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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very special book
This is one of my favourite books on Imperial Russia, Charlotte Zeepvat introduces new underdiscovered members of this family like Grand Princess Elena and Princess Helen of Serbia who both married in to the Imperial family. I have read this book many times and have given it to a lot of my friends who do not have the interest in the Romanov family that I have but they...
Published on 8 April 2007 by Thomas Dee-Fraser

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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Portraits of the Romanov dynasty
This is the second book on the latter years of the Romanov dynasty from Sutton Publishing within two years, and it is interesting to compare them. The first, by Van der Kiste, tells the story in one chronological narrative from the birth of Alexander II in 1818 to the death of his his youngest daughter in 1959. This, on the other hand, is basically a collection of...
Published on 6 Sept. 2000


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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Portraits of the Romanov dynasty, 6 Sept. 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Romanov Autumn: Stories from the Last Century of Imperial Russia (Hardcover)
This is the second book on the latter years of the Romanov dynasty from Sutton Publishing within two years, and it is interesting to compare them. The first, by Van der Kiste, tells the story in one chronological narrative from the birth of Alexander II in 1818 to the death of his his youngest daughter in 1959. This, on the other hand, is basically a collection of articles on members of the family, and while it is fun to dip into, it does involve a certain amount of overlapping and repetition in referring to events. Ms Zeepvat's enthusiasm for and insight into their personalities is evident, but I found her text sometimes lacking in objectivity, as if she is so passionately devoted to her subjects that she cannot bear to say a word against any of them. The defensive account of Grand Duke Serge in this book rings less true than the harsher, more detached and arguably more realistic analysis of his character in the other title. Her line drawings are attractive, but the quality of some of the plates leaves much to be desired. Also I agree with the previous reviewer; her insistence on using the Russian names (e.g. Pavel for Paul) is distracting, and her obsession with 'Grand Prince' in preference to 'Grand Duke' irritating. She expends considerable energy in the front of the book explaining why, but it all seems rather unnecessary. Other authors have followed the Anglicised names and 'Grand Duke' style for years, so what is the point of being different for the sake of it? ...
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very special book, 8 April 2007
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This is one of my favourite books on Imperial Russia, Charlotte Zeepvat introduces new underdiscovered members of this family like Grand Princess Elena and Princess Helen of Serbia who both married in to the Imperial family. I have read this book many times and have given it to a lot of my friends who do not have the interest in the Romanov family that I have but they have all enjoyed it. Buy this book you won,t be dissappointed.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent short histories of the Romanov family, 3 Feb. 2006
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This review is from: Romanov Autumn: Stories from the Last Century of Imperial Russia (Hardcover)
Charlotte Zeepvat is an exquisite historian. She has just the right touch of sympathy for her subjects, and prefers to let the facts speak for themselves, thanks to her thorough historical research. I haven't read a bad book by her, to date. This book lets the reader find out more about the wider Romanov family; that it was more than just Nicholas and Alexandra. In fact, it is very useful to read this book because it lets you understand more about Nicholas and Alexandra, why and how they became the way they were...who knew that Nicholas' parents had such a rocky beginning, being practically compelled to marry, and that they both loved other people? Who knew the family was so divided toward the end; that Grand Duchess Marie Pavlovna and her circle was such a divisive influence? A lot of misconceptions are cleared up here, and all with the lightest touch. Very well written and informative.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars fantastic, 3 Oct. 2007
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S. Akram - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Romanov Autumn: Stories from the Last Century of Imperial Russia (Hardcover)
This is a fantastic book absolutely worth buying a rare gem amongst all the books to be written about the Romanovs. The book brings all the characters to life and as you read it you can image the events taking place right before your eyes. The author sheds light on members of the family who have before rarely been mentioned. this book is an absolute must for ROMANOV FANATICS!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A fascinating outlook on the last century of imperial Russia, 13 July 2011
This book provides an extremely interesting insight into the lives and homes of the Romanov family. Charlotte Zeepvat introduces us to less known family members who played important parts in the last century of imperial Russia along with telling us about their palaces and how those palace came to be their homes.
I found this book, Zeepvat's "The Camera and the Tsars", to be full of interesting facts that I hadn't read in any other books that follow this period. This is a must for any Romanov Library and I strongly recommend it to anyone who likes this period in history.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars easy to read, 9 Aug. 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Romanov Autumn: Stories from the Last Century of Imperial Russia (Hardcover)
I enjoyed this book very much. I liked the author's approach of having several short vignettes about various Romanov characters, their homes, even their servants. It is an easy book to dip into and you can read the chapters out of sequence, thus reading about your favourites first! Funnily enough, whereas in her last book on Prince Leopold I found her own drawings rather irksome (see reviews), in this book they are enchanting and form a beautiful beginning to each chapter. The only thing that I found difficult was the author's insistence on going against tradition and calling the Grand Dukes and Duchesses with the title 'Grand Prince' or 'Grand Princess' - she justifies her actions well in the introduction but nevertheless it does irritate, as does her insistence on not using the Anglicised versions of their names, eg Ekaterina instead of Catherine, Pavel instead of Paul etc. Call me old fashioned....! Nevertheless, once you get over that hurdle this is an absorbing read.
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6 of 12 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A rehash of all the others, 8 Nov. 2001
By A Customer
I was disappointed with Ms Zeepvats portrayal of the final decades of the Romanov dynasty. Most of the chapters are based on articles the author had written in a royalty pamphlet published monthly in Britain. There is very little that is new and most is just a rehashing of every thing that has been written about them since the revolution. The book also has too much fluff and there are parts where the author attempts to create an almost dream like fantasy as she attempts to walk the reader through the private worlds of these very interesting and sometimes complex individuals. The author claims to be an expert on the Romanovs but her academic training fails to shine through in this less than satisfactory attempt at one of the world's most fascinationg and controversial dynasties. She should stick to writing pamphlets.
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Romanov Autumn: Stories from the Last Century of Imperial Russia
Romanov Autumn: Stories from the Last Century of Imperial Russia by Charlotte Zeepvat (Hardcover - 23 Mar. 2000)
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