of a man facing a crisis and coming to terms with some of his "demons", which help to repair his life, if only in his own mind. He gets to revisit things that have troubled him in his life while facing his mortality, and he rectifies things with his mother he didn't even know needed rectifying. In 'For One More Day' you realize that Mitch Albom just seems to "get" people. He imbues his books with softness and light, and he seems to cherish even the smallest of human interactions. In the final chapter of 'For One More Day', there is enough cleverness to give you food for thought and appreciate a sweet book by a good author and some time well spent.
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29 of 30 people found the following review helpful
This kind and generous book is a mini version of The Five People You Meet in Heaven for revisiting your life to develop another perspective on it. In this case, Charley Benetto comes to see his mother through different eyes. A self-sacrificing woman, Pauline (Posey), had shielded Charley from all of the challenges their little family had faced. All that Charley knew was that his beloved Dad had moved out when Charley was young and didn't reappear in his life until his college years.

The set-up is pretty extreme. Charley goes to pieces after his mother dies. He drinks too much. He loses his money. He drives away his wife and daughter. He loses all his desire to live. Hitting bottom, Charley decides to kill himself. He heads back towards his old home town . . . and finds many surprises . . . including another day with his deceased mother.

The core of the book's appeal is the deft way that Mr. Albom captures the ambiguity many sons have towards the support they receive from their Mothers, while the Mothers are acting like the saints they often are. A good secondary appeal is the gradual exposure of deeply buried family secrets.

It's that latter point that I would like to address a little more. Families keep secrets from children for all kinds of good reasons. But children do become adults, and somewhere along the way the relationships will be improved if the secrets are revealed. You cannot hope to believe in Santa Claus all of your life in the same way you did as a five-year-old. If your parents are still alive (and I hope they will be for many years to come), think about what you don't understand about what they did when you were young. Ask them to tell you the answers. You'll all grow closer in the process.

Having found myself saying the eulogy over my father's coffin after an unexpected death, I also encourage you to be sure that you would feel at peace with yourself if your parents died today. If you wouldn't feel that way, take steps to improve that situation now. You can't be sure you'll be given a second chance like Charlie was.

Mr. Albom's book is a quick and pleasant read. He's a good story teller. But don't expect a book that's nearly as good as The Five People You Meet in Heaven. For One More Day is well below that standard in concept and execution. But it's a book that's well worth reading . . . even if it only makes you more sensitive to your Mother's needs.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
TOP 1000 REVIEWERon 13 January 2007
you had the chance to go back in time and spend a day with a loved one that passed on, and be able to say all the things you wanted to tell them but never did, would you have the emotional strength to do it? That is the basic premise of Mitch Albom's very poignant new book, For One More Day. While some reviewers criticize this book for being sappy and intentionally trying to "pull on your heartstrings," I found it to be a well-written, sentimental fable that made me self-reflect on my own relationship with my parents. In the course of my hectic life, I have, at times, made excuses to myself for not giving them the attention they deserved. While I cannot go back and tell my father how much I appreciated all that he did for me when he was alive, For One More Day made me realize that it is not too late to do so with my 89 year-old mother. For One More Day is a book I'd highly recommend to you, and especially so if you've lost a parent.
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24 of 25 people found the following review helpful
on 4 May 2007
Mitch Albom once again exceeds himself with this latest novel. The basis of the story centres around how you would spend one last day with someone that you had lost. We all have stuff that is left unfinished with lost loved ones; Mitch hits at the heart strings by making us question how we would spend one last day.

Having lost a loved one, I would give my eye teeth to have one last day or a last hour. This book made me consider the lessons that I had learnt while my Grandmother was alive, rather than mourning what I did not have. It made me feel grateful for her continued prescence in my life and the life long lessons that I carry through with me.

