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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars BUY IT
Unity is brilliant. In around 400 pages S.D. Perry writes humourously, caringly and affectionally, she makes the characters real and you really will feel for them all. Lots of strands are brought together and many concluded but some are left dangling, enticing you to come back to the universe of the DS9 relaunch in 2004. This book is so brilliant I could not pick it up...
Published on 10 Dec 2003 by Matthew Harrison

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars great, but slightly disappointing
i loved reading another ST:DS9 book and this was another well written book, to match the earlier books. i was slightly disappointed at the way Sisko was brought back. for me it was a bit anticlimaxical as it seemed to lead up to a high note then play a lower one. i was disappionted that the end happened so quickly,and with the way the Bashir/Dax relationship seemed to be...
Published on 19 July 2004


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars BUY IT, 10 Dec 2003
By 
Matthew Harrison (Totton, Southampton) - See all my reviews
Unity is brilliant. In around 400 pages S.D. Perry writes humourously, caringly and affectionally, she makes the characters real and you really will feel for them all. Lots of strands are brought together and many concluded but some are left dangling, enticing you to come back to the universe of the DS9 relaunch in 2004. This book is so brilliant I could not pick it up because I knew if I did then it would eventually be finished and when I got to the end (for die-hard fans of DS9 the last chapter will bring a tear to your eye) it would be over. I reccommend getting the previous books in the series to get up to speed on the many new characters although there is a timeline telling you what has happened since the end of the Dominion war. I cannot praise this book highly enough, all I can say is Buy it and savour it.
PS- I am not affiliated with S.D.Perry at all or pocket books, even though it may seem that way with my begging you to buy it. Honest.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars great, but slightly disappointing, 19 July 2004
By A Customer
i loved reading another ST:DS9 book and this was another well written book, to match the earlier books. i was slightly disappointed at the way Sisko was brought back. for me it was a bit anticlimaxical as it seemed to lead up to a high note then play a lower one. i was disappionted that the end happened so quickly,and with the way the Bashir/Dax relationship seemed to be neglected, after so much time in the last several books being devoted to their growimg relationship, to very little in this. i was also disappointed at the lack of Kira/(wont say who) as i thought that more could have been said for these two being reunited. all in all well written and a good end, but could have been soo much better, though i suppose these things will work themselves out in the next lot of books
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Now *this* is an ending!, 5 Dec 2004
By 
David Roy (Vancouver, BC) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Unity (Star Trek: Deep Space Nine) (Mass Market Paperback)
With Unity, by S.D. Perry, the first section of the continuation of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine is concluded. It's a nine-month arc that carries through the pregnancy of Ben Sisko's wife, Kasidy, and how the station has functioned since Ben was taken away by the Prophets to exist outside of "linear time." Perry started the whole shebang with Avatar, so it's only fitting that she be allowed to end it as well. Unity is an explosive conclusion that ends a few plotlines, continues a few others, and sets the table for any future books to come. It has to deal with the Ben Sisko situation, bring back a lot of other Deep Space Nine characters, and also tell an exciting story. Can any one book do all of that? Thankfully, yes. Perry hits one out of the park with Unity, creating a book that I literally could not put down (I had to force myself a couple of times, but that was it).
Perry throws everything except the proverbial kitchen sink in there, yet the story doesn't feel overstuffed. Every Deep Space Nine character is seen in some capacity, no matter how briefly. The threat to the Federation is handled extremely well, with the tension so thick you could cut it with a phaser. Perry brings it all together with aplomb, never feeling rushed and allowing the characters to reflect a little bit on what's been going on. Many of the ongoing storylines are resolved (Vaughn's and Kira's especially, but also the "should I stay or should I go" routine from both Ro and Quark) and others get new directions (such as the O'Briens, who have come to the station with Joseph Sisko for the birth of Kas' child). The direction that O'Brien's story takes is actually very interesting, and is leading to a good story in the first Worlds of Deep Space Nine book, so that's good news. It's also good to see everybody again, seeing how they interact and fall into the relationships that had been put on hold when they went their separate ways. Perry does this and still gives us a story filled with action and adventure.
