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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sorry - we're going to have to let you go
A great work of fiction about triumph over adversity as the world of Peter Hallam (sales manager) falls apart and his subsequent revenge against those who have betrayed him.
This book has wonderful comic situations, particularly as Hallam starts to get his revenge.
My favourite character was Moncia, Hallam's wonderfully potty Mother-in-law who spends her days...
Published on 18 Jan 2003

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Bonfire of the Vanities meets Terry and June
I'm Sorry We're Going to Have to Let You Go is nothing if not a comfortable book. On first encountering the protagonists, there is a reassuring feeling of familiarity. In truth, the characters could have been lifted from most sitcoms of the eighties, at any moment you expect Richard Briers or William Gaunt to pop up. It is the story of Peter Hallam,a happy middle...
Published on 2 Jun 1999


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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Bonfire of the Vanities meets Terry and June, 2 Jun 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Sorry - We're Going To Have To Let You Go (Paperback)
I'm Sorry We're Going to Have to Let You Go is nothing if not a comfortable book. On first encountering the protagonists, there is a reassuring feeling of familiarity. In truth, the characters could have been lifted from most sitcoms of the eighties, at any moment you expect Richard Briers or William Gaunt to pop up. It is the story of Peter Hallam,a happy middle class, middle management man, whose idyllic life in suburbia is shattered by the arrival at work of a young, ageist, racist Thatcherite Managing Director. He shares his house with an perfect wife and daughter, an anti-social, drop-out son, and his sweetly batty mother-in-law. The mother and daughter make lovely lunches, the son makes speeches about patriarchal behaviour and the mother-in-law makes up rude limericks. So far so good. With the new boss's arrival, though, he is bullied into resignation, and his descent into unemployed depression, abandonment by his wife, derision from his son and rejection by his peers commences. So far so fairly familair. That the book succeeds is really thanks to the plot. As with the Bonfire of the Vanities, when the hero has hit rock bottom, you know there is only one way that he can go, and it is usually worth sticking around to see it. The revenges he concocts are genuinely amusing, and the bond which he develops with his mother-in-law is touching, if less than surprising. Lord's refusal to challenge the accepted truth of any of the stock characters he uses is frustrating, though...In general it is a thoroughly amusing, well plotted, thoroughly unremarkable book. If Dick Francis ever turned his hand to comedy, he'd write this book. How long before the sitcom comes out?
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sorry - we're going to have to let you go, 18 Jan 2003
By A Customer
A great work of fiction about triumph over adversity as the world of Peter Hallam (sales manager) falls apart and his subsequent revenge against those who have betrayed him.
This book has wonderful comic situations, particularly as Hallam starts to get his revenge.
My favourite character was Moncia, Hallam's wonderfully potty Mother-in-law who spends her days drinking, smoking and placing bets with the help of her cactus Hank!
Jason Skudder and Hallam's son, whilst awful characters are believable and well written.
I don't unsually read fiction, but this had me hooked from the start. Hallam's fall is at times painful to read but I found myself cheering as one by one he saw off those who had turned against him in some truly amusing ways.
Well worth the money.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Genuinely funny novel about the world of work, 9 Sep 2011
This review is from: Sorry - We're Going To Have To Let You Go (Paperback)
I actually laughed out loud when reading this novel. The situations the writer describes are so true of the world of work today - from the croneyism and corruption, to the political correctness and pandering - that I think anyone can recognise various characters in it (and perhaps even themselves).

One reviewer complains that the characters are not original. Well, so what? Read ANY literary novel and, guess what - the characters have all been seen before: the wronged wife, the mystical child, the mid-life crisis man etc etc etc.

Characters in books are ALL archetypes and stereotypes, I would argue - which is why we recognise them and enjoy the situations they find themselves in.

So what if the main character is the typical 'loser' character - that is a British tradition, and includes Gulliver, Frank Spencer et al. Americans don't get this at all, of course - how a loser and an underdog can be a hero. Ah well...

The horrid and vile managerial class in the workplace is exposed in all its gory glory here - and it's all so true! Most people who work in institutions have experienced incompetent (and often very young) managers being parachuted into managerial roles, often through contacts and croneyism. Many people know just how AWFUL the world of work really is, especially is our Americanised target culture.

The story here and the characters are great. It's a REALLY enjoyable read. Won't win any literary prizes, but so what? It's one of the funniest novels I have read in the last decade.

I'd much rather read a book like this than most literary novels published today, with their complete lack of story, their utter lack of comedy or enjoyment, and pompous and pretentious post-modern tricksiness.

If you want to read a seriously funny book, then try this one. You'll definitely enjoy it. Five stars.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Mostly good but rather rushed towards the end, 13 July 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Sorry - We're Going To Have To Let You Go (Paperback)
What a shame. Lord spends 250 pages setting up entirely believable, well rounded characters and weaving a compelling story. Unfortunately the story then degenerates into a Terry & June-esque style pantomime farce. It is a real pity because for most of the book this genuinely talented author nearly manages to produce a gem. Still , very much worth a read.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not as funny as promised, 20 Sep 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Sorry - We're Going To Have To Let You Go (Paperback)
Perhaps the subject matter was too close to home for me, but I failed to find much of the humour the book jacket promised. The characters and situations were just too unreal, and it reads like a script for a sitcom series, with little attempt at building any depth in the characters. Too long is spent building the situation, so that I started to skip about a third of the way through, and too little is devoted to the much more interesting and satisfactory ending. Patrick Connolly covers vaguely similar ground and is much funnier.
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Sorry - We're Going To Have To Let You Go
Sorry - We're Going To Have To Let You Go by Graham Lord (Paperback - 13 May 1999)
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