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4.3 out of 5 stars31
4.3 out of 5 stars
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on 3 April 1998
Moore's book is an excellent guide which points the way to personal enrichment. The criticisms made of it, such as lack of academic thoroughness are valid in so far as it would have been better as a more substantiated and context based book. References to other works are absent and would help enormously. However, the same criticisms fall short of destroying the books credibility. This is because the enrichment advocated is fundamentally personal. One cannot therefore present an exact guide to health for it would nearly always be irrelevant. With this in mind, Moore has clearly produced an excellent and special book. It is like a flawed diamond that, however, reflects a rare hue.
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on 29 August 2001
Moore diagnoses "loss of soul" as the root of many of our modern troubles. He does not define soul but tells us that it has to do with qualities such as heart, relatedness, depth, feeling and imagination. His approach makes sense; he advises us to respect those aspects of ourselves that we often reject, seeing value and necessity in shadow qualities such as narcissism and depression. I first encountered this book as a lost soul and was devastated by the accuracy with which the book confronted me with this. Having read it several times and followed some of the suggested further reading I feel that this book has been misunderstood by some of the more critical reviewers. It does not suggest living witout morality but acknowledges that we can use morality as a defence against the soul. The authors knowlegde of the the world`s spiritual traditions is impressive, but he does not advocate spirituality as an escape from the complexities of life, but through them. There are no easy solutions here, but you will find a refreshing perspective and rare consolation.
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VINE VOICEon 22 December 2005
It is the nature of people to try and pigeonhole this writing in some category or another. Several times though the book there is a warning against this. I my self see him as a hybrid of Jung and Catechism.
However I find this a revolutionary work that allows one to see the world in a new or ancient light. We have an opportunity to require or gain a perspective, a reality, a dimension that Thomas Moore calls soul. If nothing else reading the introduction will make this clear. I do not want to paraphrase Moore's works.
The book is well written and the layout is perfect to take you from ground zero of the process of Care of The Soul to a whole new life. However for me I felt a little like reading Dave Berry where he takes the normal and mundane and expands it beyond logic. You wonder how you got there.
He gets into interpreting dreams but not the standard stuff in other dream books. And shows how to relate tem to the topic of Care of The Soul. Somehow he bypasses a subject that I would be interested in. I use dreams to be more creative in work. Usually I can come up with unique solutions or insights in the middle of the night.
By the time you reach chapter eleven "Wedding Spirituality and Soul" you can see he is more into Jung than S. Freud. Also items that start to look like hypnosis byproducts ate creeping into the conversation.
Towards the end of the book he gets more concrete and wraps up lose ends.
Bottom line is you can not just read the book; you must live it to, to know it. And then again there is no guarantee.
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on 18 September 2005
Of the many books that I have read, I would say that this is the most important.
Some people say that health is the most important thing in life. It's not. Soul is.
I have read this book many times and yet I always find something to inspire me.
Moore basically makes the point that loss of soul or narcissism can affect us and cut us off from feeling and imagination.
He offers many ideas for care of the soul such as honoring symptoms, working with dreams and reading good books.
I reccommend this book to anyone who is curious about themselves.
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on 25 September 2013
i've found this book to be an excellent read that challenges my existing beliefs about so much. well written & very helpful for someone who doesn't really enjoy reading 'self help'- it draws from Greek mythology and folk stories which i love.
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on 5 August 2013
A good insightful book overall, acquainted me with some psychological aspects of behaviour like narcicissm and other terms which I had heard before, but didn't know what they meant.
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on 4 February 2014
When the moment is right one can't read enough of this sort of book. When the moment is no longer present, this type of book is a repetative read.
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on 20 May 2013
a lovely read. a book that will be kept forever on my shelf. can be read numerous times and something new learned each time.
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on 4 January 2016
Thomas Moore write from an incredibly informed, varied perspective and with such humanity. His work is deeply in touch with the reality of being human and experiencing a range of emotions. Society projects a pressure for everything to be 'amazing' and Moore explores the potential of gifts in the darker nights and suggests that these aren't 'bad' times to be avoided but felt and learnt from.
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on 14 July 2013
The tenets of this book are perfectly obvious. Of course nice walks, good food and pleasant decor can lift the spirits! So too can fun and humour, which were not included. The author had a habit of couching everything in Latin or Greek phrases, which I found very pretentious and irritating.
At times he mentioned his patients in therapy, and I would have liked to know more about how he treated them and what the outcomes were.
Overall I found the narrative superficial in substance and pompous in tone. What's the Latin for that?
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