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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "So you wanna be a rock and roll star..."
Rock biographies are not known for their literary excellence.Usually ghost written they are often vain and self absorbed and good only for the bargain buckets.
This then is a remarkable achievement.In "One train later" Andy Summers tells the tale of a struggling musician with such verve and clarity that you are willing him to be the success he ultimately was...
Published on 29 Oct 2006 by Bluegirl

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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good story....despite
Well I nearly didn't get past page 20 but I'm glad I persisted. At first I thought Andy Summers had swallowed a thesaurus and was determined to cough most of it back up. I don't know if he thought he needed to introduce obscure words ("fuliginous vinyl" anyone?) or clunky phrases ("he makes the purchase of" - what's wrong with "buys"?) to establish his literary...
Published on 15 Jan 2007 by Phiz Boz


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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "So you wanna be a rock and roll star...", 29 Oct 2006
Rock biographies are not known for their literary excellence.Usually ghost written they are often vain and self absorbed and good only for the bargain buckets.
This then is a remarkable achievement.In "One train later" Andy Summers tells the tale of a struggling musician with such verve and clarity that you are willing him to be the success he ultimately was.
As a teenager I was a huge Police fan and Summers was my favourite-even then he appeared to be taking the fame with humour and good grace.
The highs and lows are well documented, the madness of the 60's highly evocative but it is the story of The Police which will touch readers of any generation.
An astonishingly well written book and recommended to anyone who thinks they might want to be in a band.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A brilliant story by one of rock's great Zeligs, 29 Aug 2007
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This review is from: One Train Later: A memoir (Paperback)
I always knew Andy Summmers had had a bit of a history before joining The Police but I never knew it was so long and fascinating. From being a perenial nearly man of rock, he alighted from the same train as Stewart Copeland and the rest ........
In 'Book 1' he describes his early jazz and psychedelic period including encounters with Clapton, Hendrix (relegating him to playing bass) and Burdon. Some of his andectotes are so incredible, you have to wonder how much license he's employed but the stories are great and the vision of a teenage Summers chasing Hank Marvin down the street had me in fits. 'Book 2' looks at his career to 1983 with The Police and documents the decadent excesses that cost him his marriage.

In telling the tales about his guitars, including his iconic 'telestratocaster', he gives a great insight to his influences, his techniques and his choice of 'weapon'.

As well as a guitar player, Summers displays his skills here as a good writer whose style compares well with any a good fantasy / fiction author. This was a can't put down book for me. Massively recommended for guitarists, Police fans, romantics and anyone who likes a good tale told well.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars one train later ..a sublime journey, 23 Oct 2006
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Mr. J. Fulton (united kingdom) - See all my reviews
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This book is an absolute treat , if you love music ,guitars i highly reccomend this book for those reasons alone but it gets better the book is written with such passion you will enjoy reading it even if you have never even heard of andy summers , somehow the iconic author manages to pull off one of the best musical memoirs ever written its laced with nostalgic childhood memories and rich in musical history , it really is a fascinating journey documenting the life and career of a passionate man ,without the usual pontificating typical of many biographies , you actually learn something its very informative ,emotional and there is no shortage of humour , i simply couldn,t put the book down , i enjoyed it from cover to cover .*****
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Rush job? But good anyway!, 13 July 2010
This review is from: One Train Later: A memoir (Paperback)
Having just finished One Train Later, I am both nostalgic for The Police and their music, and simultaneously left feeling that this thumping big book (444 pages) could have been more carefully put together. I don't blame its excellent author, the great Andy Summers, but suspect rather that this work may have been put out in a little bit of haste, in order to raise awareness of the band before the (then) forthcoming Police reunion tour.

