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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent. My favourite of the series
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire is definitely a pivotal point in the series. The first 3 books managed to get by on the novelty of Harry joining the wizarding world, coupled with the fact his life becomes under an ever increasing threat. This hasn't been exhausted, but isn't enough on its own to sustain a forth book or indeed the rest of the series. JK Rowling...
Published on 13 Aug 2005 by Chris Chalk

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3.0 out of 5 stars Good price but book is damaged
I bought this book for a really good price for a hardback BUT when the package arrived it came in no dust jacket and had spillage and pen marks on the spine and the ends were badly scuffed. I would like to think the book was 'acceptable' but they labelled it 'very good' which it wasn't. However, I got it for a very cheap price so I guess it's okay just to read.
Published 2 months ago by mrs deborah thurston


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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent. My favourite of the series, 13 Aug 2005
By 
Chris Chalk "Chris" (Croydon, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire is definitely a pivotal point in the series. The first 3 books managed to get by on the novelty of Harry joining the wizarding world, coupled with the fact his life becomes under an ever increasing threat. This hasn't been exhausted, but isn't enough on its own to sustain a forth book or indeed the rest of the series. JK Rowling appears well aware of this and decided to really expand not only Harry as a character, but also the world he operates in. This really allows the reader to be drawn into the fact we are observers in a world that is no less complicated than our own, and the dynamics within it are not black and white.
Harry begins the 4th years in dramatic fashion, a visit from the Weasley family doesn't quite go to plan, much to the dismay of the Dursley's, but this does not stop Harry from attending the Quidditch World Cup. For the first time Harry grasps the size of the wizarding world he is apart of, realising there must be many other schools all over the world to accommodate all the wizards that clearly must exist. Harry's enlightenment is short lived however, resulting in his trip being cut short, this though is forced to the back of Harry's mind as the elder male Weasley's are being delicately evasive with Harry, Ron and Hermione...
Harry returns to Hogwarts buoyed by his time at the Weasley's and just like everyone else at Hogwarts is instantly fascinated by the prospect of a replaying of an old school tournament played between the 3 greatest European Schools. Each school can only have one champion and to ensure fair play, the Goblet of Fire is used to big the entrants. Does someone have it in for Harry though?
This book really begins to highlight the strengths Harry is developing, highlighting his bravery and loyalty, whilst also showing that at times he is fallible, and when all said and done he is just a 14 year old boy...
The writing in this book is superb, the pace is spot on and although the book is lengthy you will race through it as if it was half the length. I really cannot give this book enough superlatives, the writing of JK Rowling has clearly improved and isn't as simplistic as the earlier books, maybe its because it's the middle book that this transformation has happened, or maybe it's just coincidence but whatever the reason, I am so glad it happened as this book really makes the series so far.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Exciting, engaging, entertaining, and well worth the wait!, 18 July 2000
By 
I now know I am not alone among thirty-somethings, who look forward excitedly to each new Harry Potter, and then feel something akin to a sense of loss upon finishing each book. I 'discovered' Harry in April, and since then have been waiting expectantly for book 4, which I read in just a few days (it would have been less, but my husband has started to feel a little neglected when Harry's around). This book did not seem to me to be any longer than the others, and it was just as enjoyable, if not moreso than all except perhaps book 3. I found it a gripping read, quite scary in places, although the sure knowledge that there are three more books to come, means that we can rest assured Harry will survive, and good will overcome evil.
JK Rowling's grip on her characters and the constant references to small details from the previous three books which help provide context and explanations as the stories unfold, are testimony to a brilliant mind in my view. Having read all four books now, like many other fans, I am eagerly awaiting the next book, and the one after that... I wonder do other readers feel like me, a sense of real friendhip with the three main characters? I really care what happens to them, and have even begun to hope fervently that Ron and Hermione are able to overcome their adolescent embarrassment and realise their true feelings for each other! Is there any hope for me? I have no children yet, but one on the way in February, and, boy or girl, I will be reading Harry Potter to them as soon as they are old enough to understand and enjoy as much as I do.
