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128 of 129 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Recommended - but not for everyone
I bought this the other day as I realised, like the author states in her intro, that I am too attached to recipe books. I was hoping that this would inspire me to try new combinations and start a bit more experimentation. And it has. However, before buying its really important to know what this book is and more importantly what it is not.

What this book is...
Published on 1 Jun 2011 by Syriat

versus
17 of 19 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Useful, but ridiculously over-hyped by people who should know better
It's taken me 18 months to review this book. Largely because the only illustration - the flavour wheel - completely baffled me initially and I couldn't be bothered to work it out. I'm a scientist and firmly believe that illustrations are either an invaluable blessing or a pointless curse - too often the latter, particularly in cookbooks. The main value of a good...
Published 19 months ago by Thomas Holt


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128 of 129 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Recommended - but not for everyone, 1 Jun 2011
By 
Syriat - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
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This review is from: The Flavour Thesaurus (Hardcover)
I bought this the other day as I realised, like the author states in her intro, that I am too attached to recipe books. I was hoping that this would inspire me to try new combinations and start a bit more experimentation. And it has. However, before buying its really important to know what this book is and more importantly what it is not.

What this book is not
- a book with detailed recipes (it doesn't really have any recipes at all)
- a book with illustrations of food (there are no illustrations at all of food)
- a traditional cookery book (no measurements, no oven settings, no real cookery guide)

What this book is
- a jumping off point where you identify flavours with a brief guide to examples
- a well written explanation of how flavour combinations work
- a way for budding chefs to try new flavours with confidence

Not all the combinations are to my liking. And you won't be using this as a cooking bible. However, its very readable and as a resource for a budding chef it really takes some beating. It allows you to be creative rather than follow a recipe to the letter. Which is exactly what I wanted from this book. If, however, you are expecting recipes then avoid.
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628 of 645 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Compulsive reading for all foodies, and the perfect present for keen cooks, 25 Jun 2010
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This review is from: The Flavour Thesaurus (Hardcover)
This book has had stunning reviews in the national newspapers, and I decided to buy it as a present for my husband, the chef in our household. On the tube home, I had a quick flick through it out of curiosity...and I haven't been able to part with it since.

The concept of `The Flavour Thesaurus' is utterly, utterly genius. Segnit has taken 99 basic flavours (mint, coriander, basil, strawberry etc) and researched 980 pairings of them. The result is part recipe-book, part food memoir, part flavour compendium. (The English Language geek in me feels compelled to point out that `thesaurus' is a misnomer - even similar flavours are NOT synonyms, jeez, though the book retains Roget's format).

Some of these pairings are familiar, such as Bacon & Egg, whilst others (Avocado & Mango, anyone?) are not. Now and then, Segnit provides a recipe; many of these sound incredible, and despite being the most amateur of cooks, I reckon even I could manage many of them. Under Melon & Rose, for example, she merely tells you to drown a cantaloupe melon in rosewater syrup, so that it tastes like "a fruity take on gulab jamun". Can you even read that sentence without wanting to dash to the supermarket for the ingredients?

Segnit also peppers the book with restaurant and dish recommendations - not in an insufferable shiny London lifestyle way, but in an enthusiastic, unpretentious, eating-out-with-your-mates "you really have to try this" way. If only she had supplied phone numbers so we could immediately make reservations.

The real revelation, though, is Segnit's language. It is, quite simply, superb. Modern cookery writing seems to fall into three distinct camps: venomous snob, obsessed with tablecloths and ambience rather than the food itself; faux-geezer dahn the faux-pub; and flirty girl breathlessly enthusing over cake. With `The Flavour Thesaurus', Segnit may well have ended the careers of many of these over-hyped morons.

For a start, her prose is endlessly entertaining. Breezy erudition sits alongside hilarious similes. She is a whizz with description: when she tells you that cloves on their own taste the same as sucking on a rusty nail, you half suspect she conducted a comparative taste test just to be sure. She incorporates references so wide-ranging that both Sybil Kapoor and Velma from Scooby Doo rate a mention. Then there are her unmissable riffs: p 148 instructs us on that "essentially unitary quantity, fishandchips", and insists they must be served in "newsless newspaper" (never polystyrene boxes) and always eaten at a bus stop or "on the wall outside the petrol station". Read about Instinctos and you will be snorting with laughter (and visiting Pizza Hut at the first excuse). I have now read `The Flavour Thesaurus' from cover to cover, and still I have not finished.

I must temper my enthusiasm with a few tiny criticisms just to prove this is a genuine review. At nigh on £20 full price, it's expensive for a book without illustrations or photographs (though note Amazon has since discounted it). It assumes a certain level of prior culinary knowledge, which was sometimes frustrating to a novice like me, though it won't bother those with lots of cookbooks and greater competence in the kitchen. The integration of the recipes into the text - Elizabeth David and Simon Hopkinson style - can be irksome until you've got busy with post-it notes. The index needs further sub-division: `crab', for example, offers 11 entries in the index, but the recipe for crab cakes is easily missed under Butternut Squash & Bacon.