It's a great read, let down slightly by some glaring errors and typo's. :

For example, although he is a bit vague on actually stating the year at various points in the early part of his book, Mr Summers gives his age next birthday as "23" when he would have been several years older than that (end of the 1960s). At no point does he mention being born in 1942 although this is common knowledge and nothing to be concealed in any way. In a later chapter, Slovenia is called a "Baltic" state, when it is, of course, a BALKAN state! A little later still, and we have the cheerful translation (albeit in a jestful mood) of "The Police" as "EL Policia", when it should be "La Policia". Picky? Maybe. But in an otherwise fine work, it's a shame that someone, not necessarily the author, let these howlers through. Perhaps the proof-readers had the music turned up too loud or something.

Similarly, there are rather a large number of typographical errors, too numerous and tedious to reproduce here.

However, DON'T BE PUT OFF! I've given this book 5 stars because it's an insightful revelation of Andy Summers the man, not just the rock guitarist and he's a really interesting man. Like any rock personage, he's been through the usual temptations, regrets, rages, habits, etc., but there's a happy ending - so please don't turn to the last chapter until you get there! Along the way this book will entertain you with personal history, great anecdotes and hearty humour throughout.

All in all, thoroughly recommended, especially if, unlike me, you can turn off your pedantism and ignore mistakes. Enjoy!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Summers in "rock star can actually write" shock, 23 Nov 2007
By 
Mike Wade (London, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: One Train Later: A memoir (Paperback)
This book could not have been better written had it been written by someone who's passport stated Occupation: Writer.
Told without the slightly self-serving tone that imbues many rock biographies, including elements of the one recently produced by Mr Summers' erstwhile bass player, this tells a terrific story terrifically well.
Being a bit of a musician, I loved it. My wife, who isn't, also loved it.
Buy it. Love it. As you can see, it's statistically probable.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars From hired hand to mega star, a truly fantastic read., 24 Sep 2013
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This review is from: One Train Later: A memoir (Paperback)
The life and times of Andy Summers, from his early days with Zoot Money to his final gig with the Police at Madison Square Gardens and everything in between.
A must read for anyone with an interest in the rock and roll business.
Andy's gift for writing puts you in the dank dark dressing rooms of his youth.
His use of words is so good you can almost smell the fear, excitement and joy of his life.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great autobiography of experience, 3 Sep 2010
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Andy Summers' autobiography is a great recollection as a guitarist in the midst of a famous life of sex, drugs (he took a lot!) and rock n roll. He writes intelligently and sometimes humorously. After reading Sting's autobiography/memoirs this was an obvious choice for me. Whereas Andy's rise to fame was on quite a different path than Sting's, Andy's memoirs fill in where Sting stopped. Whereas Sting talked about life in The Police only in the early days, Andy takes us through the career of the band up to Shea Stadium in August 1983, and there's also an afterward. The book cleverly revolves around the concert at Shea Stadium where they were the 1st band to play there since the Beatles and were at the height of their success. Andy talks from time to time about the whole day until he steps out onto the stage and this is tied in with the rest of his life. The autobiography is complemented with his own pictures from throughout his career which gives us a more personal look into his story. This is a must read for any fan of The Police where Andy talks about the parts of fame that Sting left out, takes us off through the career of the Police where Sting stopped (which I was disappointed about with Sting`s autobiography) and takes us into the heady days of the band when they were the most famous band in the world at the time, where the media and fans alike where all over them. He talks about a band with democracy where they were passionate enough to argue about the music and what they wanted to put into the albums, to it being somewhat of a dictatorship with Sting in charge, where Andy genuinely expresses that he felt somewhat left out and in another person's band.

Andy Summers' memoirs are a frank and real view of life as a guitarist before and within The Police. Andy takes us through his whole career up until and including `83 and tells fantastic stories of his way to the top and the feelings of the inevitable break-up of the band. Whereas maybe Sting didn't want to delve into the murky waters Andy does so finely and evokes his feelings of the band and the other members. It really gives you an insight into what his life was like in The Police. Andy of course talks about what it was like growing up in 50's and his life in many different bands. Andy tells many wonderful and interesting stories and in some parts it seems quite farfetched and unrealistic. For example his close encounters with Jimi Hendrix and how he chased Hank Marvin down the street for an autograph. However, it is an entertaining and mostly real view of his life. I can say that Andy's autobiography is a lot more frank and to the point than Sting's usually and Andy mostly tells it like it his; giving us his realistic and sometimes negative view of things. He talks about his struggle in small hippie bands; a few which were out for themselves, and others which he had more fun in, to having to have bodyguards around you because you are so famous. Andy also talks about his encounters with the real Police and his antics in a whirlwind of fame.

