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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Makes ecological debt accessible
This is an exceptionally engaging and human book for a very weighty set of issues. I bought this book for several friends at xmas who I have trouble engaging in what is the biggest human rights and inequality issue of our time - climate change. This book really ties in the human impact story to the climate change agenda. It's amazing how many people haven't...
Published on 31 Jan. 2006 by Miss L Greene

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2 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing presentation of important ideas
The book presents novel and important ideas concepts in global evironmental and economic issues.
Having read the reviews which hinted that the book was written with verve I was also hoping for some inspirational reading but found it monotonous in style with much repetition.
In its preface it indicates the book is in two halves, the first outlining the problems...
Published on 15 Jan. 2006 by Rory


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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Makes ecological debt accessible, 31 Jan. 2006
By 
Miss L Greene (London United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Ecological Debt: The Health of the Planet and the Wealth of Nations (Paperback)
This is an exceptionally engaging and human book for a very weighty set of issues. I bought this book for several friends at xmas who I have trouble engaging in what is the biggest human rights and inequality issue of our time - climate change. This book really ties in the human impact story to the climate change agenda. It's amazing how many people haven't made this link. Andrew Simms writes in an exceptionally engaging and imaginative way. It took me a couple of chapters to warm up, but by the end I was totally hooked - reading for pleasure, not education and writing my list of who else to buy it for.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Economical account of our current environmental status, 2 Dec. 2009
By 
Alison "Kindle Allie" (Derbyshire, UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Ecological Debt: The Health of the Planet and the Wealth of Nations (Paperback)
I picked this book up after reading Andrew Simms book, Tescopoly. His writing had impressed me and this book is the same. Just as Tescopology this is an engaging and compelling writing on a complex topic with many thorny issues.

It's rather thought provoking and even if you have doubts about some of the ecological arguments surrounding global warming, you will be interested to read about the attitudes of governments to less arguable issues of pollution and usage of finite resources.

Simms doesn't just go on and on about climate change, although that is a central theme, he also examines the economical impact of global warming (regardless of its cause). There's much about living within our means (as a planet and as individuals) and a really interesting chapter on second world war economies in the face of reduced resources.

An excellent economical account of our current environmental status and how we need to change in the face of our changing climate. Recommended.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A damn good read, 5 Jun. 2005
This review is from: Ecological Debt: The Health of the Planet and the Wealth of Nations (Paperback)
Most books about global warming - important though the issue is - tend to be a little on the worthy side, and deeply depressing. This book is neither. There are worrying facts, but the verve with which Andrew Simms writes, the stories he includes, as well as the photographs and bizarre illustrations, make this one of the key texts for the debate, and the most readable. It not only deserves to be read - not least for the important introduction to a whole new idea (eco-debt) - but it actually will be.
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A pleasure to read, 3 Feb. 2006
By 
Benito Muller (Oxford, England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Ecological Debt: The Health of the Planet and the Wealth of Nations (Paperback)
Simms has managed to write an essay on a difficult, complex and pressing issue in extremely accessible terms which are a pleasure to read and can be unequivocally recommended to anyone interested in poverty and the state of the environment.
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3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, 1 Mar. 2006
This review is from: Ecological Debt: The Health of the Planet and the Wealth of Nations (Paperback)
This book was amazing, written in a lucid, succinct way that will inspire thought and action. Its easy to get to grips with, has many enlightening anecdotes and personal experiences, and is often shocking. Read it and enjoy it!
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2 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing presentation of important ideas, 15 Jan. 2006
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This review is from: Ecological Debt: The Health of the Planet and the Wealth of Nations (Paperback)
The book presents novel and important ideas concepts in global evironmental and economic issues.
Having read the reviews which hinted that the book was written with verve I was also hoping for some inspirational reading but found it monotonous in style with much repetition.
In its preface it indicates the book is in two halves, the first outlining the problems and the second outlining possible solutions. It felt however that the former occupy 99% of the book and there is little thought in the way of practical or realistic solutions.
Overall I thought that the book opened up some important concepts in terms of Global Commons but didnt get much further than exploring the current problems.
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