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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An insightful read for an open mind
I just finished Eat, Pray, Love, having actually read the follow-up, Committed, first, and wanted to air my thoughts in response to some of the reviews on here.

Firstly, to those accusing Gilbert as being 'all me me me,' well, yes. It's a biography. If it wasn't 'me me me' there would be no book. The thing about Gilbert's writing, though, is that she writes so...
Published on 3 Aug. 2012 by Jazzberry

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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Doesn't live up to reputation
I bought this book having seen trailers for the movie and thought it would be a good idea to read the book first as I had heard good things from others. While i would not say the book is awful as the writing style, at particular points, is very readable it certainly did not live up to my expectations.
Firstly much of what is described in the book seems so over the...
Published on 7 Oct. 2010 by StaceyFace


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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Doesn't live up to reputation, 7 Oct. 2010
This review is from: Eat, Pray, Love: One Woman's Search for Everything (Paperback)
I bought this book having seen trailers for the movie and thought it would be a good idea to read the book first as I had heard good things from others. While i would not say the book is awful as the writing style, at particular points, is very readable it certainly did not live up to my expectations.
Firstly much of what is described in the book seems so over the top it can be both unbelievable and slightly irritating. Parts such as the authors descriptions of the wonder of the Italian language spring to mind as does the incident where the author claims to have jumped from a decent height, injuring her back in the process, in order to attend a spiritual practise she claims to loathe.
While the first section of the book is reasonably interesting other parts, especially the middle section are dull and repetative.
I would recommend reading this book to form your own opinion however i would also suggest that if you do wish to read this book rent it from a library as it is definetly not one that I would assume many would care to read again
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49 of 52 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Get over yourself, 23 Mar. 2011
By 
WordWoman (Edinburgh, UK) - See all my reviews
I downloaded this book for my new Kindle and almost immediately wished I hadn't - after a few chapters, I had to abandon it as I didn't think the device could handle being thrown at the wall.

The author is a thirty-something journalist living a perfect, Carrie Bradshaw-style life with her perfect husband in their perfect home in New York. But one night she wakes up and realises this isn't enough for her. After a night spent writhing around on the bathroom floor, wailing and feeling sorry for herself, she finally decides God has spoken to her and told her to leave. Storming out of her marriage, she immediately shacks up with an inappropriate toyboy and blows up her divorce proceedings into the trial of the century.

Luckily for her, she has a generous editor who offers to pay her to go off round the world for a year and find herself (or perhaps they just really wanted some peace). So off she goes to Italy to live the cliche - the beautiful language, the gregarious Italian grandmas force-feeding her delicious pasta and ripe tomatoes, the long siestas, the passionate brown-eyed boys desperate to sleep with her... I understand she then goes on to repeat the same pattern in Indonesia (replacing the gregarious grandmas with ancient yogis feeding her spiritual wisdom), but I couldn't bear to read that far.

This could have been an interesting/inspiring read, but I couldn't get past the endless stream of cliches and the author's drama queen attitude. She needs to get some perspective and realise the world doesn't revolve around her.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An insightful read for an open mind, 3 Aug. 2012
By 
Jazzberry (Scottish Borders) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Eat, Pray, Love: One Woman's Search for Everything (Paperback)
I just finished Eat, Pray, Love, having actually read the follow-up, Committed, first, and wanted to air my thoughts in response to some of the reviews on here.

Firstly, to those accusing Gilbert as being 'all me me me,' well, yes. It's a biography. If it wasn't 'me me me' there would be no book. The thing about Gilbert's writing, though, is that she writes so honestly and with such an unapologetic desire to take the reader on her journey - her WHOLE journey - that, as a reader, I would have felt cheated if she hadn't opened up about herself as much as she did. I felt as though I was going on the journy with her, which is no mean feat given that I am about as spiritual as a cucumber.

Secondly, for the reviewers who cite her as disingenuous, I hope I never read a book with the cynicism that thyou have obviously brought to the experience.

I loved this book. I actually read it after having read Committed and, while it is slightly different in tone, I found it well-written, humourous and insightful. I completely empathised with each and every Liz, even if I did not sympathise entirely, and found it a pacy, nicely-structured account of an incredible year.

