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35 of 35 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Astonishing and incendiary stuff. An absolute MUST READ
Ok, we all knew that Bush couldn't have won the election without some shenanigans, but Greg Palast blows the lid off corruption on a scale that's hard to imagine. How he got through all the red tape and obstructions put up to stop him getting at the truth is amazing.
When he then shows how corrupt are the people in Blair's close circles, you stop feeling secure in...
Published on 10 April 2002

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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Disturbing!
If you ever wanted evidence of the back-room dealings in the Labour government, the rampant self interest of lobby groups or the un-ethical practices of some of the UK and USA's best known companies (US Wal-Mart, Exxon, RBS, etc.) this is the book for you. It deserves 5-stars based on that alone - we need more journalists like Mr. Palast.
Where I feel the book is...
Published on 3 July 2002 by D. Martin


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35 of 35 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Astonishing and incendiary stuff. An absolute MUST READ, 10 April 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: The Best Democracy Money Can Buy: An Investigative Reporter Exposes the Truth About Globalization, Corporate Cons, and High Finance Fraudsters (Hardcover)
Ok, we all knew that Bush couldn't have won the election without some shenanigans, but Greg Palast blows the lid off corruption on a scale that's hard to imagine. How he got through all the red tape and obstructions put up to stop him getting at the truth is amazing.
When he then shows how corrupt are the people in Blair's close circles, you stop feeling secure in anything. Top that with the machinations of the IMF and World Bank in Latin America, the big business at the heart of political decision making
and you want to move somewhere far away, like Alaska. Except that the Exxon Valdez got there first. Read this book - it shows the world as it is, not as they like you to believe it is.
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22 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The buzzing of business, 5 Jan 2006
By 
Stephen A. Haines (Ottawa, Ontario Canada) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
Years ago, we watched, through blurred vison, Peter Sellers in Doctor Strangelove. The blurring was either from the hilarity or the grief the film inspired. The dialogue could double us over with mirth, while the story directly confronted us with our mortality and that control of our fate resided with such devious leaders. Greg Palast evokes an identical response. He chronicles the stolen election of the world¿s most powerful leader, how the International Monetary Fund and World Band exercise immense control over national destinies, and how the rich increase their influence and income at our expence. He keeps us charmed with his wit, while reminding us of our near-helplessness in the face of mighty, but hidden, forces.
Every essay in this collection jolts the reader. It¿s like turning over a rock or breaking open a rotten log - the ugly grubs exposed bring revulsion and dismay. How does life produce such distasteful creatures? Palast exposes the putrid path of the Bush dynasty, the betrayal of the British voters by "New Labour" and the intrigues of international corporations in Asia, Africa, Latin America. How, he asks, do we allow these people to gain their ascendancy over our lives? One answer lies within our favourite ideal community - the small, rural, American town. There, he notes, avaricious investors have overturned local attempts to retain their values to instil the symbols of corporate enterprise These blights on our landscape are made welcome - "they boost the economy"!
Palast¿s concluding set of essays, how the Blair government sold out the British populace would bring tears to the hardiest. He shows how corporate executives and their agents have become an "arm of government" in policy making and implemetation. The arm has a long reach, extending from New York banks and government offices in Washington. Centre to these revealing articles is the overthrow of a tax on shopping mall car parks. The deal, engineered by a major corporation was part of an overall plan to "head the [Labour] government in a different direction." In other words, reverse the policies that were the foundation of Labour¿s successes at the polls. Blair¿s real foundation is "America¿s enterpreneurialism," the drive for global markets which "projects corporate powers onto one tiny, cold island" welcomed by its "always-grinning native chief." Blair prides himself on "listening to industry" before formulating policy.
Palast has few peers as an investigative journalist. Of necessity, he must shield his sources, which keeps us mildly suspicious. Are things really THAT bad? Unfortunately, as time passes, his assertions are substantiated, restoring our faith in his reporting. As an investigative journalist, the solutions for many of the social ills he reports are lacking here. And so they should - the solutions lie with his readers. This book isn¿t a prescription for what besets us, but a learning tool. He notes cases of how success against corporate indifference has been achieved. Find out how to tap in to $1.04 TRILLION available to those without adequate local banking services. Read this book to understand what is happening around you and take the first steps to implement the cure. It's your choice. [stephen a. haines - Ottawa, Canada]
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant....but scary !, 20 Aug 2003
Greg Palast manages to expose the total lack of principles and the total domination of self-interest within the world of politics and big business (the bigger the better it seems !).
The scary things are:-
1. Why do these people get away with it ?
2. If they are this cynical in their methods, what will stop them doing whatever they want in future without retribution ?
3. If Palast is being discredited, why have they never taken him to court over these stories ? (i think I know that one !).
Read this book to open your eyes ! Vote accordingly !
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Disturbing and Brilliant, 12 Oct 2002
This review is from: The Best Democracy Money Can Buy: An Investigative Reporter Exposes the Truth About Globalization, Corporate Cons, and High Finance Fraudsters (Hardcover)
Greg Palast is a hero fighting at the front line. He is fighting to uncover the sordid truth behind the corporate world and the very unhealthy relationships between politicians and "big business".
His work is documented and his evidence irrefutable.
He conclusively shows how corporate greed, under leadership and cover of the IMF and World Bank, is tearing apart South America and developing economies. If that is not bad enough, he shows how the same tactics are being deployed in advanced nations too!
He shows that the struggle between the "haves" and "have-nots" is not between countries but between a small group of fabulously wealthy individuals and the rest of humanity.
