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46 of 47 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Analysis
Nobody who writes on the subject of Richard III is ever impartial; no matter how unbiased they claim to be. This is also true of Bertram Fields. But after reading Alison Weir's "Princes in the Tower" his writing came as a breath of fresh air. Other reviewers complained about his sustained attack on Miss Wier's book, but I felt that it was justified. He analysed her...
Published on 17 Feb. 2005

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10 of 24 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Nothing new
I was interested, but unsurprised, that previous reviewers rated this a 5-star book. Richard III tends to generate an extreme reaction - you either love him or hate him!
I have an open-mind on the 'mystery of the princes'. Having read Mr Fields' book, I am still undecided, as 'Royal Blood' contains no new evidence either way.
My major concern, which made me...
Published on 3 Mar. 2001


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46 of 47 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Analysis, 17 Feb. 2005
By A Customer
Nobody who writes on the subject of Richard III is ever impartial; no matter how unbiased they claim to be. This is also true of Bertram Fields. But after reading Alison Weir's "Princes in the Tower" his writing came as a breath of fresh air. Other reviewers complained about his sustained attack on Miss Wier's book, but I felt that it was justified. He analysed her arguments well. Unlike many writers on the subject Mr Fields does not avoid evidence or facts that don't fit in with his general view. Everything is analysed and every probable interpratation is examined...just what was needed as no one theory on Richard or the princes fits all the facts known. Essential reading.
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28 of 29 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Richard guilty?, 11 Dec. 2004
By 
J. Leigh "jleighf14a" (Lancashire) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I have always been fascinated by this period of history and, whilst it could be said that I suffer from a Red-rose bias, I approached this book with an open mind. It shows how easy it is to distort history and portray a person as a villain by simply ignoring some of the evidence available. Bertram Fields disects the evidence and arguments to give a balanced view which allows the reader to make up their own mind on the matter.
Perhaps we shall never know who was responsible for the deaths of the young Princes, but this book has led me to question Richard's guilt, which means that I shall read more on this subject.
Read, enjoy and make your own mind up.
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23 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It is history, not fiction, 3 Feb. 2008
This review is from: Royal Blood: King Richard III & the Mystery of the Princes: King Richard III and the Mystery of the Princes (Paperback)
This book is exactly what I was looking for: Easy to read, a page turnover and a history book. There is not fiction there, just facts. For years I have been deeply interested in English history and you can find so many fictional books around there that provides you information you do not know if it is really true or false. This book just give you facts.
I wish I could came across more books like this one.
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28 of 30 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars On the strength of this book,-NOT GUILTY!!!, 4 Mar. 2005
I come originally from the fair county of Leicestershire and have been fascinated with the life of Richard III since discovering at the age of 5 that British history changed so dramatically on 22 August 1485 just down the road from where I lived at Bosworth Field.No jury in the Western World could possibly find the Prime Suspect,Richard, guilty in this most fascinating of historical crime cases on the strength of this book.

Meticulously researched and written extremely well, the evidence of the key witness for the prosecution, Alison Wier, a writer of great acclaim is however, discredited on balance by an argument which is extremely watertight.

Richard had a very weak motive for the murder of his nephews as this book points out and further points to Henry VII as the person with the most to lose should the prices have survived. Henry has motive therefore and ample opportunity.

But, is Fields right? Did it all happen as he says? We shall never truly know but as in all cases, where there is a shred of doubt as there now is in the case of the Richard, the last king to die in battle, thanks to this book, he must be found on the balance of probability, posthumously not guilty!!

A great book with all the intrigue of a modern thriller and a welcome conunterbalance to the "Richard is Guilty" view held by most books on the topic.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Its in here somewhere......., 30 Mar. 2013
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I have to admit I havent finished reading this book yet. But already I am certain that this must be one of the best books on the topic ever written. I love the writing style, each piece of evidence is brought before the reader, carefully weighing and balancing each personality. Each source is considered and valued for potential insight, bias, timing, environment and possible motive. The intellect supporting this analysis is clear to see, yet the material is presented with independent observation, without obfuscation or a pre-determined position to present/defend. I like that approach. It's clear and open.

It's out of print as I write this, and Im surprised that publication has been allowed to lapse with all the car park hoo-hah going on at the moment. I was able to track a 2nd hand copy down from Amazon in the USA, at a significant but not unfair price, but some prices on here seem absolutely ludicrous. Beware of paying too much for it. Its good, but it's not dozens of pounds good. There are modern alternatives worth considering until this comes back into print.