Read this book with an open mind and you will not be dissappointed.
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127 of 139 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars cliched, cinderella complex claptrap., 28 Aug. 2010
By 
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This review is from: Eat, Pray, Love: One Woman's Search for Everything (Paperback)
god it bored me. it's full of cliches of india, indonesia and italy and their traditions and culture. wow!! the italians make great ice-cream. doh!! thanks for telling me something i didn't already know...
if the most that american women can aspire to is to be like her, then i am not filled with any hope for them whatsoever. thank goodness i am not an american - she makes it sound like that country is in a vacuum, totally unaware of all the rest of the world has to offer. the hardest part for her seems to be getting her head around the fact that outside of america there is another, different, wonderful world.
what kind of book is this meant to be? autobiography? travel guide? self-help manual? it's the autobiography of the most sanctimonious, spoiled brat-bore ever. what's so exceptional about travelling when you're fully supported financially? anyone could do that if they were in the same situation. i am soooooo not impressed, and soooooo annoyed and frustrated by her 'look how wonderful i am' tone.
oh the monotonous, tedious, endless attention to detail. and the repetition. I GOT THE POINT THE FIRST TIME. STOP TELLING ME THE SAME THING AGAIN AND AGAIN AND AGAIN.
it's not all bad. my favourite character has to be her husband. well done to him for extracting all the compensation he could out of her. it tells me an awful lot about her when even her ex-husband hated her guts by the end. no wonder she avoided going into any detail about her first marriage - this is probably where the truth about her really lies ...
don't waste your time reading this garbage. go and see the film - julia roberts is worth a couple of hours of anyone's time - and then go and get a life of your own in your own way.
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404 of 445 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Self-pitying rubbish, 12 Nov. 2009
By 
Sally (London, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Eat, Pray, Love: One Woman's Search for Everything (Paperback)
I LOVE books, am a voracious reader, and I approach everything with an open mind, but there are no words to describe how much I disliked this book!

The book was recommended to me during the breakdown of my own marriage. I could definitely sympathise with the lead character in her first moments of despair (chapter 1), but thereafter I just wanted to give her a good shake and tell her to stop whining and wallowing in her own self-pity! I imagine this book might appeal to smug happy people, who can take a positive message of love and hope from it, but for anyone in a similar situation it is a big pill to swallow to feel sympathy for someone self-indulgent enough to get over her marriage breakdown by getting an all-expenses paid (publisher's advance) 12 month trip around the world!

In summary, "I'm married to a lovely man, live in a lovely (big) house in New York, have a good career and a family who cares for me but somehow this isn't enough for me so I feel I should destroy it all and nip off to eat my way around Italy and lounge around in Bali for a bit", does not endear you to a reader in my opinion.

I appreciate that this may sound like the rantings of a bitter woman, but I just wanted to offer an alternative review, as I know many people rave about this book. Call me cynical, but I'm pretty sure that anyone could find inner peace after a 12 month holiday! Unfortunately some of us have to come up with slightly more pragmatic ways of dealing with lifes ups and downs!
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158 of 175 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars how did this sell 8 million????, 26 Sept. 2010
This review is from: Eat, Pray, Love: One Woman's Search for Everything (Paperback)
I heard this was a terrific book passed like gold between fellow women of a certain age. All I can say is that the marketing department should get a very large Christmas bonus...

I tried to read it, honestly I did. In the end, after forcing myself to read meticulously through the firsts 150 pages, I did the unusual for me and flicked through huge boring sections of it until the last 30. For the life of me I can not understand why this book is so popular. It is SO derivative, and ridiculous. I can see that the writer knows how to do research here and there, and there is a fairly impressive bit of background and history thrown in, and also, she knows how to construct a novel which is what stops this yawn from being merely a rant.

But still!!

So she got fat while eating, no expense spared in Italy for three months. Then went to some reclusive ashram place in India and tried to be empty of all but herself - this is where I started skimming, to leave the poor woman alone! Then, literally, our poor tragic heroine rents the sweetest little place in Bali and "hangs out" for the final three months, talking to some old faith healer she had met on a previous magazine assignment, going t to various parties and get-togethers and then meeting the predictable dark handsome stranger.

What a total indulgent luxury!! All the while, this book is pierced with the agony of her miserable divorce. and, just in case we think her too shallow, she manages to raise an undisclosed sum of money to buy a piece of land for a single mother in Bali who happens to be a herbal healer of some sort. This plot is more or less disclosed on the back of the book before you start reading it, so don't worry, I have not given anything much away.

I know women who have gone through all this emotional pain and had to just get on with normal life at the same time, no breaks, no meditation, just bills, and sick family, and day jobs they hate, yet need to do. Yet, after a year or two, they come out of it too. WOW! What a miracle...
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40 of 44 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars BORING, 1 Sept. 2010
This review is from: Eat, Pray, Love: One Woman's Search for Everything (Paperback)
I bought this book because I had heard so much about it - I am sorry that I wasted my money. I found the book boring, while the idea of a woman rebuilding her life after divorce is certainly a good one - this book was in my opinion too self centered - me, me, me. Lots of woman and indeed men go through difficulties in their lives, but not many have the time or the money to drop everything and head off to Italy, India etc., they have to get on with day to day life as best as they know how.
I could not recommend this book but if you really want to read it to see what all the hype was about well borrow a copy from your local library - don't waste your money.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Eat Pray Love, 11 Oct. 2010
By 
This review is from: Eat, Pray, Love (Paperback)
Liz Gilbert has just got divorced from her husband and needs to have a bit of time out basically. So she goes travelling for a year.

This book is broken down into three sections. The first section is 'eat' and she goes to Italy. The second is 'pray' and she goes to India. Then the last section is 'love' which is set in Indonesia.

I loved the first section all about Italy and the food, but the rest of the book I found it so hard to get into, all the praying and finding god. I did read the book all the through as really hoped it would get better, but it did'nt!
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80 of 89 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Eh?, 6 Sept. 2010
This review is from: Eat, Pray, Love: One Woman's Search for Everything (Paperback)
There are clearly a lot of women who think of themselves as 'a spiritual person' who will like this kind of thing. I want to like it, especially as Elizabeth Gilbert is witty and not entirely un-self aware. But there's the nagging feeling that she uses her writing to establish and maintain the chicklit theme: Why I Am So Special And Everything Must Go My Way And Everyone Should Love Me The Most.

Then, there it is - proof! She writes a letter to God, asking for her divorce to come through. Instead of just asking for it, she justifies it by telling the Omniscient One that it's not just for her sake, but it's for the greater good of mankind and a vital step towards world peace. She implies that her prayer was immediately answered (though I'd like to think God was actually answering her husband's simultaneous prayer of 'Dear Lord, please get this harpie OFF MY BACK!') Even when she's writing to God she feels the need for self-justification, and tries to get one over on Him. So how are we, her mere mortal readers, to trust anything she writes for our benefit?

The same idea is much better done by Isobel Losada in The Battersea Park Road To Enlightenment.The Battersea Park Road to Enlightenment
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79 of 88 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A journey not worth spending time on!, 9 Oct. 2010
This review is from: Eat, Pray, Love: One Woman's Search for Everything (Paperback)
I bought this book after seeing Julia Roberts popping up all over the place doing publicity for the movie. Having got half way through the Indian section, I ended up throwing the book on the floor last night in disgust.

I cannot understand how such self indulgent twaddle has made it onto the best seller list in the UK - the author presumably is laughing all the way to the bank.

Many of us have been in situations that have made us deeply unhappy including divorce, but most of us I suspect do not have the funds/luxury of being able to up sticks and spend months eating and waxing lyrical about Italy, all the while bemoaning their sorry lot. How fortunate that the author was then able to spend even more time in an ashram in India to develop her so-called "spirituality", again not many of us have the luxury of being able to spend months at a time navel gazing.

I cannot even go to Bali with her, she's so self absorbed, self indulgent and selfish.

In my opinion, this is one of the worst books I have ever read. I'll be dropping it off at the charity shop later!
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Eat, Pray, Love: One Woman's Search for Everything
Eat, Pray, Love: One Woman's Search for Everything by Elizabeth Gilbert (Paperback - 5 Mar. 2007)
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