Customer Reviews


7 Reviews
5 star:
 (4)
4 star:
 (3)
3 star:    (0)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 
Most Helpful First | Newest First

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Theatrical murder, 4 Sep 2012
By 
Damaskcat (UK) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Peregrine Gay falls down a well at the disused theatre known as The Dolphin. This unpleasant event leads the owner to change his mind about demolishing the building and instead it is restored to its former glory and its first play is one especially written by Peregrine himself. Unfortunately the caretaker is murdered and a glove thought to have belonged to Shakespeare's son which was on display at the theatre is apparently stolen.

Roderick Alleyn who had overseen security arrangements at the theatre is called in to investigate the murder which proves to be complex. The cast of the play are not immune from suspicion and they are a well realised collection of theatrical types including an obnoxious child actor. I found myself really hoping he would come to a bad end!

As ever this is a well plotted mystery with interesting characters and motivations. I really enjoyed reading it and trying to work out who was responsible for the murder and the robbery. I recommend Ngaio Marsh's novels if you want crime stories without graphic violence. They can be read in any order.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Who dun'it at the theatre, 18 July 2011
A look into the way a theatre works, produces a very interesting outlook on several colourful characters. The strange owner,Vassily Conducis, who seems to have something to hide and the various love triangles, produce all the possible reasons for murder. When it happens, it is the least likely of victims, the night watchman, and Alleyn has to unravel all the strands before he can reveal the culprit.

A very intricate look into how a play comes together and the complex characters involved, all with their own egos. I found it very enjoyable, totally absorbing and I almost felt I was there watching the play. The ending provided quite a satisfactory feeling that the play would go on and as always with Ngaio, the love interest also succeeds.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Another theatrical setting, 8 April 2014
By 
Aletheuon (Wales UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
Death at the Dolphin is the twenty-fourth Roderick Alleyn whodunnit and was published in 1967. (It was called Killer Dolphin in the US). I think Ngaio Marsh was really at her best in the thirties and forties, in the Golden Age of women mystery writers, and she sometimes seemed more uncomfortable when she tried to write about themes relevant to the sixties and seventies (she wrote about Alleyn from 1934 until around 1982). In this book, she returns to one of her favourite settings - the theatre.
The Dolphin theatre has had bomb damage during the war and is in danger of being demolished. It is owned by the immensely wealthy Vladimir Conducis. Peregrine Jay, a director and playwright, goes to look round it, falls into a water-filled pit and comes close to drowning. Fortunately, Conducis rescues him and takes him to his own home to recover. There, he shows him a child's glove, purporting to have belonged to Hamnet, the son of William Shakespeare.
Jay then writes a play about Shakespeare, his family and two significant people mentioned in his sonnets. Out of friendship for Jay, Conducis saves the Dolphin and Jay's play is put on there. The glove is displayed in the theatre and the play is successful, although an actor called Hartly Grove causes friction among the cast. Then a night watchman is murdered and a child actor injured...
As ever with Ngaio Marsh, the theatrical background is vivid and the characters of the actors wittily described. Characterisation is her greatest strength, with plot growing out of character (on the whole).There's some interesting information about Shakespeare, too, as a background to the story. The plot moves along at a good pace and there are plenty of twists and red herrings. Marsh is in her element in this setting. She isn't as ingenious as Agatha Christie, but in my opinion, she is a better writer and has an elegant, economical and often beautiful style. Her love of the theatre is obvious (she revived the New Zealand live theatre almost single-handedly, working as a director in touring productions) and she writes about actors with a kind of barbed affection.
Some of the characters in 'Death At the Dolphin' reappear in 'Light Thickens', Ngaio Marsh's final book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars A nice Ngaio Marsh, 1 Oct 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I always come back to these novels. They are slightly dated but they are so well written and character driven that they are still wonderful. I particularly like the theatrical ones, like this. The characters are attractive and the plot nicely complex. The Dolphin theatre appears in several of her best novels.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Good buy, 31 Aug 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
To add this to your collection is a fantastic read. I have a lot of Ngaiao Marsh and every one is great.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Trapped, 20 Mar 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Ngaio Marsh is to my mind the outstanding mystery writer of her vintage and all her books are elegant and most are excellent. I personally like best those featuring Inspector Alleyn's wife, the painter Agatha Troy, and second best those set in the theatre, of which this is one. A young director in inspecting a derelict theatre which he wants to restore and open again when he falls through a trap in the stage and is nearly drowned in stagnant water before being rescued by a mysterious millionaire. Who wouldn't read on?
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Convoluted, 8 Dec 2012
By 
Mrs. E. A. Harvey (England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
As A
always with the Alleyn stories they take a lot of concentration but are delightfully well mannered and satisfying
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Death at the Dolphin: Complete & Unabridged (Inspector Roderick Alleyn Mysteries)
Used & New from: £14.95
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews