Customer Reviews


1,355 Reviews
5 star:
 (933)
4 star:
 (240)
3 star:
 (118)
2 star:
 (37)
1 star:
 (27)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


35 of 36 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A fantastically thrilling book
I am 8 years old. I really love this thrilling book. Anyone aged eight and a half to thirty years who likes adventures should read it. It is full of magic and excitement. If you are worried about it being too scary, then don't - it has never given me nightmares. As soon as I got this book I could not wait to get started. I hope you enjoy it too.
Published on 5 Dec. 2010

versus
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars the weakest but still stronger than the opposition
I was disappointed at a first reading of Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince. Mainly because not a lot seemed to happen: the magical number of seven books had to be filled, but you got the feeling that this one had little raison d'etre. At the end of Phoenix everything seemed to be in place for a final showdown between Harry and Voldemort, but pretexts are found for...
Published on 3 Feb. 2009 by Caroline Galwey


Most Helpful First | Newest First

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars love this book, 2 Jun. 2010
The crown jewel of the Harry Potter series, "Half-Blood Prince" is one of the finest novels I've read in my lifetime. Having allowed us to watch Harry evolve and mature for so many years, Rowling finally lifts the veil, so to speak, humanizing the larger than life characters of not just Dumbledore and Snape, but significantly and achingly, Tom Riddle. This is love letter to one of the hardest things we all experience: the moment that your idols become your peers, your parents become your friends, and your superiors your equals, when you realize we're all in this together and that it is nobody's job to shelter you, and when, finally, you realize that people are absolutely human.
Rowling's affection for her characters and her sympathy for even the most vile of her creations (the Malfoys and Voldemort himself) are at the heart of Harry Potter's lasting beauty and insight. Here, she explores her three most fascinating creations, and one wishes the story would never end. But it does, and when it does, Harry is faced with the same challenge that Rowling subjects her readers to: how much faith do you really have in what you've been told, and do you believe, at the end of the day, that good really does win out?