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34 of 38 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a must for long car journeys, 21 Aug 2001
By A Customer
We took this on holiday with us. We travelled from Aberdeen to Norfolk with hardly any complaints from either children or adults. Stephen fry kept us all rapt by his superb story telling. It is wonderful hearing the voices he has for all the different characters. We now have all four of these books on audio and they have been worth every penny.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Lots of great little touches, 9 Jun 2001
By A Customer
There were all sorts of little things that made me love this book. I work in a bookshop and on the day it came out we, like many other places had "Harry Potter Day". The games and costumes, however were not as good or as amusing as the sight of people of all ages and backgrounds poring over the book, unable even to take a break from reading for long enough to buy it and go home! I think we sold over 450 copies in one day? quite a stunning amount anyway.
The reason I am writing this was to point out a lot of the little touches that turn the books from great adventure stories into classics. To begin, though, this book is great. I would not agree that it is "too long" and think the criticisms about JK Rowling moving away from her "target audience" are daft. Would these same people cristicise The Lord Of The Rings for not being for the same "target audience" as The Hobit?! Why do we have to think about classic books in terms of "target audiences"? Even The Chronicles of Narnia dealt with gradually more adult themes throughout the books, ending with the death of all the main characters!
Little things that I really enjoyed in this paticular book were...
1. The ongoing love/hate relationship between Ron and Hermione, especially Ron's phrase "Hey Hermione...you're a girl..."
2. Harry and Ron's way of talking about the magical world's equivalent of "gear" i.e the Firebolt's aerodynamic perfection-this is so like some of my best friends that I laughed out loud.
3. The cartoonish world of the Dursleys has been dismissed as "cartoonish" but hey, cartoons are fun, and these episodes of the book really are funny. ("We didn't give it to him because he's a Muggle, we gave it to him because he's a great bullying git!") Without this humour, these scenes could be really quite dreary and void of hope, but we see things through Harry's eyes, and his defence against the Dursleys is to laugh at them.
4. The complex circle of relationships of Harry's parents' friends that emerges mainly in Azkaban, but develops further in this book.
5. Hermione's championing of the house-elves. I don't think it detracts from the plot. I also love the scene in which Winky becomes an alcoholic-very funny.
6. Hagrid's crush, arguement with and later friendship with Madame Malkin.
7. The whole Rita Skeeter thing-a nice satire.
8. One of my favourite scenes is when Harry goes to see Dumbledore and falls into the Pensive. Neville's background is something that most readers, like Harry and the others, would have taken for granted. Good reading.
9. The brilliant ending, of course. Can't wait to see that as a film, if it's well made. It seems silly to see the death of Cedric as a "cop-out"-if anything, the tension between Harry and Cedric over Cho throws Harry's feelings over the death into sharper relief. 10. However probably the thing that made me laugh most in the whole book was the fact that England didn't even qualify for the Quidditch World Cup but "went out to Transylvania in the first round. Bloody embarassing!".
Excellent entertainment, combined with deeper issues. Full marks.
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best ever supression of whingeing during long car journeys., 24 Aug 2001
By A Customer
This kept two children enthralled and two adults entertained on a journey from Wales to Scotland and back even though the boys and I had already read it. Anything that suppresses the 'Are we there yet' enquiries from the kids and all other whingeing and squabbling in the back of the car without boring me to desperation fully deserves a five star rating.
It is excellently read and well characterised. Yes, it is expensive, but will be used repeatedly and passed round to other desperate parents so is good overall value.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Four 'five stars' in a row, 2 Jan 2007
This book highlights the thrilling and dangerous Triwizards Tournament between the three most famous Wizardry schools , Hogwarts must compete against the French Beauxbatons Academy of Magic and Durmstrang Magical Institute (somewhere in northeastern Europe)

The champions chosen are the handsome and good-natured Cedric Diggory (for Hogwarts) , the famous Quidditch star , Viktor Krum (for Durmstrang) and the beautiful Fleur De La Cour (one of my favourites) (for Beauxbatons).

But someone has put Harry's name in the hat , and he to must compete , who is it? and why? Is somebody trying to get Harry killed? As the championships begin , other strange events are taking place.

