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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars When to quit "the wrong stuff" at "the right time"
It is impossible to ignore what Seth Godin has to say and how he says it. That's remarkable. In this small volume (only 80 pages and about the size of a greeting card), Godin shares some LARGE ideas, one of which is indicated in the title of my review. Here is a cluster of Godinesque observations:

All our successes are the same. All our failures, too.
We...
Published on 25 May 2007 by Robert Morris

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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Not a revelation
Basically is an aspect of your life a dip or a cul-de-sac. Once you have decided, then you know whether to quit or continue. This is the idea which is expanded and repeated throughout the book, nothing more.

I wouldnt recommend this and certainly wouldnt pass it around my work place as the author suggests. For some who are indecisive this may be useful, but if...
Published on 30 Dec. 2011 by Mul


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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars When to quit "the wrong stuff" at "the right time", 25 May 2007
By 
Robert Morris (Dallas, Texas) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
It is impossible to ignore what Seth Godin has to say and how he says it. That's remarkable. In this small volume (only 80 pages and about the size of a greeting card), Godin shares some LARGE ideas, one of which is indicated in the title of my review. Here is a cluster of Godinesque observations:

All our successes are the same. All our failures, too.
We succeed when we do something remarkable.
We fail when we give up too soon.
We succeed when we are the best in the world at what we do.
We fail when we get distracted by tasks we don't have the guts to quick.
Quit the wrong stuff.
Stick with the right stuff.
Have the guts to do one or the other.

In 1963, Peter Drucker made an assertion with which Seth Godin presumably agrees: "There is surely nothing quite so useless as doing with great efficiency what should not be done at all."

Both Drucker and Grodin are diehard pragmatists. My guess (only a guess) is that each learned lessons of greatest value to them from their failures rather than from their successes, that both of them (at least occasionally) felt like giving up and sometimes did, making a bad decision by quitting "the right stuff" or sticking with "the wrong stuff."

I presume to offer an example of what Godin seems to have in mind. All of us begin each day with the best of intentions. Let's say our objective is to produce more and better results in less time. OK, that's a worthy objective. Then let's say, that doesn't happen. Perhaps how we pursue the objective isn't working but we don't quit our method. (Albert Einstein once suggested that insanity is "doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.") Or let's say that our method is the right one but we are impatient with the immediate results, quit on that method, and try another.

Here's the challenge: When encountering what Godin characterizes as "the Dip" (i.e. a temporary setback which creates a "moment of truth"), know the difference(s) between "the right stuff" and "the wrong stuff" and proceed accordingly.

So many decisions in life are gambles (i.e. "knowing when to hold and when to fold") in that they must be made without complete information and thus require a combination of knowledge, judgment, instinct, and faith.

A careful reading of Godin's book will increase the reader's knowledge and improve her or his judgment. He helps his reader to answer questions such as these:

"Is this a Dip, a Cliff, or a Cul-de-Sac?

"If it's a Cul-de-Sac, how can I manage it into a Dip?"

"Is my persistence going to pay off in the long run?"

"When should I quit? I need to know now, not when I'm in the middle of it, and not when part of me is begging to quit."

"If I'm going to quit anyway, will it increase my ability to get through the Dip on something more important?"

Finding correct answers to questions such as these may not sharpen one's instincts (although I suspect they could) but the answers will at least strengthen one's faith in the correctness of the decision, whatever that decision may be, when the next Dip occurs.
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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Keep Going Through the Dip to Become Number One, But Quit If Results Aren't Ever Going to Improve, 10 May 2007
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 127,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
Do you remember starting something new that interested you? Chances are the world seemed a little brighter, a little more inviting, and your smile was a little wider that day.

Now, remember how that same activity seemed after six months had passed. It's likely you weren't having as much fun; progress was hard to accomplish; and frustration was starting to build. That's what a dip feels like.

That sequence is the normal experience and psychology of creating worthwhile results.

But in some cases, you are headed for a dead end where results will never amount to much (if you ever see me play golf, you'll know what I'm talking about). In rarer cases, results just keep going downhill forever (if you've seen me run lately, you'll get the idea).

