Customer Reviews


12 Reviews
5 star:
 (9)
4 star:
 (2)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


24 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars All work and no play
This is a really interesting read especially if you're under the hammer at work and feel burned out.

The workplace has changed radically in the last 25 years. Our response to this is to work longer and longer hours, neglect our diet,exercise,family/personal time and the reality is that by working in this way we probably achieve less and perform poorly...
Published on 15 July 2010 by rich arnold

versus
18 of 22 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars An OK read but not life changing
I'll start with a confession: I'm not a fan of management or self-help books, nor of management "gurus". Too often what they say is trite and condescending, opinions are trotted out as facts and simple messages are padded out with waffle and arbitrary diagrams, invariably using quadrants.

The criteria I used to judge this book were: does it contain any new...
Published on 3 April 2011 by Marc d'Aboville


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

24 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars All work and no play, 15 July 2010
This is a really interesting read especially if you're under the hammer at work and feel burned out.

The workplace has changed radically in the last 25 years. Our response to this is to work longer and longer hours, neglect our diet,exercise,family/personal time and the reality is that by working in this way we probably achieve less and perform poorly.

I don't believe that an athlete would run faster if he ran the same race over and over again without recovery
Nor would an F1 car with a single set of tyres/breaks be as fast on Lap 50 as 1-10

Quality over quantity? Makes sense to me! We work best when our energy is at its highest and this book will show you how to renew and increase energy.

If like me you're an employee who's wasted his kids childhood working late at the office or staring at a blackberry during the night or on holiday....read this book!

If you're an employer with staff like that...shame on you!....Buy the book and HELP THEM...you'll see the benefit!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It's not just a book it's my new best friend, 30 Sept. 2010
It's taken me a little longer to read than a normal book because i thought i'd put it to the test and live it. Having lived this over the past months i can truely say hand on heart this has changed the way i think about myself and the way i approach my working life. Right from the start, the book drew me in, I realised i was one of these working machinces that my company had created. I was in a trap of long hours, travelling, missing meals, no excercise with high demands to deliver results. This book really does emphasise the importance of recovery and the need to reflect and energise yourself to maintin peak performance.
Once you believe and accept the need to change, you simply have to do it. Having lived this i now practice and promote this in the workplace, the results are quite remarkable with the levels of engagement and performance clearly visible.

you don't survive and win by working longer hours you do this by being smarter, this book really does lay the foundations of doing just that.
his isn't just another management book that you put in the top drawer when you have finished reading it,it's the new way of working.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Dynamic yet common-sense solutions to changing the way you work, 14 Jan. 2011
By 
Rolf Dobelli "getAbstract" (Switzerland) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This is one of those rare books that details the wrong ways you're working without making you feel that the situation is hopelessly complex or beyond repair. Tony Schwartz (writing with Jean Gomes and Catherine McCarthy) offers interesting, practical advice to employers and employees alike on how to banish that "gerbil on a treadmill" feeling forever. With case studies from such companies as Ford, Sony and Ernst & Young, as well as helpful charts, graphs and exercises, this highly readable manual will make you think twice about how you and your employees work. Although it mentions lots of insider human resources (HR) methodologies - such as the ones in Gallup's employee engagement surveys - the book never bogs down in jargon. However, the author may need to revise and update it in a few years as the workplace becomes increasingly dependent upon technology. getAbstract suggests this book to frustrated leaders, HR practitioners, overwhelmed employees and anyone who wants more control over his or her working and personal life.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The new energy bible, 19 July 2010
Having followed Schwartz/Gomes/McCarthy Energy Project for some time I am intrigued as to the impact this book will make on organisations and the individual. Broken down simply the concept is that time is finite, so the route to increasing capacity is through a managed approach to our energy needs. Whereas previous attempts at the subject have honed in solely on the physical and nutritional aspects; this book looks far beyond this demonstrating that energy can be optimised not just by our physical state, but also by our emotional one.

Life changing - potentially! I can commend this book to any individual seeking a way to avoid "Burn out" and increase their energy. For them this should be more than a "good read", it probably needs to become a "bible".

However, where the real power of this book could be harnessed is for an entire organisation to embrace the philosophy. It's been tried, but to my mind no organisation has yet created an energy optimised work force. Maybe just maybe this book may provoke some company to give it a real go - there's a competitive advantage out there for anyone who can successfully adopt it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Working smarter not harder, 22 July 2010
I see this book as an essential manual - a How To book for leaders seeking better ways of working in these turbulent times. We are always living in changing times, but the chaotic events of the past couple of years have forced many companies into a fundamental re-think about how they can survive and thrive today.

This timely book takes a simple but very powerful thesis: that energy is more important than time, and we can work much more effectively by applying this principle in four key areas - Physical, mental, emotional and spiritual. The latter two have been filtering slowly into management thinking in recent years, but Tony Schwartz places them centre stage, arguing that a truly successful business must integrate each of these elements in order to be truly successful.