Perry does still give us a little humour, though. One scene involving the threat and its interaction with Taran'atar (the Jem'Hadar character, who is one of the few to get short shrift) is very abrupt but hilarious, adding a little levity to the whole proceedings. Overall, though, the mood is dark and Perry allows you to feel every bit as nervous as the characters feel. She's so vivid in her descriptions that she even makes you feel Kas' labour pains. Now *that's* effective! Perry has a beautiful style that keeps you involved with the characters, wanting to go just that little bit farther. Especially effective are the scenes in the asylum with "Eli" and Benny, as Vaughn wallows in his guilt and Benny tries to help him. I have complained about the excess angst in the Mission: Gamma books, but here the angst is used for a purpose that I found interesting, and thus it didn't become as annoying as it did in those books. This angst is the very problem Vaughn has to deal with, and it illuminates not only Benny's character as he helps, but also Opaka's character before the asylum sequence. The scenes between Opaka and Vaughn are wonderfully written, with lines such as:
"Of course," she replied, recognizing his need for control, or what he believed that to be. It was unfortunate that he struggled so. Over time, she'd come to believe that the only true emotional infirmity was denial; once a thing was accepted, it could be met without fear. She wished she could tell him that it was no weakness, whatever he was fighting against, though she suspected that he would perceive her comment as intrusive."
Unfortunately, a couple of characters are sidelined to make room for all of this. I already mentioned Taran'atar, but the other one is Dr. Bashir. He does a few things and he has a few lines, but he doesn't really impact the reader at all. His main function is to do research on the problem at hand and to be concerned for Ezri. This doesn't make him a very interesting character, but he has had a lot of time in the spotlight recently, so I guess it's justifiable. Any other flaws in the book are extremely minor and steamrolled by the quality of the rest of the book. At the end, they're flattened to irrelevance by this steamroller of a story, and I have to say that I enjoyed this book very much. The ending is simply wonderful, especially the scene in Kira's office which brings the entire series full circle, with Kira repeating a line that she used in the opening story, Emissary, to great effect. The whole sequence is touching and this story is effectively over. Nevertheless, there is much groundwork for future stories to begin, and while some of the placesetting is a little awkward and trite (especially Quark's ending), the rest of it makes me desperately wish for more stories to come soon. That's the sign of a good conclusion, and just reinforces why Deep Space Nine is my favourite Trek.
David Roy
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Concludes then re-ignites, 1 Mar 2004
I read this novel in one sitting and it is brillent. I will not spoil the surprises near the end of the book but I will say story lines are concluded but new ones are kick started and i'm a big fan of the series in fact i will say its the best trek series. The ending of the book makes you smile, a whole new wealth of stories are ready to be told and there are loose ends that will surely lead to even bigger things. Unity is a great novel and it is the conclusion of seven seasons of great drama and all i can say is more more very soon.
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3.0 out of 5 stars A bit slow for a finale, 23 Aug 2007
By 
Matthew Notley (Guildford, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Unity (Star Trek: Deep Space Nine) (Mass Market Paperback)
As the end of the so-called "Season 8" of DS9, I had expected this book to pull out all the stops and be a tour de force in terms in story. I was left disappointed in that regard. The narrative is extremely slow going until the final pages of the book, indeed there are long passages where nothing is really happening, but we are teased with what is yet to come.

When taken in perspective with the entire DS9 Relaunch saga, it fits in well however. The stunning plot revelations, when they do finally occur, are fantastic to behold.

After Perry's previous books in the series, I had expected something much more exciting. It does all lead up to a great "season finale" in the end, which means I am looking forward to continuing, but the majority of the book itself is a let down.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Perfect, 18 Jan 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Unity (Star Trek: Deep Space Nine) (Mass Market Paperback)
Old library book look but doesn't have any writing in it, nice plastic cover as well incase of spillage .
