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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A refreshing change
This is an excellent and refreshing departure from the standard public relations texts. Griffin points out that despite years of reputation management efforts, business is still viewed with suspicion. He argues that this is the case because business engages with detractors in the wrong way and should move the debate back on to their own terms. For example, Griffin uses...
Published on 18 Dec 2007 by R. Thomas

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2.0 out of 5 stars Not convinced...
This book is very much like the classic, easÓly written business book: the author has some key ideas and then scouts for "case studies" or surveys which may bear them out. The drawback of this approach is that there is no guarantee that the proposed approach is the best one.
Furthermore, the advice given by the author is not always very clear or comprehensive.
I...
Published on 19 Oct 2011 by Chris Peeters


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Clearly written book on reputation and issues management, 30 July 2008
By 
Rolf Dobelli "getAbstract" (Switzerland) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
A person's reputation is his or her most valuable asset. This is also true of corporations. As author Andrew Griffin explains, a corporation's reputation is the result of how it manages social responsibility, crises and issues. Griffin notes that more corporations now acknowledge the importance of reputation, but few turn that awareness into anything tangible. Yet, unfortunately, when a firm's reputation goes bad, it is nearly impossible to fix. By defining the key terms involved in reputation management and providing specific examples, Griffin makes his points clearly. He delves into issues management and the benefits of being a good corporate citizen. getAbstract recommends this book to business communication professionals and other executives who want to learn how to shape the way the public regards their corporations.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A refreshing change, 18 Dec 2007
By 
R. Thomas (Birmingham) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This is an excellent and refreshing departure from the standard public relations texts. Griffin points out that despite years of reputation management efforts, business is still viewed with suspicion. He argues that this is the case because business engages with detractors in the wrong way and should move the debate back on to their own terms. For example, Griffin uses the example of obesity, where food manufacturers are increasingly blamed as the main cause despite having made huge efforts to make their products healthier. Had food companies been more bullish, he says, their reputations would not be as damaged as they are now.

Griffin's writing style makes it easy to follow his argument through how to deal with issues, crises and most controversially, Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). The book is peppered with recent and interesting case studies to illustrate his points. As a PR practitioner, this is a very welcome view in a world of reputation management that advises appeasement and gets little reputation return.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Not convinced..., 19 Oct 2011
This review is from: New Strategies for Reputation Management: Gaining Control of Issues, Crises & Corporate Social Responsibility (Paperback)
This book is very much like the classic, easÓly written business book: the author has some key ideas and then scouts for "case studies" or surveys which may bear them out. The drawback of this approach is that there is no guarantee that the proposed approach is the best one.
Furthermore, the advice given by the author is not always very clear or comprehensive.
I much prefer business books which are based on a more scientific approach: study a field without prejudice, make statistics, discuss what it may mean.
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