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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant and harrowing 'Gladiator' for kids
The best children's novel of 2001, this is the second of a trilogy. The first, The Wind Siger, won the Gold Smarties and was funny and gripping but this is far better. Admirers of Philip Pullman will find the same kind of seriousness... The Hath family, along with their tribe are taken into slavery by the Mastery, a culture similar to Imperial Rome. It creates high art,...
Published on 1 July 2001

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars An imaginative and a gripping read
Slaves of the Mastery was gripping from the very start and had some wonderful magical concepts in it, such as Bowman's communication with the cat. The characters seem better developed and have more depth than in the Wind Singer. However, many of the elements of the story are familiar from fantasy tales that I have read over the years so I would agree with the reviewer...
Published on 7 Oct 2002


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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant and harrowing 'Gladiator' for kids, 1 July 2001
By A Customer
The best children's novel of 2001, this is the second of a trilogy. The first, The Wind Siger, won the Gold Smarties and was funny and gripping but this is far better. Admirers of Philip Pullman will find the same kind of seriousness... The Hath family, along with their tribe are taken into slavery by the Mastery, a culture similar to Imperial Rome. It creates high art, especially music, but through terror thanks the the Master's ability to dominate his subjects' minds. The Hath family fight back to free their people, and learn magical powers to challenge the Master. So many children's classics feature a lone hero, but the great thing about Nicholson's books is that the whole family work together and are loyal to each other. There are marvellous inventions such as the manaxa, a deadly gladiatorial dance, a flying cat, a beautiful princess who falls in love with the wrong person and so on but it's this warmth of feeling that is so affecting. A wonderful, captivating and enthralling tale.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An outstanding book with the scope to make you laugh and cry, 8 Sep 2001
By A Customer
Continuing 5 years on from where 'The Wind Singer' left off, this outstanding book will take your breath away and leave you stunned from the first page, until the the last. Based around the people of Aramanth, and in particular the Hath family, 'Slaves of the Mastery' has the potential to make you laugh or cry. William Nicholson has invented a whole host of characters, who, over the course of the book, will be either remembered from 'The Wind Singer', or introduced to us. This book is one of those stories you will want to read over and over, and each time, will grip your mind with a ferociety which will make you hate to finish it.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A strong and powerful book., 10 May 2001
By A Customer
This book is one of the best books I've ever read. I ordered it from Amazon, and while I was waiting for it to arrive I came to amazon to read a few reveiws and see if Kesteral and Bowman were still the stars, but none said. Well I know now, and I'm not going to say! But I can recommend this book, strong and quick moving, with a plot to rival Northern Lights, this book will undoubtably go far. Just make sure you read the previous book, The wind singer, first. AMAZING!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Unputdownable sequel to one of our favourite ever books., 8 May 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Slaves of the Mastery (Wind on Fire) (Paperback)
My ten-year-old daughter and I discovered "The Wind on Fire" trilogy last year and are addicts. William Nicholson has planned and portrayed a thoroughly believable fantasy world, which has both of us enthralled!
Anyone who read "The Wind Singer" will be acquainted with the Hath family and their special talents; "Slaves of the Mastery" manages to make the reader empathise even more with them and their fellow residents of Aramanth. We were definitely more emotionally involved in this second book than the first (by which I mean, my daughter sobbed her heart out several times, and I have to admit I joined her here and there!).