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3.0 out of 5 stars Sequels galore, 13 Feb 2009
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This review is from: Unity (Star Trek: Deep Space Nine) (Mass Market Paperback)
As a story on its own, it is out of context but put it together with "The Lives of Dax" and "Star Trek: Worlds (Trill)", it is inspired because so much about Trill is secret, you can write almost anything!
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars ambivalent, 28 Nov 2003
Pocket Books have managed to create a very authentic season 8 of Star Trek Deep Space Nine in a series of books that started with SD Perry's 2 parter Avatar (and a comic book story called N-Vectors, collected in the tpb Alternate Realities) and concludes here in Unity. Kasidy Yates is preparing to give birth to her child prophesied as the Avatar. Bajor is riven by secular and religious turmoil, with the return of the missing Orbs, the spreading of a new religious movement and the recent assasination of the First Minister. The planet is under seige by the parasites, providing a poor welcome for the weary crew of the Defiant as they return from their long exploration of the Gamma Quadrant. The return of Jake Sisko and previous Kai Opaka is marred by a Cardassian incursion, and the Alpha Quadrant seems poised for disaster.
It is a difficult job to pull all the threads together, and I give credit to Pery for trying, but somehow the effort does not quite gel. Most of the book deals with the threat of the parasites and their sudden attack. While there are some startling revelations concerning their origins it is't really explained entirely, and the conclusion to their threat is a little sudden and unexpected and haphazard. I'm not sure if i like the way the Prophets intervene but in a way it ties up one loose thread from season 6.
Most of the plots get some kind of resolution but not entirely; obviously the editors want to keep a few hanging to prepare for the next wave of novels, but i felt a bit disappointed. At least the ending manages to fit 3 dramatic and long awaited events in. Elias Vaughn does not get to do much, and his experience of the Benny Russell vision is dull and drags on too long.
Having had to wait for ages, with the book being delayed by Perry's pregnancy, i guess i had too many expectations, but i cannot help feeling that Avatar and Rising Son were far superior. There are just too many storylines to resolve (Kasidy's pregnancy, the parasites, the religious upheaval, the Emissary, Jake returning with Kai Opaka, the Cardassians, Bajor entering the Federation, Ro and Quark, Ensign Shar, Vaughn and Prynn, plus new subplots of the O'Brians). Still, if you have read the previous books you'd be mad not to get this one! If you haven't read the previous books, then definitely get ALL of them as they are worth every penny; you'd need to read them first before Unity, although this book has a long summary of all the events after the television finale.
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2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars DS9 - Unity, 13 Jan 2004
I was really disappointed in this book, im only half way through and im bored already. After Avatar and the Mission Gamma Series, i was expecting a blast. The plot is not really interesting, was better with Kira on the USS Gryphon in a earlier book, this is just a boring continuation, find the parasite - how thrilling.....not. I love Star Trek and the books but this one is just like one bad episode. If your going to buy it, wait till paperback, not worth the money!
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1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Boring, 15 Aug 2005
By A Customer
This review is from: Unity (Star Trek: Deep Space Nine) (Mass Market Paperback)
Being a great Star Trek fan I never thought I would enjoy the books, but having read "A Stitch in Time" and several other Star Trek novels I began to enjoy them. But I was very disappointed with "Unity". The story didn't seem to flow, it was all of a piece, and very disjointed, nothing seemed to blend in. I bought the hard cover and started to read it but in the end I was rushing through it just to get it over with. I did find it very boring, but that's only my opinion. Other readers may love it but I have to say I did not like it.
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Unity (Star Trek: Deep Space Nine)
Unity (Star Trek: Deep Space Nine) by S. D. Perry (Mass Market Paperback - 3 Jan 2005)
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