A timeles classic. One of my favorites, ever
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Harry comes of age..., 24 July 2005
By A Customer
Well Harry has finally grown up and I'm not sure how I feel about it. Long gone are the innocent pranks and japes around Hogwarts, this is serious... I loved this book, immensely. I can't pretend I have payed much attention to the theories/leaks pertaining to the book. When I read this book I had only entertained my own theories. I was surprised by some of the relevations and less so by others.
Whether you consider yourself a HUGE Potter fan, or just enjoy reading them, this book is huge in its implications. Of course, there is a definite formula to the book - that is half the appeal - but the end literally 'removes the rug' from under one's feet. I am not sure which is sadder, the death of a much-loved and influential character or the loss of Harry's innocence... (Which you may argue, he lost ages ago, but this book finally pushes him into adulthood)
Harry and his friends have come a very long way since the Philosopher's stone, you will cry and laugh during this penultimate episode. Questions will be answered, yet you will end the book with many more...
Not at all dissapointing. Rowling delivers exactly what she promised. Harry is now a young man and I can't wait to take the final journey with him.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A return to form, 22 July 2005
Like a lot of other readers, I would guess, I was disappointed with Order of the Pheonix, and wondered if HBP would be better- I can safely say that it is. It is darker in tone than OOTP, which is no bad thing bearing in mind Harry is older and becoming more aware of the magnitude of Voldemort's evil.The ongoing character development of much loved characters, particularly the comedy brilliance of Ron and Hermione's, and their completely mutual feelings for each other combined with not knowing how to say it really was great. As for Harry's romance, I was quite surprised but think that the female character has come into her own in the last few books and is almost as likeable as Hermione, and the last scene between the two was quite poignant. As for the death and the major plot twist- it worked, although I wonder whether Rowling isn't still going to spring a reversal on us in the last book somehow as regards to the "killer" and his true allegiances. Only bad thing about this book is that it might be a long wait to the next one- although, if the quality and enjoyment of reading that last installment- I- was as high as this one was -I couldn't put it down- I don't mind!
Was this review helpful to you?
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars another steller work, 27 Jan. 2006
By 
Keril (Everett, WA) - See all my reviews
A series that can stimulate the imagination of children and encourage them to read is thing of beauty. Not only does this book appeal to the younger set, but us older guys too. I've been reading fantasy now for twenty years and this series has held my attention throughout.
Another story I'd reccomend is a new guy, Brian S. Pratt. In his debut novel he creates a world where a young man is pulled from this one and deposited without any idea why or what he's to do. Full of action, magic and war, James(the hero) sets out in search of answers.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Shocking and amazing, JKR does it again!!! - Spoiler free!!, 18 July 2005
I have only been a fan of Harry Potter since December 2004 and read books one to five in a few days. Like many others I was eagerly anticipating the arrival of Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince and could not sleep as the release date approached. I was not disappointed.
I enjoyed the sixth installment of the Harry Potter books and I suspect readers will by shocked, amazed and disppointed about the content of this book. Like many others, I'm sure you will want to throw your book across the room over certain events and open your mouth wide in learning the parentage of a certain character.
Harry has certainly matured in the sixth book and the relationships between the central characters constantly change and of course there is Quidditch.
I can say for sure that the US and UK covers (Children's, Adult and Deluxe) will make sense now afetr you have read the book.
Not all of you will like it, but hey, you can't please everyone.
Identity of the Half-Blood Prince? - Shocked me.
Keep an open mind, don't speed read and read between the lines.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A bit of a slow start builds to a ferocious climax, 19 July 2005
By 
Aidan J. McQuade (Ireland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Like the last book, The order of the phoneix, a central part of this one is concerned with addressing plot exposition for the overall story arc of Harry's duel with Voldemort. Consequently it is perhaps not as self-contained a novel as, say, The Prisoner of Azkhaban, and is a little slow to get going.
Having said that it once it gets going it is not only terrifically exciting and entertaining but touches upon some important issues: the nature of war, how fear can lead even the well intentioned to act unjustly, loss, and perhaps the dominant theme in the series, how our choices define us as human beings. Like Joss Wheldon's work, JK Rowling understands that putting believable and likeable characters in fantastical situations heightens the universiality and impact of what it is like to face the mundane and terrifying dilemmas that life brings to us all.
Very sad, very exciting, some lovely moments of humour and a fine evocation of the sense of loss that becoming an adult brings.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Welcome return to form, 19 July 2005
After the disappointment of the Order of the Phoenix, the Half-Blood Prince is a welcome return to form by Rowling. The whole book is much tighter, with very much less aimless "stuff-happening-just-for-the-sake-of-it". The story is well paced, and the darker tone of previous books is even stronger. Of course, there is no getting away from the usual touchstones of Harry's life - summer holidays at the Dursleys, going to the Weasleys', Diagon Ally, missing the sorting, Quiddich etc, etc.
Of course, for those who have found themselves helplessly immersed in the Potter-verse, waiting on tenterhooks for each new instalment, any review is pointless - we're going to buy it anyway. But it's nice that it looks like we're building for an excellent finale, rather than drifting towards a damp squib ending.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Better a few years on, 16 July 2009
Having been a huge Harry Potter fan since the 4th book, I have eagerly awaited the release of each subsequent novel, read the next installment in less than 24 hours, then spent the next week moaning about what a dissapointment it was, how it just didn't live up to the previous novels and how I expected so much more. Now that the last book has been released and there are no more mysteries to be revealed however I can read these books in a totally different light - not racing through trying to find clues to the answers of the massive questions building up from the first book, but as entertainement, to get lost in JK's magical world for a while where wizards live amongst muggles, where all the things you dreamed of as a kid do exist in these pages - as well as stuff you could never have dreamed of.

The Half-Blood Prince is so named after a potions book Harry borrows from the cupboard as he had not purchased his own, but that is full of annotations and scribbles which not only turn Harry into the best potion's pupil of the year, but contains a variety of new spells Harry is sure the 'Prince' created himself, and that he uses throughout the year often unknowing of what will happen. This is the novel where Dumbledore finally tells Harry about Voldemorts childhood, about what steps the Dark Lord took to become what he has become, and how it is that he didn't die that fateful night all those years ago when the aveda kedavra curse rebounded on himself and stripped him of his body.

A dark book, I love the new focus on Malfroy's character (who was always secretly my favourite), the bigger roles of Snape and Dumbledore in the story, and the revelations of Voldemort's past - and trust me, these do not dissapoint. The book is dark, but interspersed through the melancholic moments are many laughs, and of course the never ending wit and charm of JK's writing.

