Customer Reviews


620 Reviews
5 star:
 (423)
4 star:
 (77)
3 star:
 (55)
2 star:
 (15)
1 star:
 (50)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


19 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I CANT RECOMMEND IT ENOUGH
This Book Honestly has changed my financial life! End of Many read it put it away and think it's no good, well not for me, I first read this 7 years ago after struggling and i mean really struggling for years Infact more than a decade, i won't go into detail but the finishing point was loosing a commission only job because of the recession having tens of thousands of...
Published 7 months ago by sharkstooth321

versus
49 of 52 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars OK up to a point
The best thing about this book is that the central message is very clear. Rich people put their money into ASSETS (items which grow in value/ generate income - e.g. stocks, shares, real-estate), whereas worse-off people tend to spend money on LIABILITIES (things that either depreciate or cost money to maintain - e.g. cars, clothes.... and your own house). So far, so...
Published on 22 Jan. 2007 by M. Hayes


‹ Previous | 1 262 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

19 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I CANT RECOMMEND IT ENOUGH, 12 Aug. 2014
This review is from: Rich Dad, Poor Dad: What the Rich Teach Their Kids About Money (Paperback)
This Book Honestly has changed my financial life! End of Many read it put it away and think it's no good, well not for me, I first read this 7 years ago after struggling and i mean really struggling for years Infact more than a decade, i won't go into detail but the finishing point was loosing a commission only job because of the recession having tens of thousands of debt, no credit line, no income huge mortgage to pay wife and child to support, from a poor working class background my financial skills were non exhisant, hence being broke for a decade and now about to loose everything! well thanks to studying this book and the follow ups my mindset changed, i followed the tips, and 7 years on ive paid off all my bad debt myself, kept up with all my payments, made some small investments, have savings, started a small business, live well (although not Rich yet) i'm well on the way and this is still a recession! It can be done from any starting point and 7 years more maybe i will be rich but without starting on the path with this knowledge i have no doubt i'd still be in debt and struggeling probably miserable. Do yourself a massive favour, Buy this Book! take some time out to read it cover to cover, then read it again following the tasks, buy the 2nd book and do the same, then the 3rd you'll have enough info and tips from those 3 books to sort yourself out, join his website, use the worksheets, be honest with yourself don't buy the expensive courses unless you hve loads of income you don't need them, play the free webgame you learn loads, i still play it, GOOD LUCK ITS WORTH IT!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


146 of 153 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not so common sense, 2 Jan. 2002
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Rich Dad, Poor Dad: What the Rich Teach Their Kids About Money (Paperback)
In order to enjoy this book, you'd best put your "capitalist pig" head on. The first sixty pages assume that the best thing you can do from the age of nine is apply yourself to making money. Play baseball? Baseball is for wimps. It's wasting precious time that you could be using applying your brain to thinking up money making schemes. It all started to irritate me, because there clearly is more to life than earning money - but then you wouldn't really be buying this book without wanting to earn a bit more dosh, would you? I'm glad I stuck with it, however, as he does temper this attitude as the book progresses.
You cannot argue with one Kiyosaki's opinions. Our (and the American) education system just does not teach you how to deal with personal finance. If it did, Barclaycard would be in receivership. Understand the value of a pound and make it work for you - it shouldn't be such a distasteful subject. Kiyosaki offers some basic common sense approaches that you could apply in order to make your money work better, but he often qualifies advice by stating the approach may not be right for you. Therefore step one could be Learn to Understand Yourself and Your Motivations. Once you've done that, apply your mind to making money if it interests and excites you. If it doesn't, fair enough. Perhaps the process will help you discover what actually does make you tick.
For those interested in making a stack, then the advice is again about learning. Choose who and what you learn from - teachers, friends, books, tapes, seminars. Look for new approaches. Find people who want to buy and sell something to them. Try to make your profit when you buy, not when you sell. Investigate stocks, real estate, whatever. Find people who can do a good job for you and reward them well. I especially liked his advice that you'll only receive when you learn how to give, and as the book progressed Kiyosaki seemed to "lighten up" a bit more and came across a bit more human. In the later chapters he relates a lot more personal anecdotes and pithy tales about the upsides and downsides of trying to make money. It's not all a bed of roses, but it shouldn't be life or death either. Making money is just a challenge, and you should enjoy it. If you're successful, you can reap the rewards, even if that's choosing to donate it to other people or causes.
In summary, the book is an easy and likeable read. I'm sure most people will get something out it on their road to understanding. Will this book make you rich? Of course not. The only thing that will do that, as the book constantly reminds you, is you, your brain and the action you take.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


49 of 52 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars OK up to a point, 22 Jan. 2007
By 
M. Hayes "Maz" (United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Rich Dad, Poor Dad: What the Rich Teach Their Kids About Money (Paperback)
The best thing about this book is that the central message is very clear. Rich people put their money into ASSETS (items which grow in value/ generate income - e.g. stocks, shares, real-estate), whereas worse-off people tend to spend money on LIABILITIES (things that either depreciate or cost money to maintain - e.g. cars, clothes.... and your own house). So far, so good. The non-rich also waste money by (a) unnecessarily paying too much tax and (b) running up debts on credit (he says its OK to buy the flashy car/ boat etc., but only AFTER you've made money from investing in assets).

However my problem is that the practical advice is very US-centred, in particular some of the tax-avoidance techniques he proposes which are simply NOT legal in the UK (e.g. putting your holiday down as a legitimate business expense if you own your own company... I wish!). I would welcome a UK version of the book. On balance the style is engaging if repetitive (as with many US self-help books). A useful way to start you thinking differently, but I would have liked some more specific recommendations on where to go/ what to do to get started with some of the investment ideas he suggests.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An eye opener for the middle classes, 26 July 2009
This review is from: Rich Dad, Poor Dad: What the Rich Teach Their Kids About Money (Paperback)
I bought this book, which seems to be a bit of a modern-day classic, on a recommendation. Like Allen Carr's giving up smoking book (worked for me, by the way - Allen Carr's Easy Way to Stop Smoking: Be a Happy Non-smoker for the Rest of Your Life (Allen Carrs Easy Way)), the tone may not be to everyone's taste but the message is clear enough. And while that message may not be utterly revolutionary (live off your assets not income - who hasn't dreamt of winning so much on the lottery that they can live richly off the interest alone?), this book contains just enough enthusiasm, anecdote and "this is how to do it" to whet the appetite of anyone who thinks more than most about how they're going to get rich.

However, it is a thin read, light on detail, in places cringe-worthy ("listen more than you talk, that's why God gave us two ears and only one mouth"!) and sometimes morally in a grey area (see sections on insider trading and tax avoidance, note: not evasion). But overall, as someone who has always had an entrepreneurial streak but felt a bit out of the water in the business world due to an "arty" background and a solidly middle-class upbringing, I found this book to be a window into a different mindset.

It has inspired me to read more of the Trumps, Sorells and Buffets of this world, and also to do something about trying to put a bit more of what I earn to work doing things that may reward me more richly down the line.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


21 of 23 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Common Sense Financial Advice But Ignore Knowledge? Na, 10 Mar. 2008
By 
A. O. P. Akemu "Ona" (Rotterdam, The Netherlands) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Rich Dad, Poor Dad: What the Rich Teach Their Kids About Money (Paperback)
If you've never had the common sense to work hard, spend your income within a budget, reduce your debt and save your money in assets, which generate cash in return (making your savings work for you), then this book is for you. Mr Kiyosaki explains how the rich instinctively know these principles and teach them to their kids, whereas the middle class work only to pay bills and keep up with the rat race. Kiyosaki contrasts these attitudes to money using the examples of his poor but highly educated father and his best friend's father, Rich Dad, who was barely educated but rich. Much of his explanation of how to save, budget and invest is good, common sense. There, that's as much praise as I will give Mr Kiyosaki's book.

The author spends the remainder of the book deriding education and gloating over how special he is; how he learnt marketing at Xerox, bought and sold houses, became wealthy and retired at the grand old age of 45. Most of this is harmless twaddle. However, Kiyosaki's thinly-disguised disdain for knowledge - in today's increasingly knowledge-based economy - is unforgivable.

In a world that is increasingly driven by advances in computing, internet technology, biotechnology and knowledge, Mr Kiyosaki's focus on money for money's sake (at the expense of education) is questionable. Yes, money is very important (who would deny that?) but the knowledge and management skill to generate that wealth is equally important.

