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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Jensen the Interceptor
After reading Nest of Vipers a few years ago, I've always kept a roving eye out for Linda Davies' books - which never seem to feature particularly prominently in British bookstores. This is a pity because she writes really good thrillers. The heroine of her first book - Sarah Jensen - is back with a bang in Davies' latest novel. Clearly the substantial gap between her...
Published on 30 Oct 2001 by A. Fitzgibbons

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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Bit of a yarn but is knitting baby clothes?
This is not up to Linda Davies's usual depth and complexity. However, the book is up to her usual ability to spin a page turning yarn - based in the world of banking.
I saw the posters in the Moorgate tube station - Something Wild. I was sorry I hadn't kept up, she had another book out and I hadn't realised. Then I read the blurb - the word "rockstar" came up and...
Published on 16 Nov 2002


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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Jensen the Interceptor, 30 Oct 2001
By 
A. Fitzgibbons "Fitz" (London, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Something Wild (Hardcover)
After reading Nest of Vipers a few years ago, I've always kept a roving eye out for Linda Davies' books - which never seem to feature particularly prominently in British bookstores. This is a pity because she writes really good thrillers. The heroine of her first book - Sarah Jensen - is back with a bang in Davies' latest novel. Clearly the substantial gap between her last book and this latest one is as a result of marriage and kids, as Davies' experiences as a mother play a key role in the ongoing character development of Sarah Jensen (though where Jensens' negative attitude towards men comes from I'm not quite sure). It's genuinely very difficult to put the book down, but is also sufficiently lightweight in thinking ability to be able to read pretty quickly. My twin sister came over to see me yesterday - she picked up the book, read the book flap, said it looked [rubbish], read the first page, and she was still reading five hours later. Case closed.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Follow the money" to the heart of the Mystery, 16 Nov 2003
This review is from: Something Wild (Paperback)
Pop music has always had an ambiguous relationship with money. Ever since Elvis music has been regarded as seductive and threatening to the established order - but also as a high road to fame, riches, and the adoration of the opposite sex. In the popular media the pop music business, precisely because it IS popular, enjoys or suffers a degree of exposure that few other industries get. The British tabloid press is more associated with sex than securitisation. What or who could possibly get a bond issue into the headlines? The answer is David Bowie. By some his bond deal in the late 1990's was regarded as a form of "selling out" - as if icons of his calibre had never been interested in money before! By others the deal was regarded as giving banking a bit of rock and roll glamour. Both viewpoints were somewhat superficial. If you dig deeper there is a much more interesting and enlightening story, as this novel reveals.
Something Wild is mystery set in the music business. The plot hinges on the attempt to set up a "Bowie bond" deal and Linda Davies succeeds in plotting a path through the maze so that the people who would not normally touch the financial pages of a newspaper can appreciate what is involved and the complexities of securing such a deal serve to build up the tension of the plot. The central figures of the story are a charismatic rock star - who comes across as a composite of Bruce Springsteen, John Denver and Robert Redford - an a beautiful banker, Sarah Jensen who will be familiar to readers of Linda Davies's first novel, Nest of Vipers. During the Watergate scandal in America which brought down President Nixon in 1974, the informant known as "Deep Throat" told investigative reporters to "follow the money" to get to the bottom of the mystery. This is what Something Wild does. By following a fictional Bowie bond deal it sheds new light on the world of rock music.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Best thriller available since her last one!, 14 Nov 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Something Wild (Hardcover)
Another superb nailbiter - the detail of her activities is enough to draw you in, but not too much that baffles or bores you.
New, interesting plot, with angles not previously written to death by others.
Would do well not to go on and on about breastfeeding - I'd have to warn any man I recommended to read the book to persevere and read past these mostly unecessary bits. Hope she hasn't gone gooey since having her own children.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Bit of a yarn but is knitting baby clothes?, 16 Nov 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Something Wild (Paperback)
This is not up to Linda Davies's usual depth and complexity. However, the book is up to her usual ability to spin a page turning yarn - based in the world of banking.
I saw the posters in the Moorgate tube station - Something Wild. I was sorry I hadn't kept up, she had another book out and I hadn't realised. Then I read the blurb - the word "rockstar" came up and I have to admit I did not divert immediately to the book shop. A rockstar? I think the choice of word puts it in a limited age group. The 40+ have rockstars. The >30 have Pop Idols. Those on their 30s, well who knows? (Maybe they have foot on both pedestals - this would be good for Davies's sales.)
I'm sorry but "rockstar" conjured up images of those popular in the 70s and early 80s - perhaps still strumming or whatever, but then, that's up to them.
Eventually I bought the book and thought "give it a try". It stands up to Davies's other books quite well, but does home in on new mothership. (First baby, not Star Trek!) There are a few passages consigned to the experiences of breast feeding; and one would have been enough to give the reader a feel for Jenks's circumstances. (The others would be better placed in a National Childbirth Trust leaflet.)
Prejudices aside I read on and on and on... It is a page turner. The workings of the city of London are key and it is a good mystery. There's just too much emotion and single family stuff to make it directly comparable to her earlier thrillers.
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5.0 out of 5 stars a great book, 9 Feb 2012
This review is from: Something Wild (Hardcover)
I have read this book quite a few time simply beacuase I love it, even though I know the story well, I still enjoy it, I love the way its is written, its fast pace, great characters and lovely ending for those who are romantics like me, and it deserves 5 stars, I keep looking for linda to write something new please......

Just to note I am an avid reader who loves all sort of books, and is never with one on the go, this has got to be in my top 3 best reads.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Patchy , may appeal to romance readers., 6 Oct 2002
By 
LW Jolly (Reading, Berkshire UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Something Wild (Hardcover)
However how dark the cover is, this is a romance novel. It has all the characteristics of the Harlequins I read when I was 10 years old.
Flawless heroine (beautiful, talented, smart) has an unexplained mistrust of men, particularly the handsome, talented, sensitive hero, Heathcliff with a guitar. Add a few picture-postcard settings. Heroine flees, keeps secret of her amazing, angelic infant son who is so perfect, in fact, that he doesn't dirty a diaper the whole novel. Too much gushing about how only having children gives your life meaning (ugh).
Throw in baddies right out of an 80s thriller--the psycho who has no motivation for what he does, he's just a psycho--the gigolo, the weaselly financial wheeler-dealer. Add a couple stalking scenes. Ooh scary. The plot chugs on like clockwork, characters doing Such Illogical Things in order to move the plot along and increase the tension. Real Baddies eventually exposed and lovers united although the heroine has lied to the hero all along. Forgiveness either unneccesary or given offscreen (frankly, I was hoping he'd tell her where to get off, but he's Too Sensitive).
The only well-realized and interesting bits of this book were the financial aspects. The author, a former banker, makes financial dealings come alive even to me, who flinches at the sight of a bank statement.
The really human characters were minor to the romance/thriller plot--financial wizards, members of the secret cabal that sent heroine on her mission, and suspects. These were the only people I truly wanted to learn more about--what happens to Jezza, P.J., Savage, and the "Iranian princess"? Those characters weren't as saccharine as the rest, and I'd loved to have seen more out of them.
The other aspect of this book that is THOROUGHLY explored is breastfeeding and weaning. I found this distasteful, as I can only read so many passages about engorged milky breasts before feeling slightly ill. And a baby that NEVER has tantrums, crankiness or gas is a little creepy.
In all, you won't find any surprises here. This would be a fine distraction on an airplane or beach--it will kill a few hours, but if you should mislay it or get it wet in the pool, you won't shed any tears.
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Something Wild
Something Wild by Linda Davies (Paperback - 4 Nov 2002)
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