It amazes me that there are still so many people out there who refuse to read these novels - they do not know what they are missing. These books are not masterpieces, I admit this freely, they do not have the same literary value of novels such as Birdsong, Emma, Great Expectations etc, but they still remain among my favourite books ever because they are little treasures that not only take me back to the hours of my childhood I spent pouring over Rowling's words, but because JK truly creates a world you can lose yourself in and care about. In short, these books are magic.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars the weakest but still stronger than the opposition, 3 Feb. 2009
By 
I was disappointed at a first reading of Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince. Mainly because not a lot seemed to happen: the magical number of seven books had to be filled, but you got the feeling that this one had little raison d'etre. At the end of Phoenix everything seemed to be in place for a final showdown between Harry and Voldemort, but pretexts are found for putting it off, and too many of the pages (mercifully fewer than in Phoenix) are filled with unnecessary back story which JKR could have written in her sleep - or fans could have written for her - while key characters like Ron, Hermione and Hagrid are left with almost nothing to do and nowhere to go.
Perhaps most infuriating of all, a key character for whom we had felt more and more interest and sympathy in books 1-5, wondering which way he would eventually jump, turned out to be unequivocally a bad guy. How boring is that? I trust and hope that this isn't Rowling's final word on Professor ... (supply name), but for the moment, things don't look good.

Still, with the tremendous pressure on her to deliver, I feel nothing but sympathy for JK Rowling, and would defend her to the last against the snide army of reviewers (some of whom can't even spell) who are keen to lump her together with cynical purveyors of dumbed-down mass culture, just because her books have made her a lot of money. May I remind everyone who calls the Harry Potter books production-line bestsellers that the first book in the series almost didn't find a publisher and became a success by word of mouth, not hype. The Harry Potter books fall into the same category as The Lord of the Rings and Watership Down as the work of true individuals who have reached deep down inside themselves to produce their visions, not just glanced around at what the crowd seems to want. It is for this very reason, I like to think, that they have struck such a tremendous chord - and it is for this reason, too, that the intellectual establishment hates them so much; it has staked its credibility on cheering on the end of western civilisation, and can't stomach popular art that is neither superficial nor despairing - that takes a moral line and carries a message of hope.

Look at how Rowling constantly deepens and toughens her moral outlook - even mighty Dumbledore's strength fails him, he meets disaster because he trusts too much, but the fact that he fails doesn't make him wrong.

And the sheer exhilaration of the way she plays with her material, so that points raised in the earlier books find new explanations or are seen in a new light, and you can never be sure whether it's pre-planned or she's having second thoughts and improvising, like a supremely talented jazz musician - this is something that emerges more clearly with repeated readings.

If horror is your thing, if all-action story-board-like adventure is your thing, even if perfection is your thing, go elsewhere. But if you want true, unique, individual creativity that doesn't mind wearing its flaws on its sleeve, stick with Harry Potter.

POSTSCRIPT AFTER READING HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: Well, what do you know, she fooled me completely!! Not that I'm hard to fool. This highly satisfactory last episode upholds everything good I've said about J.K. Rowling here and negates the bad: going through book 6 again, especially the opening chapter, after reading book 7 leaves you awed at the author's sheer cleverness. Professor ***** is the hero!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars To use the mother of all cliches - Magical!, 9 Aug. 2005
By 
I've been a huge fan of the Harry Potter novels since by parents first thrust The Philosopher's Stone into my hands on a family holiday as a young child. Admittadly I was slightly skeptical, especially considering the front cover. That was the first and last time I judged a book by its cover.
With that in mind, I was looking forward to book 6 with high expectations, Goblet of Fire had already made the first leap from a bloody good kid's book to a cracking adult's novel. With the stage firmly set for darker things in Order of the Pheonix, The Half Blood Price had a lot to live up to.
Simply, it does.
The Half Blood Prince, begins with a chapter that captured my interest immidiatly, a meeting between The Minister of Magic and our own "beloved" Prime Minister. It has to be said, this book has disposed of or recycled the traditional HP formula of "Harry goes to school, something happens to make him suspicious, he works all year to find out about it then fights it"
In Book 6 Harry is in a new, uncertain time in the Magical Community. The Wizarding World is at war! Ministry of Magic security posters cover the walls of Diagon Ally... And for once, nothing in Hogwarts is black and white.
In this book, Hogwarts reflects the wizarding world that houses it, enemies and allies are in the most unexpected places, and Harry may well be beyond the help of his friends as he has to come to terms with his destiny.
This revolutionary edition in the Harry Potter saga will never let you put it down until you finish the last page, and even then, you will hold it in your hands for the next few days, glancing at its cover every so often, and whispering the word... "wow"
JK Rowling has excelled herself and the scene has been wonderfully set for book 7, the nerve wrecking finale that with any luck will bring Harry and his Nemesis, Lord Voldemort into close combat, for it is true that
Neither can live while the other survives...
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince
Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince by J. K. Rowling (Paperback - 6 July 2009)
£8.99
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews