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on 25 January 2008
I feel this is the coaching book I've been waiting for and I suspect many readers will feel the same. It is not for the beginner, but for any experienced coach, coach supervisor or trainer of coaches this is a rich source indeed.

The book is essentially an anthology, but with recurring themes throughout each contribution. Many of the chapters are also presented under a set of uniform headings which makes comparing and contrasting ideas and approaches very easy. There are contributions from many of the better known commentators and a full range of topics from `What is Coaching?' to `Coaching Ethics'

The book is structured in three parts. In Part 1, The Business of Coaching, Frank Bresser and Carol Wilson provide a chapter on exactly what coaching is while Katherine Tulpa and Alex Szabo present chapters on `Coaching within organizations' and `Setting up and running your coaching practice' respectively.

Part 2 is dedicated to coaching models and approaches. This is the central part of the book and includes eight chapters ranging from a detailed examination of the ubiquitous GROW model from its originator Graham Alexander to a look at how coaching can contribute to managing stress by Cary Cooper and Maria Alicia Pena.

The Third part is concerned with professional issues with a chapter on ethics by Allard de Jong and one on coaching supervision from Dr Peter Hawkins.

Each chapter is a well-thought out summary of a given topic from an author with a particular interest. As such different readers will favour different contributions but I would encourage anyone to read all of the book as, in its entirety, it represents a tidy overview of the profession as it stands today.

My particular interests would lead me to highlight the chapter on Transpersonal Coaching by John Whitmore and Hetty Einzig and Philippe Rosinski and Geoffrey Abbott's chapter on intercultural coaching. The transpersonal model offers an accessible way for business coaches, experienced with GROW and so on, to take their clients to the next level and begin to examine more `spiritual' issues. Intercultural coaching offers essential tools for coaches who assist managers in global organisations with a wide mix of regional, national, ethnic and professional cultural groups. I also really enjoyed `Solution focused coaching' by Anthony Grant and `Cognitive behavioural coaching' by Michael Neenan.
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on 6 February 2008
Running an Executive Coaching practice, where I have personally delivered thousands of hours of coaching, I approached this book with a healthy scepticism. Was this a book where as many people as possible submitted their names so that they quickly could claim to be `an author'? (I say this with my opinion informed as author of The Coaching Parent). In fact, and the reader will form his own opinion, I believe that for at least 80% of the work this is not the case and either new, or refreshed material is offered. I have annotated significant amounts of the text and found it an excellent product overall. Highlights - having seen Grant in London, I found his piece on Solution-focused coaching worthwhile. Also it was great to hear the thoughts of Alexander on his Grow model.

David Miskimin
The Directors Coach
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on 23 June 2007
I have found this to be a very helpful and practical guide to my own coaching work. It summarises a range of coaching models in a very readable way and the authors illustate well how you can apply them to your own coaching practice. A number of chapters also consider some of the business and ethical issues executive coaches need to pay attention to if we are to serve our clients well. The book is well laid out and very accessible. It is has become a well thumbed book on my bookshelf!
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on 12 January 2016
Very extreme views on coaching. I was told to read this for a course (client centred learning for driver development) but this has no place in teaching in a safety critical environment. In fact coaching has very limited application in a safety critical environment
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on 11 June 2007
Lots of theory and practical issues are covered - as well as different approaches to coaching. Useful book to use as a reference and overall coaching guide.

Easy to access.
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Hit and miss for me – I wouldn’t recommend it in its entirety, but the following Chapters I found really useful: 5 - Behavioural Coaching, 7 - Cognitive Behavioural Coaching, 12 - Intercultural Coaching and especially 9 – the best information on transpersonal coaching I have read.
Great example questions of each coaching approach. Some fantastic models – e.g. FLOW
Learned so much from the section on Cognitive Behavioural Coaching. Really liked the explanation of the two dimensions of psychological development –crisis of meaning, triggered by life events. Another path is spiritual development – the crisis is one of duality, where the ideals espoused are not translated into reality.
Useful for coaches like me, who want to provide excellent professional standards in all aspect of our work. A dip into book.
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on 24 May 2012
I bought this book as I needed extra readings for my Diploma in Coaching for Performance assignment. It's a good book however I preferred Sir John Whitmore's book ' Coaching for Performance' or Jonathan Passmore's book ' Excellence in Coaching. The industry guide'. What I preferred the most in Carol Wilson's book was the case studies.
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VINE VOICEon 20 August 2011
I got this for my son who is a young rugby league coach in the UK. It's a comprehensive and well presented book and builds on a basic understanding of a caoch and coaching. Nicely structured with an easy format to follow.
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on 11 June 2007
I liked this book a lot because it covers a lot of ground and added - chapter by chapter - to my knowledge of coaching approaches and techniques. It also covers the crucial area of coaching supervision and - through Jonathan Passmore's own integrated coaching model - gives a new angle to what experienced coaches are doing. Recommended for those new to coaching to get a better grasp of the many different facets and also for experienced coaches because of the supervision angle and the new approach.
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on 29 September 2015
This is not a good book. I think everyone else who has reviewed it knows nothing about Coaching. There is so much NLP in there without accreditation, and the models are no different, that it demonstrates yet again a rehash of books and papers that have been available since 1980. And five pages on "Ethics"... anyone with higher complexity thinking knows there's no such thing. If you want an industry standard, that's different, but morality and ethics are massively subjective. Just look at what is different yet acceptable in the various religions.
Anyway, if you want to know more about coaching, then don't read this. It's not the industry guide. It doesn't even mention social-emotional or cognitive complexity. The level of complexity at which one thinks influences your thinking and behaviour, and if you are a lower level thinker than your client, you can't help them. There is no mention of this. Basically, wait for my book to come out.
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