But these are such minor complaints given the enormous appeal of this book. My husband hovers over it constantly, anxious for his promised present. My brother and my best friend have already asked to borrow it. `The Flavour Thesaurus' is truly a classic in the making, and no foodie's bookshelf is going to be complete without it.

EDITED TO ADD, the husband (Latin geek) points out that 'thesaurus' means treasury. Well, whatever language you're using, this book is ACE.

UPDATE - JANUARY 2011 Recently, the aforementioned husband, brother and I went to a "book dinner" organised by a local restaurant with recipes inspired by 'The Flavour Thesaurus', at which the author read from her book. Niki Segnit was lovely and exactly as she comes across in the text - funny, clever, and passionate about food in a very down-to-earth way. There was much discussion and disagreement about which flavour combinations worked, but most options on the menu were utterly delicious. If you get the chance to do this, I highly recommend the experience.

UPDATE - FEBRUARY 2011 In response to comments below, my husband and I were both wrong - 'thesaurus' is Greek! Also, a fellow customer reviewer has expressed scepticism about the number of positive votes I've had for this review. I don't know why I've had so many votes (though I'm very grateful for the ones I've received), but I haven't been voting for myself, and I don't have 200 friends to vote on my behalf. In response to his/her insinuations, I also want to make clear I'm not related to this or any other author, nor paid by anyone - including Amazon - to submit reviews (more's the pity). Please also click on the link which leads to my other reviews so you can see that I regularly leave critical reviews as well as "effusive" ones. Of course other readers may disagree with my opinion of this book; but it has been a bestseller, and the author now writes for The Times, so I'm definitely not her only fan. As always, your mileage may vary.
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58 of 62 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A delicious read..., 25 Jun 2010
This review is from: The Flavour Thesaurus (Hardcover)
The best cookbooks become my preferred bedtime reading, piling up next to the bed. The Flavour Thesaurus is top of the pile and it's gone one better - it's jumped the queue ahead of Steig Larsson as my preferred Tube journey read. The Flavour Thesaurus is anecdotally wittier than Nigel Slater's 'Toast' and more use than `LaRousse' (which rarely makes it off my kitchen shelf). Niki Segnit's observations on flavours, their combinations and cooking are as delicious as her recipes. Her genuine love of food makes this book deliciously moorish; each bite-sized entry makes me want for more. Like Ferrero Rocher, one just isn't enough. There are very few cookbooks that are researched and written as brilliantly as this that need not rely on high quality photograpy to tempt the senses. This will make you laugh and get the gastric juices flowing. The Flavour Thesaurus actually makes me throw on my apron and get messy in the kitchen whilst indulging in a glass of champagne and a Marlboro. I will be giving this book to every truly good cook I know. They won't be disappointed.
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27 of 29 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Don't buy one copy......buy 3, 9 Aug 2010
This review is from: The Flavour Thesaurus (Hardcover)
I bought this book as soon as it came out partly because of some outstanding reviews, but mainly because I couldn't believe that no one has tackled why certain flavours go together before. So obvious.....doh!

I showed my new purchase to a foodie friend of mine over dinner. He salivated over it to the detriment of the meal we were eating. The conversation wasn't so hot either. To make a point, I left it with him. And then I left him. One copy down.

I showed my next copy to my sister in law and it hasn't been seen since. Two copies down.

My third and final copy hasn't left my handbag. What a joy to have something like this to dip into. Niki Segnit has come up with perhaps the most innovative approach to food writing since Harold McGee's On Food and Cooking. But where as Harold's opus demands scholarly concentration, The Flavour Thesaurus, is full of humour and life. This is what she has to say on the combination of celery and shellfish:

"Waking from a coma in season 6 of The Sopranos, the first thing Tony asks for is a lobster roll from the Pearl Oyster Bar in the West Village. If you've ever wondered why mobsters are fat, you might like to note that these include melted butter AND mayonnaise. Mix lobster meat, a little finely chopped celery, a squeeze of lemon and seasoning, and leave in the fridge while you open out hot dog buns like books and brown the insides in a pan of melted butter. Stuff the lobster mix into the bun. Eat lying back on a sun lounger, thinking of New England."

So although the basic premise is the matching of pairs of flavours, there is just so, so much more. Food history, recipes, delicious morsels from other great food writers and cultural references from Chekov to the Rolling Stones, make this a life affirming treasury for the confirmed foodie or anyone who has a passing interest in why we eat what we do. Segnit has a charming, intimate style - you just know she'd be a brilliant dinner companion - she manages to combine her hard won research with a sparklingly light anecdote or knowing opinion.

Utterly terrific. Just remember to buy more than one copy.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing, 2 Jan 2011
By 
S. Hackner "stacy" (Chicago, IL) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Flavour Thesaurus (Hardcover)
I recently brought this book to a local cheese shop and was reading it in line. One of the assistants looked over and said, "Oh, I see you brought the Bible." Funny - that's what I've been calling it as well!