This book gets off to a slower start than the first, as new characters and intertwining storylines are introduced, but from about half the way in, the tension starts to build to a nail-biting climax. Unputdownable!!!!!! Now excuse us - we're off to buy a copy of "Firesong"!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, really superb book., 20 May 2002
This review is from: Slaves of the Mastery (Wind on Fire) (Paperback)
The Slaves of the Mastery is brilliant. It is even better than The Wind Singer, although that was great. The Hath family are made slaves by the Mastery, together with the rest of the people of Aramanth, all except Kestrel, who is left behind. She meets Sisi, a spoilt princess, who has to marry someone that she doesn't know. Kestrel must try to save her, will she succeed? It has a lot of violence, but beauty as well. The new characters are good too, and even though Sisi is a pathetic creature, and Zohon has his heart set on her, they both change towards the end. The Slaves of the Mastery is one of the best books ever written, and if you haven't read it yet, get a move on, but don't forget to read The Wind Singer first!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Breathtakingly Amazing, 18 Nov 2004
By 
Melissa Heus "Avid Reader - origonal name, huh?" (Ridgefield, CT United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Slaves of the Mastery (Wind on Fire) (Paperback)
I have to say that this book is stunning. I read the first book and thought it was okay, pretty good. But I had always thought that the first book lay on the border line of being one of thoooose books (If you read the first one you probably know what I mean) and I probably wouldn't have read the second book if I hadn't owned the trilogy. But I'm glad I did. This book was absolutley amazing. It is a million times better than the last one and I still thought the last one was good. It starts out as Aramanth being burned and taken into slavery of the Mastery, and Kester and Bowman are seperated. I think one thing that makes this book better than the first is that the characters are much more mature, being 15, and more mature ideas come alive such as killing, and love. And I also love how the characters change, but siprising realalistically. I thought that Mumpo was a stupid character in the last book but I loved him in this book, and I thought that the character of Sisi was amazing. The best part though is the huge ending. It is so prolonged and keeps going it makes gasp. There are so many scences that I just had to hold my breathe for, and so many scenes that I could definately see in a movie. And the end really set up for the next book, and there's one incident, whihc I won't mention, whihc I just thought was brilliant. So I highly suggest reading this book because you will be left with an increadable feeling, and entirely satisfied.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant for young and old alike, 23 April 2002
By A Customer
I would just like to say that my son (11 years old) found the first book, and loved it so much he made me read it. I was hooked from the minute I started it, and could not put it down. Now my dad has read it too, and loved it - so I can safely say that these books will appeal to and captivate all ages equally.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The bes in this trilogy, 5 Mar 2003
This review is from: Slaves of the Mastery (Wind on Fire) (Paperback)
I thoroughly enjoyed this book out of the three in the trilogy. I think that the ideas in it and the seperate roles that the different characters take on help to develop them and gives the reader a very clear idea of each personality.
Slaves Of The Mastery follows the Manth family as they are captured from their city aloung with the other citizens and driven off by the army from the Mastery. The idea of slavery is a very powerful one and it draws all the characters togetehr in this difficult situation.
The way in which this story is written is very powerful and the tragedies and injustices suffered by the captured people are described perfectly. Bowman and Kestrel the heroes in these trilogies - work perfectly together and give such a depth to the story that makes it truly enjoyable.
This book is definately worth the read but it is ESSENTIAL to have read the Windsinger first, though a synopsis of the story so far is provided.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Different in the best possible way, 22 April 2003
By 
Mr. Paul J. Bradshaw (Midlands, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Slaves of the Mastery (Wind on Fire) (Paperback)
The second part of Nicholson's trilogy shares the same excellent storytelling, and a tight plot, but there's almost a more political edge going on here. A story of enslavement - and yet more dystopias - this is a compelling picture of slave society and control. Less (but still a lot) happens, but there is more here to make you think. The characters are maturing, too, and the end of the book sets up a fine finish for the final installment...
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Slaves of the Mastery, 8 Aug 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Slaves of the Mastery (Wind on Fire) (Paperback)
I really enjoyed reading this book, it's now one of my favourites of all time. I would recommend this to anyone over the age of 9.
This is the secon book in the series and I've already read the first one, 'The Wind Singer' which was equally as good. I acn't wait to read firesong.
In this book I think Mumpo is a lot mentally strong and physically and I think towards the end Kestrel has much more respect for him. I'm not going to reveal too much but I would advise you to read this.
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Slaves of the Mastery (Wind on Fire)
Slaves of the Mastery (Wind on Fire) by William Nicholson (Paperback - 22 April 2002)
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