Albom writes beautifully, carrying the reader with his every word. Ensuring that we are hanging on the story as it unfolds, wishing that we were the main character. The moral surrounding the family and renewed and rejoiced connections, is cleverly entwined with beautiful descriptions and annotations. There have been few books that have touched my heart, like this one. A must read for everyone :-)
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33 of 35 people found the following review helpful
When I read 'Five People you meet in Heaven' I was moved, almost to the point of tears. I can remember thinking that, if I saw another book by this author, I would buy it; and so, as soon as I saw 'For One More Day', I knew I had to get it. For some reason, it sat on the pile for a couple of weeks - what a mistake! On opening it, I was totally engrossed - in fact, I literally could not put it down! Since then, I have already re-read it once, and it is one book that will NOT be going to the next book sale!

To begin with, the concept is one which will appeal to all those of us who have lost a loved one - particularly to those of us who have lost a parent. how many of us would refuse the offer to spend one more day with them? How much would we learn from such an experience, particularly with the knowledge that it really is 'Just one more day' - a never to be repeated experience.

This book focuses on the life of a man who is so 'down'that he tries to commit suicide - only to find himself 'travelling back' and spending one more day getting to know his mother - on a totally different level; and through this is able to come to terms with his own life, becoming more able to cope.

It is very cleverly written, with intriguing twists and turns in the plot which keep you guessing right to the end. It is also extremely thought provoking, causing you to reflect on your own relationships and regrets.

Try it - I'm sure this is not a book that you will ever regret reading.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon 1 October 2007
Mitch Albom has this knack for writing short books that say so very much.

In 'For one more day' the story revolves around 'Chick' and his relationship with his mother.
Upon coming to the conclusion he has reached rock bottom in life he decides to commit suicide which results in him being united with his dead mother 'for one more day'. It is a very emotional reunion as it causes Chick to think about all the times he'd let her down and picked to stand up for (and please) the father who was never there over the mother who never let him down. He also finds out things about her that he never knew before, the sacrifices she made for him and the reason his parents got divorced....

A lovely book that made me think about all the ways I've let my mom down and taken for granted that she'll always be here. I imagine it will provoke that feeling in a lot of you. This is a great book and I will be recommending it to just about everyone I know!
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
Loved his earlier books, which are filled with poignant insight. I read this one in a single sitting. It might just be my current stage of life but I was really touched by this book. I am not one to typically get emotional when reading a book, but this one got to me.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on 15 January 2007
I thoroughly enjoyed this book, read it from cover to cover in one sitting on a coach journey between London and Gloucester. It has a quiet charm and is very easy reading. I was a little disappointed with this book after reading the 'Five People you meet in Heaven'. It did not seem to create the same emotional resonance within me but I was glad to see this does not seem true of other reviewers.

If you enjoy a catharctic read, love your mother dearly and are looking for the literary equivalent of a massage and a facial then this might just be the book for you....enjoy.
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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
on 29 January 2007
Yep! - Mitch Albom has done it again. Another book that gets you looking deep DEEP inside yourself, and just like his previous two beauties this one juggles your emotions between laughter and tears, and back again.

Charley Benetto is sick of life and is about to commit suicide, but returns to the parental home one more time; his mother is there to put it all into perspective for him, except she died eight years previously!!!

Read it, weep, take notes regarding your own family, then run out and buy the other two books, and do it all over again!
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
on 29 November 2006
I first encountered Mitch Albom in the Detroit Free Press, where I came to greatly enjoy the quality of his sports reporting. Despite this, I only bought his first book (Tuesdays with Morrie) after I had seen the movie of the same name, and even then largely because it starred Jack Lemmon.

I've now read all 3 of Albom's books. Once started, they are inevitably finished within 2 or 3 days (and I'm a slow, very deliberate reader). I've thoroughly enjoyed all 3 of them, and though I don't particularly consider myself a spiritual person, I've found them all to be spiritually uplifting. What does that mean? For me, it means that by the time I've turned the last page I'm determined to be a better person.

'For one more day' was a more difficult read for me than the others, as my mother died earlier this year at the age of 84.

I know the phrase "emotional journey" is overused these days but I don't propose to justify my use of such a phrase by sharing what I have taken out this book, since it is deeply personal.

However, I would like to congratulate the author on a book that is very good in its own right, and to say personally how glad I am to have found it at the end of such a difficult year.

So...thanks Mitch.
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