The disturbing thing about this book is that it shows that the world is so open and vulnerable to such exploitation and plundering, thanks to the complicity of politicians. Every time a politician talks about "market forces", be afraid - be very afraid!
What can we do to resist?! A good start would be to read this book. At least we will be better informed.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Well worth reading, 6 Oct 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: The Best Democracy Money Can Buy: An Investigative Reporter Exposes the Truth About Globalization, Corporate Cons, and High Finance Fraudsters (Hardcover)
This is an interesting, thought provoking, and occasionally amusing book in the by a writer with a similar view of the world to Michael Moore. Some of the content of the book, e.g. how Bush stole the election, covers the same ground as Moore, but in more detail. As a British reader i found the section on Blair's complicity in much of the Bush/big business love-in interesting and disturbing, though unfortunately not surprising. The only critisism of the book is that it concentrates a little too much on America, but i suppose that is where the story is. I thoroughly recommend this book.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Book That Everyone Should Read, 4 Jun 2003
By A Customer
This book really opens your eyes to what politicians give priority to.......namely keeping themselves in power. Palast makes many damning accusations against the Republican and Democrat parties in the US and also the practices of 'New Labour' he then goes on to discuss the gross abuse by the World Bank and IMF where dealing with developing nations.
What I find interesting in all this is that, to my knowledge, no-one has ever brought a liable case against either the publisher or author........what does that tell you?
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Couldnt put it down., 15 April 2003
By 
Andrew Hicklin (Worcester, England) - See all my reviews
This book should be a must read by law, it is absolutly fantastic. I literally have sleep deprevation from not putting the book down. Im not any revoultionary yet
after reading the book i just wanted to storm parliament. Anyone who finds the modern view that "greed is good" should seriously take a look at the horrors in this book. My one bit of advise dont read the book all at once, you'll get so mad you wont calm down for at least a couple of days
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Read this book!, 5 May 2003
By 
J. French (Haywards Heath) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This book is most likely to appeal to those who consider themselves already among the politically cynical, and within the "anti-globalisation" groupings. But, whatever your political stance, I urge you to read it.
Palast deals with some of the most important issues facing us today, and, significantly, he backs up his position with detailed evidence, including quotations and admissions from some of those involved. This takes the debate to a whole new level.
For example, you may well have heard about how Bush "stole" the last US election - you certainly will have done if you have read "Stupid White Men". But here you will see absolutely hard evidence of the deliberate, conniving scam that took place - and which no one seems to care about. Palast's revelations are absolutely extraordinary. He "follows the money" and discovers hard proof about scandals, greed and bribery from the Florida election, to the Californian energy crisis to our own shores in the UK.
Rest assured that what he writes about will affect YOU.
You may not yet be in the situation of those in Bolivia who are protesting in the streets, but your schools, hospitals and other public services will be affected by the trends he wries about.
The media tends to ignore many of these stories. This book gives you the chance to read about what the mainstream media don't have the courage to print. TAKE THIS OPPORTUNITY!
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Disturbing!, 3 July 2002
By 
D. Martin (London) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Best Democracy Money Can Buy: An Investigative Reporter Exposes the Truth About Globalization, Corporate Cons, and High Finance Fraudsters (Hardcover)
If you ever wanted evidence of the back-room dealings in the Labour government, the rampant self interest of lobby groups or the un-ethical practices of some of the UK and USA's best known companies (US Wal-Mart, Exxon, RBS, etc.) this is the book for you. It deserves 5-stars based on that alone - we need more journalists like Mr. Palast.
Where I feel the book is stumbles is Greg Palast's writing style. While it is a feature of his writing and makes the book entertaining, the emotive innuendo's can become a bit too much and sometimes just a little abrasive, especially when trying to get sceptical readers to take in what he is saying. Also, a lot of what Palast states, which I don't doubt is true myself, has to be taken on face value. Apart from a few pages of documents there isn't anything else available in the form of references. If this kind of journalism is to be taken seriously and indeed, if it is to be quoted, we need to be able to back up our sources. Just saying "Greg said so" or "I saw it in the guardian" is not enough if you want to be taken credibly. I would have liked to have seen an online reference, as in Chomsky's - Understanding Power. As it stands it is difficult to counter anyone who refuses to believe what this book offers.
All the same, if you are comfortable with these negative points I think we would all do well to take in what Greg Palast has to say, now and in the future.
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29 of 31 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Care about democracy? Care about anything?, 6 Nov 2003
If the answer to either of these questions is yes not only should you read this book you should try to get everybody you know to read it too.
Everybody knows that politicians are dodgy characters to put it mildly (and after reading this it's hard to keep it mild - I want to scream these "expletive deleted"s are taking the piss) but the extent of their outrages and the contempt they show for the public is truly shocking.
This is not an anti-Rebublican rant. The collusion of the Democrats in much of the immoral and often downright criminal activity outlined here is apparent and Bill Clinton's behaviour is possibly more reprehensible because the man doesn't have George Bush's excuse of limited intelligence.
Neither is it anti-American. It is a condemnation of the abuse of power and so focuses on the powerful, this means primarily America.
The UK does not come out of this well and Mr Blair's supine aquiescence to the desires of the powerful whether political or financial is both frustrating and embarrassing for me as a UK citizen.
The book is very readable, the writing style is humourous which is no mean feat considering the subject matter. If Palast is sometimes guilty of an emotional subjectivity then I think that is the rational response of any human being to the facts he presents.
Reading this book may not change your life, but it should.
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