It's also interesting that this book was written before the reunion tour and this gives us a different perspective on things. Andy is very nostalgic in the afterword and this makes you long for The Police and sympathise with him. This autobiography is quite a long read, but it's broken up with whit and colourful story-telling. It's a great read for fans of The Police and guitarists alike.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars From Bournemouth to LA and back again..., 15 Aug 2008
By 
BD "bigdave2020" (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: One Train Later: A memoir (Paperback)
This book by Andy Summers is quite simply an amazing and engrossing book. I honestly couldn't put it down, taking it everywhere with me just in case I could grab a few minutes to read some more. It is a long time since any book I have bought or borrowed has had me hooked to that degree.

This account by Andy has all the details of a gripping account of rock and roll life and is far from a `then I did this, then I did that' style of book, which many memoirs and autobiographies can have. The construction is clever with the story flicking between a `past future' moment before the legendary Police Shea Stadium gig, and events leading up to that in 'real time' in terms of the tales being told. As with all memoirs certain parts are of course to be taken with a pinch of salt, but I can see why this was the Mojo magazine book of the year. There is the story of Andy selling a certain Mr Clapton a guitar which is claimed to have partially formed Eric's legendary technique and sound. Tales of early loves lost and later found again after the madness of the police years, the digs and rooms rented and the experiences within, it is all there.

Even as a lifelong fan of the police, I had never appreciated just how long Andy had been a hard working musician with such legends as Zoot Money, The Animals, Neil Sedaka and countless other tours and gigs before making it big (and boy did he!) in the late 70's\early 80's with the Police. Having now read this book I appreciate the police's musical output to an even greater degree. It inspired me to dig out all my old vinyl and CD's and given them a fresh airing with fresh ears. Some of Andy's comments on the albums the Police made also match my own thoughts. Regatta de Blanc remains my favourite too.

Thanks for the memories Andy, your music was amazing, and the book will take some beating too.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best books of its genre., 30 April 2007
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P. Miller (UK) - See all my reviews
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Let's face it, many books that chart the life of musicians are ghost written, dull and read like a list of gigs with a few minor details added. This book is very differeny and that difference makes it stand out from the crowd. Sure, it reads at times like a creative writing course essay, but it has one huge advantage; Andy Summers writes from the heart. His deep and emnotional link to music really hits you as you read and you find as you progress through the book that you begin to care more and more. When he describes an early guitar being stolen or the birth of his child, there is real emotion and meaning there. Ok, so at times it looks like the Theasaurus has been a bit overused, but the end result is entertaining and so much deeper than anything I've seen before.

Thank you Andy - The Police were the first band I ever saw live and now I've started to learn the guitar (albeit way too late!)in no small part down to this book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars So glad you caught that train andy!, 5 Jan 2007
By 
Mr. G. F. Davis "GARY DAVIS" (Herts, united kingdom) - See all my reviews
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Having been an ardent police fan for the past 30 years i was eagerly looking forward to andys memoirs, and i wasn"t dissapointed. the good thing about this book was that he doesn"t take himself too seriously, the stories from his earlier career with the animals, zoot money and kevin coyne were fascinating, and how he eventually met up with sting and stewart copeland was just destiny. if anything this was even better than stings broken music, and i am a big sting fan, so well done andy. for anyone who loves music and the police this is the book for you, ten out of ten for me! and hurry up with the 30 year reunion?
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One Train Later: A memoir
One Train Later: A memoir by Andy Summers (Paperback - 5 July 2007)
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