The empirical evidence is that companies engaged with Tony or his co-author Jean Gomes have been consistently impressed by these tools and techniques in action, and have the results to prove it. So this is a manual rooted in experience, and written in a clear compelling style. If you buy one management book this year, make it this one.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars How to establish and then sustain an energy-efficient, productive, and enjoyable workplace, 6 Aug. 2010
By 
Robert Morris (Dallas, Texas) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
Marshall Goldsmith wrote a book in which he asserts "What got you here won't get you there." In this book, written with Jean Gomes and Catherine McCarthy, Tony Schwartz takes that insight a step further, asserting "What got you here won't keep you here, much less get you there." He insists, and I wholeheartedly agree, that with very few exceptions - such as the companies that are annually ranked the most admired, the best to work for, etc. - most companies have a workplace that is dysfunctional and perhaps even toxic. He cites the results of a recent global workforce study by Towers Perrin (90,000 employees in 18 countries in 2007-2008) that are comparable with the results of recent research by the Gallup Organization: on average, less than 20% of a workforce are actively and productively engaged, about 40% are capable but not fully committed, and a similar percentage are disenchanted or actively disengaged.

In his earlier book, The Power of Full Engagement co-authored with Jim Loehr, Schwartz offers a number of sensible recommendations that will help to increase the number of actively and productively engaged workers in a given organization. Perhaps his most important insight is that energy must be managed effectively. As have Malcolm Gladwell, Geoff Colvin, Daniel Coyle, and Matthew Syed in their books, Schwartz cites research conducted by Anders Ericsson and his associates at Florida State University to explain the relationship between natural talent and superior performance. "Great performers, Ericsson's study suggests, work more intensely than most of us do but also recover more deeply. Solo practice undertaken with high concentration is especially exhausting, The best violinists figured out, intuitively, that they generated the highest value by working intensely, without interruption, for no more than ninety minutes and no more than 4 hours a day."

This revelation has profound implications for increasing productivity wherever people are involved (e.g. workplace, schools, colleges, universities). Schwartz suggests that there are four categories of energy needs that must be accommodated for people to work at their best: physical, emotional, mental, and spiritual. Only by fulfilling these generic needs can we fulfill corresponding needs: sustainability, security, self-expression, and significance. The illustration of all this on Page 9 bears at least some resemblance to Abraham Maslow's "Hierarchy of Needs."

The challenge for work supervisors as well as for those for whom they are responsible to (1) recognize and understand various multidimensional needs; (2) respond effectively to those needs with prudent but sufficient expenditure of physical, emotional, mental, and spiritual energy; (3) remain acutely aware of the impact and consequences of what they say and do; (4) think inclusively while respecting differences; (5) avoid or overcome what James O'Toole characterizes as "the ideology of comfort and the tyranny of custom"; (6) rest to re-energize ("sleep or die"); (7) sustain commitment to regular exercise and proper nutrition; (8) create a environment that is "energy efficient" is terms of its workers' physical, emotional, mental, and spiritual health; (9) provide leadership to ensure the energy efficiency of that environment; and (10) define a set of shared values and a purpose beyond profitability that unites everyone involved.

Re this last point, that is precisely what Dave and Wendy Ulrich so eloquently recommend in The Why of Work: How Great Leaders Build Abundant Organizations That Win as does Simon Sinek in Start with Why: How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone to Take Action. Those who are thinking about reading this book need to keep in mind that most people prefer a "known devil" to an "unknown devil": Their fear is not really of change but of what is unfamiliar. Most change initiatives fail because initial expectations are unrealistic (with all due respect to what Jim Collins calls "BHAGs" or Big Hairy Audacious Goals), ultimate benefits are over-sold, and those who will be most affected by the changes have little (if anything) to say about what will be changed and by what process.

Of course, Tony Schwartz is well aware of all this and wrote a book, this one, in which he offers a cohesive, comprehensive, and cost-effective/energy-efficient program in which almost everyone within a given enterprise will become and then remain actively and productively engaged. They will demonstrate what Lao-Tzu suggests in my favorite passage from his Tao Te Ching:

"Learn from the people
Plan with the people
Begin with what they have
Build on what they know
Of the best leaders
When the task is accomplished
The people will remark
We have done it ourselves."
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book, 21 July 2010
I have been fortunate enough to participate in the energy training 3 years ago. It has transformed my private and personal life. I am now able to re-energise on demand by following simple tasks and processes. The four sources of energy are explained within 4 modules; physical, emotional, mental & the energy of the human spirit in a highly experiential way. I do not allow myself to run out of energy with all the consequences associated with it.

The book is there to remind me of this great training. It allows me to remember all techniques and to optimise my energy level at all time.

Buy this book, it will be the best think you have done for yourself in a very long time.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Building on the Breakthrough, 6 July 2010
By 
Mike Pegg (United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
Some books change people's mind sets. 'The Power of Full Engagement' by Tony Schwartz and Jim Loehr was such a book. The sub-title 'Managing Energy, Not Time ...' provided the key for many people. Some companies chose to embrace the ideas and encourage their people to harness their physical and psychological energies. Jean Gomes, who co-authored this new book, led the way in pioneering these approaches inside businesses. The title of this book is 'The Way We're Working Isn't Working', but it goes much further. It provides positive models and practical tools that will enable people, teams and organisations to achieve peak performance. Building on their earlier breakthroughs, the authors show how people can perform brilliant work. "Take the best and leave the rest," is always a good motto. But there are masses of ideas in this book that readers can use to enjoy fulfilling lives.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


18 of 22 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars An OK read but not life changing, 3 April 2011
I'll start with a confession: I'm not a fan of management or self-help books, nor of management "gurus". Too often what they say is trite and condescending, opinions are trotted out as facts and simple messages are padded out with waffle and arbitrary diagrams, invariably using quadrants.

The criteria I used to judge this book were: does it contain any new insights? (one or two); is it well written? (it's OK); will it change my behaviour? (no); will it change the behaviour in my team or my organisation? (no).

I scribbled notes in the book as I read it and the word that appeared most often in the margin was "trite". Apparently "we live in a world of infinite distractions and endless demands." OK great, thanks for that. I also found out that it helps to get a good night's sleep and that in some cases depriving people of sleep has been used as a form of torture. Wow, I never knew that.

The book focuses on themes such as diet, exercise, sleep, creativity, energy and spirituality, offering various tools and techniques for getting the most out of ourselves. It may well be useful for the stressed, overweight, coffee-guzzling career-obsessed employee lacking self-awareness (let's call him Jeff). However, Jeff is unlikely to persevere with the book unless he has to and he will probably benefit far more from personal counselling or an enforced training programme. The book is probably less useful for the self-aware individual who exercises, has a balanced diet, enjoys a number of creative and social outlets and has a happy family life (let's call him Dave). Dave and his team may also thrive on the buzz of multi-tasking, juggling priorities, managing demanding stakeholders, enjoying a chat about sport during a (shock horror) cigarette break, going for a beer after work and so on. Perhaps Dave intuitively already "gets" the need for balance, "renewal" time etc.

Crucially, I failed to see the value of the book in promoting effective organisational rather than personal change. The authors admit in chapter 3 that they have come to the organisational side of things late in the day. Apparently "broad culture change depends on buy-in from the top". I'll remember to mention that to our CEO next time we're chatting in the office gym over a vitamin juice. Apart from getting buy-in, it wasn't clear to me what I / we needed to do next to make sure that the way we are working is working. For example, a lot is made of "power napping" but how do you implement this logistically in a large and vibrant open plan office, never mind culturally?

For those of you whose pleasure in reading derives partly from the quality of the writing, I'm afraid you are likely to be disappointed. The grammar is poor in parts and there are a few made up words. "It's begins with self-awareness"; "it was clear that he was deeply invested in his work"; "midafternoon"; "it does induce asleep" etc. Humour is also not high on the agenda and this is a pretty dour read.

So what about the positives? There are some very good quotes and insights from a wide range of people, including scientists, philosophers, poets, CEOs and religious leaders (maybe pinning up the odd Zen saying on the notice board could have a positive impact on our working day?). There are interesting snippets of information about various studies that have been carried out. I'm sorry to say I loved the rather cruel experiments, e.g. where diners' soup bowls were continually refilled through a pipe under the table without their knowing it, or where some secretaries had see-through glass bowls of chocolates while others had them in opaque containers (you have to feel for those poor secretaries who kept seeing the ever so tempting chocolates out of the corner of their eye don't you?).

In conclusion, there is a certain irony in reading a work related book about work / life balance when you could be spending the time relaxing with your family, being creative, doing sport or whatever. So what would I do if I could rewind my life and invest the time I spent reading this book in doing something different? I'm afraid I would do something different, like having a good nap maybe.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars It's not time management it's energy management, 15 April 2013
By 
Rod Matthews - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Way We're Working Isn't Working (Audio CD)
Are you working over 10 hours a day non-stop in an effort to be more productive? Then you are fooling yourself. We are not machines and as humans we pulse. We take energy in we expend energy, we work we rest, we are awake, we sleep. Tony Swartz argues that it is energy more than time that we need to bring to our work to be more efficient. Some timely reminders of what is obvious and yet seemingly forgotten by millions of people everyday."
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The Way We're Working Isn't Working
The Way We're Working Isn't Working by Catherine McCarthy (Audio CD - 5 Aug. 2010)
£16.99
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews