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on 12 January 2004
This a wonderful book, featuring Lady Morgan Bedwyn. She is singled out by Lord Rosthorn in Brussels because he wants revenge on her brother, the Duke of Bewcastle, then they are caught up in the aftermath of Waterloo together (beautifully described). Alleyne Bedwyn is missing presumed dead (although we are given a hint as to what happens to him, so we know he will come back for the next 'Slightly' book due out soon, but back in England we get to see the Bedwyns trying to come to terms with his death as well as catching a glimpse into Bewcastle's past and the antipathy between him and Rosthorn. Of course it all unravels towards a happy ending, but there are some interesting twists.
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on 2 March 2007
Mary Balogh's "Slightly" series have been variable in quality. I was rather disappointed with "Slightly Married" (Aidan), "Slightly Wicked" (Rannulf) and "Slightly Sinful" (Alleyne) but thought that "Slightly Scandalous" (Freyja) and "Slightly Dangerous" (Wulfric) were excellent. "Slightly Tempted" is the last of the Bedwyn series that I have read, although chronologically it's book 4 of the 6 (although "Sinful", Alleyne's story, occurs at the same time), and it was a really good read.

"Slightly Tempted" is the story of the youngest of the Bedwyns, daughter Morgan, who is 18 and in her first season. The events take place around the battle of Waterloo and Morgan is in Brussels with her brother Alleyne and a family who are looking after her. She meets Gervase Ashford, Earl of Rosthorne, at a ball and enjoys her conversation with him. Rosthorne's personality seems rather similar to that of Joshua, Marquess of Hallmere in "Slightly Scandalous" - he's fun, witty, a rake (of course!) and yet there are deeper things going on in his character. He was banished from England 9 years before after apparently ravishing a lady neighbour who was about to be betrothed to Wulfric, Duke of Bewcastle and Morgan's brother. Rosthorne feels distinctly uncharitable towards Wulfric and when he discovers Wulfric's sister is in Brussels he resolves to get some revenge on her brother by leading her into some indiscretions.

Of course his plan goes a little awry when he discovers there is more to Morgan than just being a lightweight debutante - they spend a lot of time together and his motives in spending time with her change significantly. However, when returning to England and the talk of society Morgan discovers his past and believes that all his behaviour was designed to hurt her brother Wulfric. How can Rosthorne prove his love is genuine, that he isn't guilty of the horrible event nine years before, and how can her persuade Morgan to marry him when she doesn't trust him?

This book has more historical detail than a lot of Mary Balogh's other works - the setting of the Battle of Waterloo (also shared with "Slightly Sinful") is very well described. I loved the way in which Morgan mucked in with people to help treat the injured and wounded and the descriptions of the final ball before the war were very good. There are also, for those who've read "Slightly Sinful", several events that coincide and the ending of this book introduces a significant event which we read about fully in "Slightly Sinful".

The main character of Morgan is interesting - she's young, brash, doesn't seem to mind too much about public opinion and sometimes seems rather uncaring about her chaperones and companions. On the other hand she's shown as truly caring for the injured after Waterloo and she works to effect forgiveness between Rosthorne and those who wronged him nine years ago. Rosthorne himself is well written although, as I mentioned above, he seems rather like Joshua Moore, Marquess of Hallmere, who also seemed rather like Kit Butler in "A Summer To Remember". Is Mary Balogh running out of types of male character?

The pacing in this book is really good, as are the descriptions of locations in both Brussels and Kent. The Bedwyn family are all over this book of course, and almost every reference to Wulfric seems to involve his quizzing glass (annoying) but in this book I didn't mind the Bedwyn references, although in some others they have been too much.

If you enjoyed the other "Slightly" books then you'll enjoy this one as it's one of the better ones.
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on 13 August 2011
sadly the last of the bedwyn family saga and up to the high standard of all the others, this is the youngest of the family, morgan, and her story meeting the earl of rosthorn in brussels shortly before the battle of waterloo. he is a man her eldest brother, the duke, despising as a dishonest rake [unfairly]. the description of the battle and the emotions it has on the soldiers participating is very well done and she has done her research well. once they all return to england the books take on a lighter tone and the romance between morgan and gervase is rather lovely. the peripheral characters in the book are very amusing too. this is mary balogh at her best when she develops and takes us through the growing love between two people who under normal circumstances most likely would not have been allowed to meet. also there is the fun with catching up on the rest of the bedwyn family who appear in the pages of the book.
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on 28 March 2013
Review taken from my Blog Post (#61) in December 2010:

A 3.5 Star read when I originally read it at the local library, but decided that it was probably worth an upgrade to a 4.

Whilst I enjoyed it, and it was good to get Morgan's side of the whole Bedwyn Series, it was a little slow going at the beginning, with a gentle curve towards a satisfactory ending. Probably best to read this before you read Slightly Sinful (Blog Post #60) ..... I suspect it might have been better that way around!
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on 5 February 2007
Mary Balogh's "Slightly" series have been variable in quality. I was rather disappointed with "Slightly Married" (Aidan), "Slightly Wicked" (Rannulf) and "Slightly Sinful" (Alleyne) but thought that "Slightly Scandalous" (Freyja) and "Slightly Dangerous" (Wulfric) were excellent. "Slightly Tempted" is the last of the Bedwyn series that I have read, although chronologically it's book 4 of the 6 (although "Sinful", Alleyne's story, occurs at the same time), and it was a really good read.

"Slightly Tempted" is the story of the youngest of the Bedwyns, daughter Morgan, who is 18 and in her first season. The events take place around the battle of Waterloo and Morgan is in Brussels with her brother Alleyne and a family who are looking after her. She meets Gervase Ashford, Earl of Rosthorne, at a ball and enjoys her conversation with him. Rosthorne's personality seems rather similar to that of Joshua, Marquess of Hallmere in "Slightly Scandalous" - he's fun, witty, a rake (of course!) and yet there are deeper things going on in his character. He was banished from England 9 years before after apparently ravishing a lady neighbour who was about to be betrothed to Wulfric, Duke of Bewcastle and Morgan's brother. Rosthorne feels distinctly uncharitable towards Wulfric and when he discovers Wulfric's sister is in Brussels he resolves to get some revenge on her brother by leading her into some indiscretions.

Of course his plan goes a little awry when he discovers there is more to Morgan than just being a lightweight debutante - they spend a lot of time together and his motives in spending time with her change significantly. However, when returning to England and the talk of society Morgan discovers his past and believes that all his behaviour was designed to hurt her brother Wulfric. How can Rosthorne prove his love is genuine, that he isn't guilty of the horrible event nine years before, and how can her persuade Morgan to marry him when she doesn't trust him?

This book has more historical detail than a lot of Mary Balogh's other works - the setting of the Battle of Waterloo (also shared with "Slightly Sinful") is very well described. I loved the way in which Morgan mucked in with people to help treat the injured and wounded and the descriptions of the final ball before the war were very good. There are also, for those who've read "Slightly Sinful", several events that coincide and the ending of this book introduces a significant event which we read about fully in "Slightly Sinful".

The main character of Morgan is interesting - she's young, brash, doesn't seem to mind too much about public opinion and sometimes seems rather uncaring about her chaperones and companions. On the other hand she's shown as truly caring for the injured after Waterloo and she works to effect forgiveness between Rosthorne and those who wronged him nine years ago. Rosthorne himself is well written although, as I mentioned above, he seems rather like Joshua Moore, Marquess of Hallmere, who also seemed rather like Kit Butler in "A Summer To Remember". Is Mary Balogh running out of types of male character?

The pacing in this book is really good, as are the descriptions of locations in both Brussels and Kent. The Bedwyn family are all over this book of course, and almost every reference to Wulfric seems to involve his quizzing glass (annoying) but in this book I didn't mind the Bedwyn references, although in some others they have been too much.

If you enjoyed the other "Slightly" books then you'll enjoy this one as it's one of the better ones.
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on 20 May 2011
I adore Balogh and this story is totally in her style. Morgan is such a wonderful heroine, smart, vivacious and captivating and Gervase embodies the best of what I think encapsulates the delectable rakish gentleman. A really wonderful story filled with love, life and laughter. A must read, especially if you want to understand the Bedwyns.
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on 8 April 2009
Mary Balogh. Brilliant! "Slightly Tempted" was one of my favourites. Lady Morgan Bedwyn at 18 years old thinks she is able to deal with rakes. The Earl of Rosthorn has an unknown agenda 'Vengeance'. Banished for 9 years, restored only when he inherits his title, he has a score to settle and Morgan is an unwitting tool. Meeting in Brussels before the Battle of Waterloo and thence to England the action continues between the couple, bringing in various other interesting characters. I loved it, and will leave you to discover how the problems are resolved Which, of course, they must be as this is a romance.
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on 1 May 2009
This is yet another book in the slightly series that I have had to read from beginning to end in the same day...I love it
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on 19 November 2014
There have been Jane Austen and Georgette Heyer. But Mary Balogh, surpasses them all. Literally and figuratively.
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on 29 September 2013
A friend recommended I read this book. I was not disappointed. I loved it and have recommended it to others.
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