Its a great book, please bring it back into print, where it belongs.
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Trial of Richard III, 21 Oct. 2004
By 
Mrs. D. J. Smith "eowyngreenleaf" (Luton, England) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Royal Blood (Hardcover)
Some years ago - too many for me to remember! - Channel 4 Broadcast a Trial of Richard III, where he was found Not Guilty of the supposed murders of the Princes in the Tower. American entertainment lawyer, Bertram Fields, here takes up the Trial idea and presents us with a highly readable analysis of the known facts of the case and concludes that it may be possible that Richard did kill his nephews, but the evidence is inconclusive, and there are other contenders!
I would probably advise that you have some background knowledge on the Wars of the Roses, as this book is an analysis of evidence rather than a retelling of the story. Anyone who has read Weir's The Princes in the Tower will see her arguments carefully analysed and deconstructed.
Available evidence is examined, theories are considered and the bias of available 'witnesses' is weighed up. This case is one where few people are without bias, one way or the other, but I feel that Fields does a pretty good job of basing everything on evidence and remaining as impartial as possible. In the end there is no definite conclusion, but there is enough presented for you to have your own opinion. Was it Richard or Buckingham or the usurper Henry Tudor or where the princes not murdered at all? Plenty of food for thought.
Field concludes with a 'What If' scenario, considering from what we know and can conjecture, what might have happened if Richard had not taken the throne. Of course, we can never know for certain, but it is interesting to consider what a different world we might be living in from a change in events over 500 years ago!
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliantly debated, painstakingly researched, 21 Oct. 2000
By 
Roz Bailey (Hampshire, England) - See all my reviews
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I cannot praise this innovative, brilliantly written and scholarly book enough. The research has been meticulous, which is, in itself, a major surprise considering the usual unsupported assumptions written about King Richard the Third. I found that Mr Fields' application of modern legal skills to the complexities of the events of the period absolutely eye-opening. I thought I knew most if not all known facts about King Richard, but Mr Fields not only gave me a whole new view of several points that I believed I fully understood, he also revealed several important facts of which I was quite unaware and have not come across in any other literature relating to the King. I would hope that if I were ever to appear in a court of law that Mr Fields would be representing me and not standing for my opponent.
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A fair-handed account of Richard III's guilt, 9 Aug. 2010
This review is from: Royal Blood: King Richard III & the Mystery of the Princes: King Richard III and the Mystery of the Princes (Paperback)
I bought this book on the strength of other positive reviews and I must say, I wasn't disappointed.

The book gives a very thorough and comprehensive account of the events surrounding Richard III's reign and the disappearance of the princes from the Tower. The author has clearly done his research and done so extensively, however the writing flows very well and the pace is good. One of the later chapters concerning the discovery of bones during building work at the Tower was a little harder to follow but it did not detract from the book overall.

As I was reading the book, there were times when I worried that the author was pro-Ricardian but felt relieved when his conclusion was very fair and balanced. He also seemed particularly unflattering about the biases displayed in Allison Weir's book on the same subject and did not feel shy about expressing his criticism which eventually became something of a running joke. However, having now read Weir's book, I feel that such criticism is entirely justified!

I thoroughly recommend this book to anyone interested in Richard III and the disappearance of the princes. Although I have an interest in the War of the Roses, I hadn't previously read much on Richard III or the princes and so would thoroughly recommend this book to those looking to develop their knowledge and understanding of one of England's most (probably unfairly) maligned kings.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars would recommend this book, 2 Jun. 2004
By A Customer
The book was not a challenging read but certainly informative and entertaining. Itis always refreshing to read another interpretation of commonly held historical facts, and as the book was written in a less academic style I felt it was highly accessible.
A previous reviewer mentioned Field's somewhat frequent attack on the Weir book. I have not read 'Princes in the Tower', although I am familiar with some of Weir's other work, (which quite frankly I did not rate)
Any book that encourages people to take an interest in the reading of history is, in my opinion, of great value. I have already recommended this book to a colleague and would encourage anyone else to read it.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars royal blood: king richard III and the mystery of the princes, 1 Jun. 2009
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This review is from: Royal Blood: King Richard III & the Mystery of the Princes: King Richard III and the Mystery of the Princes (Paperback)
Enjoyed a different way of writing about this age old mystery. Felt that it was an honest an un-biased opinion.
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