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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Business Paradox: Less Really Can Achieve More
This is a new and expanded second edition of a book first published in 1996. Of special interest to me was what Womack and Jones had to say in the preface regarding what has since happened to the companies previously discussed. Apparently lean thinking has enabled Toyota, Wiremold, Porsche, Lantech, and Pratt & Whitney to sustain operational excellence and economic...
Published on 25 Sept. 2005 by Robert Morris

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1.0 out of 5 stars MISLEADING SALE PAGE FROM AMAZON
The sales page was completely misleading. I bought a used book and received a new audio book. Really a bad experience, never again. It took me couple of minutes to find a cheaper alternative to Amazon. The book was a real paper book and I didn't complain.
Published 12 months ago by MARAINI FRANCESCO


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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Business Paradox: Less Really Can Achieve More, 25 Sept. 2005
By 
Robert Morris (Dallas, Texas) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This is a new and expanded second edition of a book first published in 1996. Of special interest to me was what Womack and Jones had to say in the preface regarding what has since happened to the companies previously discussed. Apparently lean thinking has enabled Toyota, Wiremold, Porsche, Lantech, and Pratt & Whitney to sustain operational excellence and economic prosperity.
Briefly, how do Womack and Jones define lean thinking? It is the opposite of muda (a Japanese) word for anything which consumes resources without creating value. In a word, waste. Lean thinking is lean because "it provides a way to do more and more with less and less -- less human effort, less equipment, less time, and less space -- while coming closer and closer to providing customers with exactly what they want." Lean thinking is thus a process of thought, not an expedient response or a stop-gap solution. The challenge, according to Womack and Jones, is to convert muda into real, quantifiable value and the process to achieve that worthy objective requires everyone within an organization (regardless of size or nature) to be actively involved in that process. Once again, in this new edition they address questions such as these:
1. How can certain "simple, actionable principles" enable any business to create lasting value during any business conditions?
2. How can these principles be applied most effectively in real businesses, regardless of size or nature?
3. How can a relentless focus on the value stream for every product create "a true lean enterprise that optimizes the value created for the customer while minimizing time, cost, and errors"?
In Part IV, Womack and Jones update the continuing advance of of lean thinking. They rack the trend in inventory turns and the progress of their profiled companies. Also of special interest to me was the discussion of what Womack and Jones have learned since 1996 which probably explains why they introduce a new range of implementation tools support value stream mapping initiatives and thereby "to raise consciousness about value and its components, leading to action."
Obviously, even if everyone involved within a given organization is committed to lean thinking, to creating value while (and by) eliminating waste, the process requires specific strategies and tactics to succeed. Hence the importance of the last chapter in this book., "Institutionalizing the Revolution." I presume to suggest that the process of lean thinking never ends. Inevitably, success creates abundance; abundance often permits waste. I also presume to suggest that priorities must first be set so that the implementation of lean thinking process does not inadvertently create or neglect waste in areas which influence the creation of value for customers.
Although highly readable, this is not an "easy read" because it requires rigorous thinking about what is most important to a given organization, rigorous thinking about the root causes (rather than the symptoms) of that organization's problems, and rigorous thinking about the most prudent use of resources to eliminate those problems. Because of the importance of the material which Womack and Jones share, I strongly recommend that decision-makers read and then re-read this book before getting together to exchange reactions to it. Out of that discussion, I hope, will come both a collective commitment to lean thinking and the personal determination of each executive to apply what she or he has learned from this book in operational areas where waste has most diminished value.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Becoming Lean and Mean!, 27 Aug. 2008
The only way to be competitive in the world marketplace is to be much more efficient. In other words "lean and mean." Efficient at engineering, efficient at manufacturing and efficient at meeting/exceeding customer expectations are all keys to becoming more competitive.

This book and their Machine that Changed the World are good resources for manufacturing facilities more lean. And...lean thinking leads to more lean thinking.

Using the Toyota system as a guide, Womack and Jones address how companies can eliminate waste and increase profits. They write:

"Our earnest advice to lean firms today is simple: To hell with your competitors; compete against perfection by identifying all activities that are muda and eliminating them. This is absolute rather than a relative standard which can provide the essential North Star for any organization."
Well written with many telling examples. Recommended!

The Re-Discovery of Common Sense: A Guide To: The Lost Art of Critical Thinking
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Learning Experience, 8 May 2012
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This review is from: Lean Thinking: Banish Waste and Create Wealth in Your Corporation (Audio CD)
Having read this book I thought I'd try the audio version and I was not disappointed. A thoroughly compelling listen and I was able to absord so much more than reading (Perhaps that's a personal thing for me). I have to agree that James Womack's tone is a little grainy but once you get past that then you should embark on an enjoyable learning experience.

Great stuff.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent for Course work, 23 Aug. 2013
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This is exactly what I needed for the MSC that I am study, the seller delivered the product before they said they would and it was really well packaged. It was sold as a second hand copy, but quite honestly it looked as though it had never been touched. I would recommend this seller to anyone.
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1.0 out of 5 stars MISLEADING SALE PAGE FROM AMAZON, 10 April 2014
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This review is from: Lean Thinking: Banish Waste and Create Wealth in Your Corporation (Audio CD)
The sales page was completely misleading. I bought a used book and received a new audio book. Really a bad experience, never again. It took me couple of minutes to find a cheaper alternative to Amazon. The book was a real paper book and I didn't complain.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Good content - pity about the narrator., 15 Aug. 2010
By 
S. Barclay (Wales, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Lean Thinking: Banish Waste and Create Wealth in Your Corporation (Audio CD)
Read the first edition, many years ago - it was excellent. Thought I'd like to try the audio version of the updated edition. Some good extra and updated comments/case studies, but the monotone delivery style of Womack makes it a far from easy listen.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent read, 14 Mar. 2013
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I would always recommend this read to anyone interested in this type of topic. It prepares a reader for many aspects of business, especially lean thinking application.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Lean and Mean 2, 8 Feb. 2013
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Mr. Alistair Jones "AliDaMan" (Scotland) - See all my reviews
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Just started using this book as it is recommended reading for my Masters degree in Operations and Supply Chain Management. One of the Lean bibles...
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Lean Thinking: Banish Waste and Create Wealth in Your Corporation
Lean Thinking: Banish Waste and Create Wealth in Your Corporation by Daniel T. Jones (Audio CD - 1 Aug. 2003)
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