Many people make mistakes when "the going gets tough."

1. Some will keep going even though future results won't reward the effort (such as those who keep trying to master something for which they have little ability). This behavior is usually the result of bad habits (like always following tradition . . . or existing beliefs) I call "stalls" that harm progress.

2. Others will quit before they break through into improvements that make an enormous difference (going through a dip) and miss the chance to get great benefits from continuing, well-focused effort. The "best in the world" (or "best in your corner of the world") will get a disproportionate share of the benefits from what everyone does. Who is going to pay much attention to the 1,000,001 ranked book reviewer on Amazon? People who behave this way are usually suffering from the procrastination, bureaucracy, ugly duckling or disbelief stalls (see The 2,000 Percent Solution).

In past books by Mr. Godin, I've criticized him for taking an article and stretching it too far into a book. I've also mentioned that he sometimes forgets to explain what to do.

In The Dip, Mr. Godin has broken through his dip and avoided both of those problems. This book is only slightly longer than it needed to be. It has excellent advice on how to tell the difference between future potential and lack of opportunity. The point about disproportionate rewards is also well developed.

Nice going, Mr. Godin!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Not a revelation, 30 Dec. 2011
Basically is an aspect of your life a dip or a cul-de-sac. Once you have decided, then you know whether to quit or continue. This is the idea which is expanded and repeated throughout the book, nothing more.

I wouldnt recommend this and certainly wouldnt pass it around my work place as the author suggests. For some who are indecisive this may be useful, but if you were proactive enough to think about buying the book in the first place, it probably wont teach you anything.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Concise, 2 Jun. 2011
By 
John M. Ford "johnDC" (near DC, MD USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Dip: The extraordinary benefits of knowing when to quit (and when to stick) (Paperback)
"This book is really short. Short books are hard to write, but you made me do it. My readers are excellent correspondents, and this is something I've learned from them along the way: Write less." --Seth Godin

Damn straight. This book is an exercise in brevity. I often recommend that readers preview a key chapter before deciding whether to commit to a book. No need with this one--just take an extra 20 minutes and read the whole thing. Borrow it instead of buying it; the key points will stick with you.

Godin's points are straightforward:

* Comes a time in doing anything when it gets hard and stops being fun.
* If it is something you can be the best at, stick with it through the "dip."
* If it isn't something you can excel at, quit. And excel at something else.
* Learn to recognize such "cul-de-sacs" and avoid even starting such paths.
* Endlessly coping without either excelling or quitting is a trap.
* Systems are designed to exploit "copers" in various ways. Beware.
* There are eight common causes of "dips." Beware some more.

That's pretty much it. There are some good stories about Vince Lumbardi, Butch Cassidy, the space shuttle, and Microsoft. But they build on the main points. There is good advice here. It would be worth your time, even if it were longer.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great for stubborn freelancers wandering in the wilderness, 9 Sept. 2009
By 
T. de Grunwald (London, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Dip: The extraordinary benefits of knowing when to quit (and when to stick) (Paperback)
I'm new to the world of Seth, so don't know how The Dip compares to his other publications, but have already recommended this handy little book to several friends. He's right in that we're - wrongly - taught that quitting is always bad - a shameful thing that only weak people do. As a result, all too often - and for too long - freelancers like me stick with ways of working that just aren't... working! We need to take the stigma out of quitting and realise that there are times when it is the smart thing to do. Is what you're facing a 'blip' - or is your plan flawed in some way that wasn't immediately obvious when you started out? I'm not a businessperson but would recommend this to other freelance writers like me, plus to friends who are photographers, illustrators etc who have - after early success and a buzz around their name - become stuck in a hand-to-mouth existence that stopped being fun - and lucrative! - long ago... Yes, the Dip is a smidge repetitive, but if you're stubborn enough to need to read this book, you're probably the kind of person who needs things drummed into you! By the end, I'd got the message. Since then, I've acted on the advice and feel much clearer on where I'm going now.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The Dip, 7 Jun. 2009
By 
B. Smith (north west england) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Dip: The extraordinary benefits of knowing when to quit (and when to stick) (Paperback)
A bit disappointing. It could have been a quarter of the length. Some interesting points but lost, for me, in too much hype and too much repetition. Would not bother reading it again.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars a bit thin, 26 Sept. 2010
By 
K. Prygodzicz (London, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Dip: The extraordinary benefits of knowing when to quit (and when to stick) (Paperback)
This book is a quick read. The message is quite simple. In many things in life (study, career, sport, relationships, etc.)you will encounter a plateau and period of difficulty. The author calls this period the 'dip'. You must expect this period of difficulty in your undertakings,and plan for it. Many people give up when they experience the dip, but if you are able to persist through it while others fall by the wayside, you will get extraordinary rewards. The author says;
1. Make sure that what you are doing is worth the effort. Do not start undertakings which will turn out to be cul-de-sacs.
2. Never start something if you do not have the resources (time, money etc) to get through the dip. Once you have got through the dip you will be among the best and get extraordinary rewards.
3. Aim to be the best and get extraordinary rewards. Do not start something if you end up being only average (e.g. aim to be the best salesman, do not end up as an average salesman).
4. Do not be afraid to give up some things, so you can concentrate on the those important things where you can get through the dip.
5 Know when to stick with something and when to quit. There is nothing wrong with quitting so you can concentrate on those things when you can get through the dip.

The book is short, easy to read. I think to get the best out of it requires the reader to stop and contemplate and apply what the author is writing in each section, and then re-read the book occasionally.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars There's a reason why "Consultant" begins with "Con", 25 Mar. 2014
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This review is from: The Dip: The extraordinary benefits of knowing when to quit (and when to stick) (Paperback)
Now, there is a point to this book. That knowing when to quit and quitting things that should be quitted is very useful. However, that would take a page and a half. The rest of the eighty odd pages of this book is taken up with examples, some arguable, of people and organisations that benefit from doing this well, but absolutely NOTHING about how to determine when it's right to quit or how to apply the idea.

This might be good as a motivational talk given by those management insultants that do such things, you know ,when you're fired up in the room, go outside and think "that was great" then "but what did he actually say", finally realising you've been had.

One star for sure.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars OK advice but poor explanation, 12 Dec. 2010
This review is from: The Dip: The extraordinary benefits of knowing when to quit (and when to stick) (Paperback)
The notion of the 'plateau' is familiar among educators. After the first excitement and quick feedback on progress when studying a new subject, language, instrument or whatever, the learning curve flattens out as the newbie has to put in the long, superficially unrewarding hours to eventually achieve mastery. This book applies the plateau to business and dramatically renames it the 'dip', the demotivating slow growth and low income stage where initial enthusiasm has worn off. Godwin correctly indentifies this as a crucial stage when entrepreneurs often quit. If you can get through it though, the reward is mastery of your market, the dip having seen off your less resolute competitors. Sound if unspectacular advice. The problem is Godwin fails to explain the characteristics of the dip properly, so when he (again sensibly) tries to nuance the argument by saying 'it is actually OK to quit sometimes', the book simply falls apart in a sea of contradictions and superficial questions. The Dip is itself then something of a conceptual dip, pity Godwin hadn't persevered to give us something really useful.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Being allowed to give up and later succeed, 27 Oct. 2009
By 
Jonathan Kettleborough (Cheshire, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Dip: The extraordinary benefits of knowing when to quit (and when to stick) (Paperback)
Ever wanted to give up? I guess we all have at some point. In his book, Seth talks through why giving up is not such a good idea (or perhaps giving up in the right way).

We've all had tough customers, tough clients and times when we just can't seem to make progress. Seth differentiates between a dip (work through these) and a cul-de-sac (give up and move on). This is a seemingly obvious approach, but how many people do we all know who have just kept trying at something that just isn't working? When did we last say "If that happens one more time I'm leaving this company!" only to have it happen to us time and time again. Seth provides some guidance and strategies.

As with all of Seth's books, this was a very easy (and quick) read and was a very reflective read and one which provides clear indications into how successful people operate and their ability to close down on one project/client/customer and move on to something more rewarding.

Well recommended.
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