I originally bought this book for my boyfriend, but read about 10 pages and decided I needed to keep it. I have since bought copies for many friends and plan on buying it for more.

The word that best describes this book is "delicious". I had to stop reading it in bed because it just made me hungry. It describes every flavor combination humorously, effectively, and delightfully. The quip for potatoes and lamb is that they "should get a room". The chapter on saffron made me drool. This book is well-organized and easy to flip through to read certain chapters, but also works well cover-to-cover. Speaking of which, it has the most delicious cover art I've ever seen. An absolutely beautiful book.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars bringing order to the chaos that is flavour!, 31 Oct 2010
By 
D. Zoll - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Flavour Thesaurus (Hardcover)
it's a beautiful looking book (i'm guilty of judging books by their covers). I've dipped into it a number of times in the past couple of months of owning Niki Segnit's thesaurus. It's by no means an exhaustive, objective catalogue of flavours but it has proved to be an interesting kitchen companion. Most recently i was looking for new marriages to the very marriageable basil for a pesto producing friend, the book fell a bit short but the classification wheel which shows the different categories of flavours and how they merge into one another was worth the price of the book alone!

It will make a fantastic gift (I'm hoping) for the cooks in our lives that don't bother with recipes.

the reason i didn't give it five stars as (like another reviewer pointed out) the book has been glued at the spine and not stitched and even though the puce page edges are delightful the lack of proper binding gives the book a bit of a gimmicky feel. I guess this is not necessarily a drawback when giving gifts!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not for recipe seekers, 24 Oct 2010
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This review is from: The Flavour Thesaurus (Hardcover)
Excellent book, well researched, wittily written and full of ideas to experiment with. Be warned though not a book for those who like to follow recipes.
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31 of 34 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A must have book. Full of culinary inspiration. And a brilliant read., 24 Jun 2010
This review is from: The Flavour Thesaurus (Hardcover)
Anyone who has the slightest interest in eating, let alone cooking, should own this book. I loved it.
It's an unbelievably well researched, thorough exploration of how flavours combine, that opens up all sorts of surprising possibilities for anyone who's ever wondered what to do with the forlorn stuff that lurks in their fridge... or with those slightly intimidating ingredients that you've never quite had the courage to tackle.
But it's also much more than that. Although, as a thesaurus, it follows a Roget like structure, that's where the comparison ends. Far from just being a reference book, The Flavour Thesaurus is a brilliant read - something to dip in and out of for sheer enjoyment, as well as for culinary inspiration. Niki Segnit is a fantastic writer. She seems to have a knack for conjouring up the exact character of the flavours she discusses. She uses truly original, often laugh-out-loud descriptions that are so much better observed and so much more evocative than the usual run-of-the-mill stuff that food writers tend to churn out.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Truly original in form, content and writing style, 8 April 2011
By 
The Good Soup (Brisbane, Australia) - See all my reviews
Niki Segnit has achieved something truly original with this book. First, she creates a flavour continuum; 99 flavours by which to organise her book. These 99 flavours she further classifies into groupings such as 'Roasted', 'Mustardy', 'Woodland', 'Bramble and Hedge' and 'Earthy'. Then, she goes through each of these groupings, flavour by flavour. Using literary, film and TV references, anecdotes, food science, cooking lore and recipes, she describes each flavours pairing with others, from the exquisite to the overrated.

Now, neither the flavours Niki chooses for her continuum nor their pairngs are comprehensive, but this book is the beginning of something quite marvelous, as well as something that could very easily be extended upon. Like Niki says, if she had dealt with flavours in combinations of threes rather than twos, this would have increased the number of entries in the thesaurus to 156,849 rather than the mere 4,851 she had to contend with. Even with its limitations, this book covers a lot of flavour ground.

One of the things I love most about this book is Niki's writing. She's an incredible conjurer of flavour imagery through her original use of analogy. Here's an example for your sensual pleasure:

"Chocolate and Cardamom: Like a puppeteer's black velvet curtain, dark chocolate is the perfect smooth background for cardamom to show off its colours. Use the cardamom in sufficient quantities and you can pick out its enigmatic citrus, eucalyptus and warm, woody-floral qualities" (p.14)

And if you need even more convincing, Niki will often include a recipe that shows off the pairing. I love how she does this in the style of Jane Grigson and Elizabeth David (the classics no less): no photos, no lists, only the bare instructions. This book is designed for cooks who love to read, not food pornographers.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Inspiring, 15 Sep 2010
This review is from: The Flavour Thesaurus (Hardcover)
This book has been an instant hit in our household. So much so that we have now purchased eight copies for family and friends as we can't stop giving our own copy away. Every home that is interested in food and cooking should have this book.
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The Flavour Thesaurus
The Flavour Thesaurus by Niki Segnit (Hardcover - 21 Jun 2010)
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