Meanwhile Harry Ron and Hermione must deal with the poisonous pen of witch-journalist Rita Skeeter (A good lesson for children on how the media so often lie and distort things), while Hermione is absorbed in her own campaign for the rights and welfare of House-Elves.

Goblet of Fire , the fourth in the series adds depth to the Harry Potter saga , and in it we learn a lot more about Harry Potter's world , wizardry and Hogwarts.

A large book , but it go's quickly as it is 'unputdownable' by both children and adults. Full of mysteries and surprises as author Rowling has gained a reputation for in her Harry Potter series.

The film is also the best in the series.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Everything a grate book should be., 14 Nov 2005
By 
Nadia "Fleet UK" (United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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This book is one of my favourites of the series. In fact, it’s a toss up between this and Order Of The Phoenix. I think it is also written in an older and more mature style, which is fitting as Harry has aged with every book. I voted for this book in the BBC’s Big Read, because I felt it had all the elements that make up a truly wonderful book. It was extremely dark and atmospheric, but there was also humour, mystery, horror, (I was terrified during Voldemort’s reincarnation) plenty of imagination, and above all a hero that you could really identify with and feel for. Goblet Of Fire also has the bonus of being impossible to put down, and having an ingeniously worked plot with two fantastic twists that I never saw coming. The pacing is just right. The darker, more sinister scenes and the more light-hearted moments paced evenly throughout the book. Because the book is almost exclusively from Harry’s point of view, JK Rowling allows you to really get inside his head, to know his every thought and feeling, and to suffer along with him. I felt so sorry for him during his terrible ordeal in the graveyard. It was not to be the last time.
To my mind, this book has everything that makes up a classic, and I have no doubt the Harry Potter series will earn that title. JK Rowling certainly deserves it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Death? Yes Please!, 10 Mar 2005
By 
M. Goulden (Gtr, Manchester, UK) - See all my reviews
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It's tough being Harry Potter. You're famous, you almost die at least once a year, and you've somehow found yourself taking part in a Tournament you never even entered into in the first place. Can't you have a normal, quiet year for once? Of course you can't.
Yet, while Harry's finding things hard, his creator, Jo Rowling, makes it look like everything is incredibly easy. Her writing style, though far from impeccable (who's perfect?), is simply engrossing. She managed to turn over 650 pages into one of the shortest books I've ever read. I was done in hours, not days. You can't put this book down; you have to finish it, come hell or high water!
This is an incredibly dark novel. There are dragons that try to burn you to a crisp, there are so-called "unforgivable curses" that are designed to torture and kill. Most of all, people die. Yet, kids love Harry Potter. Why? Shouldn't they be getting nightmares? They don't because with these stories a perfect balance is struck between 'terror' and comedy. Jo Rowling injects a viciously witty and sarcastic sense of humour into her books - something much needed and much enjoyed by everyone. Not to mention, creating a well-rounded main character is key, and with young Mr Potter, Jo Rowling has done just that. His shy awkwardness around the opposite sex is especially played to great comic value, and why not? He is 14 now after all, and he is just like any other teenager.
Except he isn't. Harry isn't your average schoolboy. He is a complete misfit; his fame and cruel upbringing at the hands of the Dursleys leave him almost unable to forge new friendships, and things only get worse when he once more finds himself thrust unwanted into the spotlight. Lest we forget of course, that one dark wizard by the name of Lord Voldemort wants him dead. Yes, it's never easy being Harry Potter, but reading about him? Nothing is easier, or more fun, than that.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An absolutely excellent book, by any standards., 30 Jan 2005
By 
Ian Tapley "thefragrantwookiee" - See all my reviews
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THE STORY:
Harry is mysteriously entered into the dangerous Triwizard Tournament and fears that someone is planning to kill him. His fears prove to be merely the tip of the iceberg as the Death Eaters, Dark wizards, begin to return to prominence.
WHAT'S GOOD:
I was, for a very long time, a Potter-hater, sneering at the mention of his name. I was pleasantly surprised by the first three books of the series, but was astounded to find that this book immediately became one of my all-time favourites. I'm not sure when the last time was that a novel so gripped me that the hours just whizzed by without me noticing (probably not since 'Magician' by Raymond E. Feist). There are so many levels to the plot that it keeps you entranced as to how each separate storyline will be resolved. One of my favourite elements (surprisingly, since I'm not usually into that sort of story) was the romantic tension building between Ron and Hermione; and Rowling somehow manages to perfectly break-down and utilise the exact sort of nervousness that a teenage boy feels when around a girl he likes (as happens to Harry). Perhaps best of all is the growing feeling of something bigger and more terrible to come (a feeling akin to thunder in the distance), a feeling that reaches a shocking level at the end of the Tournament, outside the Riddle house.
WHAT'S BAD:
Only that the story is far from over when you reach the last page.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Dragons, Dark Marks, Death Eaters...and Girls, 28 Jun 2004
The fourth book in the "Harry Potter" series, "The Goblet of Fire" was first published in 2000 and deals largely with Harry's fourth year at Hogwarts. As the book begins, Harry is spending his holidays at Privet Drive. Although things have improved for him there since he started attending Hogwarts, the holidays are still far from enjoyable. He is thankfully rescued with an invitation to spend the last few weeks with the Weasley family at the Burrow. Better yet, the Quidditch World Cup Final - between Ireland and Bulgaria - is being played in England, and Harry, Hermione and most of the Weasley clan will be going to it. Mr Weasley, who works at the Ministry of Magic, had used some contacts at work to get the tickets. Some of his colleagues are at the match as well - for example, Barty Crouch (who is also Percy's new boss at the Ministry) and Ludo Bagman (a former professional Quidditch player). While Harry finds the event hugely enjoyable, it all goes pear-shaped : the celebrations are ruined by the appearance of a group of Death Eaters (supporters of Voldemort) torturing some Muggles and the appearance of the Dark Mark (Voldemort's symbol) in the sky.
The international theme is kept up throughout the book - on reaching Hogwarts, the pupils find out that a Tri-Wizard Tournament will be held during the school year. This is a very famous competition between the three largest European Schools of Wizardry and Witchcraft - Hogwarts, Beauxbatons and Durmstrang. One champion is selected to represent each school and - due to the difficulty and danger of the tasks involved - only students of 17 and over will be allowed to enter. Naturally, this means that - if the rules are adhered to - Harry won't be allowed to enter. Among the visiting students from Beauxbatons and Durmstrang are Victor Krum - who played Seeker for Bulgaria in the World Cup Final - and the highly attractive Fleur Delacour. Naturally, they don't arrive unsupervised - the Headmistress from Beauxbatons is Madame Maxime (who, incredibly, is around the same height is Hagrid) and Professor Karkaroff, from Durmstrang (where, they say, pupils actually study the Dark Arts).
Inevitably, there's another new Defence Against The Dark Arts teacher at Hogwarts. This year, it's an ex-Auror by the name of Mad-Eye Mooney. An Auror is a Dark Wizard Catcher, and Mooney is widely regarded as one of the best ever. He is now, however, considered a little paranoid - for example, he drinks only out of his own hip flask. 'Mad Eye' is a pretty apt description - he has one 'normal' eye and one magical eye, which can see through doors, walls, invisibility cloaks and even through the back of his own head. There's more to be coped with than new teachers though - teenage hormones are now starting to affect our hero and his friends. Harry has taken a shine to Cho Chang (Ravenclaw's very pretty Seeker), while Ron - FINALLY - notices that Hermione is actually a girl.
"The Goblet of Fire" is comfortably the longest one to date - at no point, however, does the story drag or feel 'stretched'. J.K Rowling has written another excellent book, and has given Harry and his friends another very enjoyable mystery to solve. Like all the other books in the series to date, it's very easily read and will be enjoyed by both children and adults. It probably would be better reading the series in order - certain things about the wizard's way of life and other characters are covered fully in the previous instalments. However, that shouldn't be too much of a burden, as the previous books are also very enjoyable !
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Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (Celebratory Edition)
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (Celebratory Edition) by J. K. Rowling (Paperback - 3 Oct 2005)
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