Let's break down the success of Rich Dad: he was a self-made man, the boss of his own company, which made garments. Not high-tech work but very important alll the same. This model of enterprise is vital and important today, especially in the Third World, but pales in comparison with the success of knowledge-based companies like Google, Amazon and Microsoft, who have created wealth and productivity unprecented in human history.

I suspect that "rich dad", who Kiyosaki lionizes so much in the book, is a product of his fecund imagination. If Rich Dad did exist, then Mr Kiyosaki's real (poor) dad must be ashamed and disgusted. Imagine reading your son's book in which he - your son - claims that you (dad) are a complete loser. To rub salt into the wound, your son also states that the uneducated father of his best friend was his childhood hero. That must have broken his poor father's heart.

We cannot all be entrepreneurs; capital without the necessary knowledge and skill to drive economic growth is useless. We need the combination of both in a fast-changing world. That Mr Kiyosaki chose to ignore knowledge in this equation is almost criminal. By deriding the education of his "poor dad", Mr Kiyosaki lost the plot - and my approval. This book deserves only 2 stars.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


76 of 84 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A Trashy Book from Property Boom, 12 Jun. 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Rich Dad, Poor Dad: What the Rich Teach Their Kids About Money (Paperback)
Sharon Lechter was introduced to Robert Kiyosaki by her husband, a patent lawyer. Koyosaki wanted to patent an educational game called "Cashflow" aimed at improving what he calls young peoples financial intelligence.
One thing leads to another and they eventually collaborated in producing this book which is essentially a financial biography of Kiyosaki. The Rich Dad, Poor Dad of the title are his real father, the superintendent of education for Hawaii (poor) and the businessman father of a schoolfriend (rich).

He says that at age 9 he decided to follow the advice of his rich dad and contrasts it with the advice of his poor dad throughout the book.

For example, poor dad says, "Love of money is the root of all evil", but rich dad says, "The lack of money is the root of all evil" and he follows rich dad, making the money but proving that his poor dad was right on the moral aspects.

Rich dad says, "The rich don't pay taxes, that's only for the poor and middle class", or Kiyosaki; "In real estate I make an offer with the words, "Subject to approval of my business partner" ...... and if they accept the offer and I don't want the deal I call my (non existent) business partner"

And rich dad again: He hugs a manageress in one of his shops and says that she is like a mother to him, then in the next breath gives a warning that "you'll wind up like Mrs Martin". He could have said that he respected her for her loyalty and good work but he clearly doesn't.
If Kiyosaki had been aboard the Titanic you would have found him hiding behind the women and children in the first life raft, but in non critical situations he has some useful things to say about financial management.

His idea that an asset is only an asset if it makes you money is a good one. If you take a large mortgage to buy a private residence, then it is a drain on your resources, although an accountant would class it as an asset.

He's also good on the importance of clear thinking. As he says, "Most people do not know that it is their emotions that are doing the thinking."

The book is aimed at young people but should come with a double warning. Firstly that the writer is dishonest and secondly that the "less travelled road" of business ownership is very risky for less imaginative people than Kiyosaki.

A far better choice is Sam Walton's Sam Walton : Made in America My Story. He was way ahead of Kiyosaki on ethics and financial success.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


73 of 81 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars If you want to know the mechanics, look elsewhere, 29 Dec. 2003
By 
Caroline Anne Perks (Lancashire, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
A very readable book. However, for those of you looking for advice on the mechanics of putting together an alternative income source, look elsewhere. This book is geared to encouraging you to do so, and telling you why you should, rather than actually how to do it. More of a motivational tool. Some of the financial aspects don't travel across the Atlantic too well either.
The book's main points are
You won't get rich in the rat race (but you knew that already)
You won't get rich by building debt
You should acquire assets (income generators) rather than liabilities (things you have to pay for like houses with mortgages, cars and so on) and do this before you buy luxuries (i.e. invest then spend, not spend and have nothing left to invest)
You should keep your eyes open for investment opportunities (obviously)
Higher risk can give higher return - you won't get rich based on a savings account
All pretty obvious stuff, if you really think about it.
All in all, somewhat disappointing, as it lacked meat on the bones IMHO. I wouldn't mind betting that the Rich Dad Poor Dad brand is doing considerably better for him than dealing in condos in Phoenix.....
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Motivational & entertaining reading, 10 April 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Rich Dad, Poor Dad: What the Rich Teach Their Kids About Money (Paperback)
This book made me angry at first because I felt inadequate and stupid to keep going to work for a salary instead of enjoying wealth and financial independence like Robert T. Kiyosaki. But soon afterwards that feeling was replaced by motivation. It has made me sign up for a short course in the subject at a London university and to search for information on the internet. I feel confident I can do it. It is going to take time (surely a few years) but the book has everything you need to get started.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


63 of 70 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is what we should teach our kids!, 11 Sept. 2006
By 
A. Brown "Andy Brown" (Surrey, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Rich Dad, Poor Dad: What the Rich Teach Their Kids About Money (Paperback)
Robert Kiyosaki has produced a very readable book explaining many of the fundamental differences between wealthy and poor people. He makes very good use of repetition to ensure that his points are firmly `sent home'. Although this can be annoying at times, particularly when concepts are already familiar to the reader, it's easy to skip over the repetition and move on to the new concepts.

It is a simple book to read, and requires no particular financial or academic background. However, the concepts introduced are very powerful, and, if taken to heart, life changing. The book traces the author's life from the age of 9, comparing the financial teaching that he received from his own, highly academically intelligent, real dad, and that of his friend's, financially intelligent, dad. Having experienced first hand the teaching and upbringing resulting from both of the dads, he is able to reflect on how they differ and how these differences have a profound effect on financial wealth.

The book is written from an American perspective, but the concepts and ideas are universally applicable, certainly in all Western societies. It explains how the poor and middle-class pay much more in taxes than the rich and how most people, including many of our advisors, do not understand the difference between assets and liabilities. He makes good use of simple diagrams to explain the relationship between income, expenditure, assets and liabilities.

RK firmly believes in education, but also believes that the education system does not teach financial intelligence. This book, and indeed all of the books in the Rich Dad Poor Dad series, is about filling this gap in the system, and trying to help people who want to be helped, out of the rut of a `safe secure job' into the freedom of real wealth.

I think almost everyone will benefit from reading this book, whether still at school, or later in life wondering why they seem to be still poor after working hard all their life, and everyone else in-between!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


80 of 89 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Not worth the effort, 28 Mar. 2002
This review is from: Rich Dad, Poor Dad: What the Rich Teach Their Kids About Money (Paperback)
I had heard about this book and decided to do some research of my own, sure enough there are about equal amounts of people who either like his views or see them as complete rubbish.
I find that the basis behind the book is good, the idea of "paying yourself first", not relying on your job to provide for you, buying assets that will make money rather than buying things that make more bills for you. This is surely common sense and Robert spends a long time on this. While he does go into detail, he spends an astonishing amount of time before he gets to the point.
The majority of this book centres around how he (supposedly) makes his money but I found it a bit unfair, unnerving almost, the way he went about it.
The book is written in a gloating fashion, "My assets bought me my porsche" I found this a bit like rubbing peoples faces in the fact he had a lot more money than we the readers (and the fact youve bought this book means your helping him buy the next one).
I like the way he explains the difference between incomings and outgoings in his diagrams, but again this book is written for an american audience so about 1/3 of his book will not apply here in good old blighty.
Some of his statements about education too I find disturbing, he almost recommends dropping out of school and learning about money in order to be better off. I find this irresponsible and dangerous. I certainly would not want my son to read any of this material.
If you, like me are looking at a way of clearing your debts and getting yourself steady in order to start saving or investing, there are better, simpler books on the market. My personal recommendations are: The Richest man in Babylon by George Clayson, or the Motley Fools "How to invest when you dont have any money" these are much better books geared more to our UK market and are more likely to help you on the way to a secure financial future.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 262 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Rich Dad, Poor Dad: What the Rich Teach Their Kids About Money
Rich Dad, Poor Dad: What the Rich Teach Their Kids About Money by Sharon L. Lechter (Paperback - 3 Jan. 2002)
Used & New from: £0.01
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews