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on 25 August 2000
Roger the Chapman cannot sit still! This traveling medieval peddler, romantic, and private detective cannot stand to be cooped up at home, where he should be attending to his daughter and mother-in-law, but he can't. Sometimes on his own volition, sometimes at God's beck (or so he claims!), Roger is always "on the road again."
In Kate Sedley's sixth episode is this rather delightful series, we find our Roger on an errand by the Duke of Clarence: deliver a young girl to the home of her finance. It seems that the groom-to-be hasn't shown up to fetch her himself and the Duke hasn't the time to take her either. Enter Roger.
Alas, it turns out that the intended, one Peter Gildersleeve, seems to have disappeared as if by magic, or more ominously, taken by the Devil, or so some folks in this 15th century story want to believe. Not two days after Roger has delivered the comely Cicely to her betrothed's home, but the groom's brother, too, disappears. What follows is Roger's dedication to solving the mystery, which seems to hinge around an ancient parchment that appears to give clues to an long-lost treasure (Could it actually be the Holy Grail?). Before its conclusion, murder and mayhem--but not much mystery-- prevail and before you know it, Roger is once again the winner.
In "The Brothers of Glastonbury," however, Sedley becomes all too predictable and her mystery almost fizzles out. Her Roger's character, as always, is enough to keep us
reading--he's more complex than he wants you to believe, he's less naive than he seems, he's quite clever, especially with riddles, and he's a man after our own hearts: a free spirited individual, one who genuinely wants to do Good and is adamantly opposed to Evil. He really cares for his daughter (left motherless at birth) and mother-in-law, although he admits that the marriage was not what he had really wanted in the first place (an "accidental" pregnancy following one night of unexpected passion brings about the "honorable" wedding, of course, as Roger is, among other virtuous things, honorable! In the last three books of the series, Sedley has teased us with hints of impending romances with characters he meets. He senses that the really should marry someone (this time for love!) and settle down, if for nothing else his daughter's sake.
Regardless, "The Brothers of Glastonbury" is a good read--perhaps not a great read, but worth the effort. It lacks the intensity, the thrill of "The Wicked Winter," but still a good bet!
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on 28 June 1999
Medieval crime novels - in the style of Ellis Peters' Brother Cadfael stories - continue to be popular while there continues to be much interest in the legends of Glastonbury and King Arthur. Kate Sedley brings both of these areas of interest together in "The Brothers of Glastonbury", an entertaining medieval mystery set in the "Isle of Avalon". I enjoyed this book and would recommend it - though my favourite Glastonbury-related historical novel is still Marguerite Steedman's "Refuge in Avalon", published in 1963.
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VINE VOICEon 20 January 2006
Roger the Chapman cannot sit still! This traveling medieval peddler, romantic, and private detective cannot stand to be cooped up at home, where he should be attending to his daughter and mother-in-law, but he can't. Sometimes on his own volition, sometimes at God's beck (or so he claims!), Roger is always "on the road again."
In Kate Sedley's sixth episode is this rather delightful series, we find our Roger on an errand by the Duke of Clarence: deliver a young girl to the home of her finance. It seems that the groom-to-be hasn't shown up to fetch her himself and the Duke hasn't the time to take her either. Enter Roger.
Alas, it turns out that the intended, one Peter Gildersleeve, seems to have disappeared as if by magic, or more ominously, taken by the Devil, or so some folks in this 15th century story want to believe. Not two days after Roger has delivered the comely Cicely to her betrothed's home, but the groom's brother, too, disappears. What follows is Roger's dedication to solving the mystery, which seems to hinge around an ancient parchment that appears to give clues to an long-lost treasure (Could it actually be the Holy Grail?). Before its conclusion, murder and mayhem--but not much mystery-- prevail and before you know it, Roger is once again the winner.
In "The Brothers of Glastonbury," however, Sedley becomes all too predictable and her mystery almost fizzles out. Her Roger's character, as always, is enough to keep us reading--he's more complex than he wants you to believe, he's less naive than he seems, he's quite clever, especially with riddles, and he's a man after our own hearts: a free spirited individual, one who genuinely wants to do Good and is adamantly opposed to Evil. [...] "The Brothers of Glastonbury" is a good read--perhaps not a great read, but worth the effort. It lacks the intensity, the thrill of "The Wicked Winter," but still a good bet!
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on 24 December 2013
Kate sedleys Roger the Chapman stories are great ...I ahave read most . Exciting interesting and talk you back to the time of the Roses wars
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on 22 March 2013
A copy of this is in my local library but I decided to own my own. Now have 7 books
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