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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Truly, the king.
A book for both fans of professional wrestling, and interesting stories alike, this autobiography touched me like no other.

I cried as I felt him pain of being alone, and heartache from failed relationships.

This book was complete suprise, as it feels personal all the way through.

Well reccommended.
Published on 25 April 2006 by Alix

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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not as good as it could have been
Having previously read some WWF books, namely the Foley and Rock books, i picked up Lawler's book with mixed thoughts. Although very informative, something seems to be missing from this book which was in the others. This book is very personal, it is entirely anecdotal, btu at times it feels a bit like it is rambling. With someone with the comedic character that Lawler...
Published on 20 Jan 2004


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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not as good as it could have been, 20 Jan 2004
By A Customer
Having previously read some WWF books, namely the Foley and Rock books, i picked up Lawler's book with mixed thoughts. Although very informative, something seems to be missing from this book which was in the others. This book is very personal, it is entirely anecdotal, btu at times it feels a bit like it is rambling. With someone with the comedic character that Lawler portrays, there is little evidence of comedy in the book, unlike in Foley and Rock's books. The book is emotional, it goes into some depths about Lawler's personal life, including hsi heartbreak at the split with his third wife, former WWF diva Stacey "The Kat" Carter.
Lawler is a contoversial character, who has been around for a very long time, but with some of the better stories, such as how he came to sue Vince McMahon, his storylines with Bret Hart, and how he felt about the death of Owen Hart, which he saw mere feet in front of him, seemd to be skipped through very quickly. Lawler does not speak much about present day WWE wrestling in much depth at all, instead he tells us at great length about his foundations in wrestling, which is fair enough, but i felt it would have been better to speak a little more on the present day as well.
Anyway, overall, although i enjoyed the book, i felt a little let-down by it and thought i deserved a bit more. Well worth picking up, but get your hopes up.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Truly, the king., 25 April 2006
By 
Alix (Manchester) - See all my reviews
A book for both fans of professional wrestling, and interesting stories alike, this autobiography touched me like no other.

I cried as I felt him pain of being alone, and heartache from failed relationships.

This book was complete suprise, as it feels personal all the way through.

Well reccommended.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Truly The King, 14 Jan 2012
By 
A. Weild - See all my reviews
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This review is from: It's Good to be the King...: Sometimes (Hardcover)
Wrestling autobiographies are usually ten-a-penny. You know the sort, a guy who's been a star for 5 years or so writes a book concentrating on every big match he's had with a few road stories thrown in for good measure. Now, I've read a lot of these books and after a while, they all seem to be rather generic (especially the ones published by the WWE). This one is different because it focuses on a guy (Jerry Lawler) who made his name away from Vince McMahon's global company. For those who only know Lawler from his time in the WWE, you've missed out on a very colourful career. This book helps in painting a portrait of a guy who was, at one time, more `over' (popular) than the likes of Ric Flair and a (pre-1985) Hulk Hogan.

First off the bat, there's a couple of things you need know about Jerry's autobiography: firstly, he doesn't spend too much time talking about his tenure with the WWE. When you think of it, that's understandable considering he spent over 20 years of his in-ring career outside the WWE. All that's covered in detail is how Vince fired Stacey (Lawler's 3rd wife and WWE Diva) which led to Jerry quitting in protest; his relationship with Jim Ross & Vince McMahon; and a brief page about getting heat from some WWE superstars that once worked for him in Memphis.

Quite simply, Jerry Lawler was more than a wrestler. During his career, Lawler found fame also as an accomplished artist, a TV personality, a radio DJ, a recording artist and as a short-time political campaigner amongst other things. In fact, he was so famous, when he wrote that he was more popular in Memphis than Elvis in 1975-77, Lawler wasn't joking (although he does admit Elvis' career had sunk to rock bottom by then).

It's only natural that Jerry spends a lot of time writing about Jackie Fargo, an already established wrestling star and the biggest name on the scene in Memphis by the time Lawler finally made his debut in 1970. Fargo, as you'll discover, was more than just his trainer. He was his mentor and a father figure who ended up being one of Jerry's closest life-long friends. Others who played an important part in his career are also featured in great length. Lance Russell (the voice of Memphis wrestling), Jerry Jarrett (booker, co-owner of the CWA/USWA and business associate of Lawler's), Bill Apter (the world-renowned wrestling journalist), Sam Bass (a close friend of Lawler's who was killed in a car crash), Nick Gulas (who Jerry worked for at the beginning of his career) and several soon-to-be top wrestlers who went on to bigger things with the WWE and WCW.

The most interesting part of this book is Lawler's involvement with Andy Kaufman. Kaufman, who was a big comedy star in the 80s, was a huge wrestling fan and wanted to get involved in the sport. Lawler saw the opportunity to take their feud mainstream (something that had never been done before) and it became bigger than even Jerry Lawler could've imagined. The part describing their worked (fake) fight on the David Letterman Show is particularly funny. Even Vince McMahon's WWWF (as it was then known) wasn't getting that much publicity.

Of course, there's many `road' stories in the book too. Some work as bridges between one story and the next, but some don't. I guess Jerry thought these insider tales would be understood by the readers. There are several omissions from Lawler's career (both inside and outside the ring) that aren't covered in his autobiography. In an early chapter, he makes reference to Owen Hart's tragic death in 1999 and writes that he'll discuss it in a later chapter. He doesn't, except for reiterating it was "the worst moment of my career" (sic). Jerry also talks about various legal battles he's went through in his life but fails to mention when he was falsely accused of raping an under-age girl in 1993. No mention is made of Lawler's involvement with ECW which led to the birth of the `Attitude' Era (the most profitable time in WWE history). And his relationship with his mother, which he is said to have adored, is never mentioned.

If his break-up with Stacey `Kat' Carter hadn't happened so soon to Jerry writing this book, I doubt he'd have spent as long as he did discussing it. But he goes into great detail about the separation (maybe too much detail). I feel quite indifferent to the whole situation to be honest. A part of me felt sorry for Jerry when he discovered Stacey had been cheating on him and you can `feel' his pain when he describes how he felt when she told him she no longer loved him and they separated. However, what Stacey done to Jerry was what Jerry had himself done to his first and second wives (Kay and Paula). In fact, when talking about cheating on Kay with Paula then cheating on Paula with Stacey, there are times when Jerry makes light of the situation. So it is kind of hard to feel sorry for the guy.

There are parts of the book which are unnecessary. Lawler's love of "puppies" is a running theme throughout the book, and he even spends a page fantasizing which WWE Diva (in 2002) he would like to have sex with but never did. The anecdote about what he did with two `ring rats' in the back seat of a limousine seems to have been more for his pleasure than the reader's. I also found his tales of finding a replacement for Stacey to be quite creepy: a 52 year old guy going on the internet to find a "young girl" (sic) between late-teens and mid 20s to be his wrestling valet and `more' (sic) just made Lawler come across as a 'dirty old man'.

In closing, I found this book to be a very enjoyable read. As someone who first started watching the WWE in 1990, it's fascinating to read how the old territory system worked at a time when the USA was awash with wrestling companies and not one company (sans maybe JCP) ruled supreme. Jerry had an illustrious career. This book is testament to that.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A King Of Books For "The King" (Part One), 12 Jun 2003
This review is from: It's Good to be the King...: Sometimes (Hardcover)
I am a major wrestling fan and I have alread read bboks by The Rock and Mick Foley when I saw on WWE.Com that Jerry "The King" Lawler had a book out I had to get it. I recived the book and in just over a day got half way through it. Jerry Lawler's tale of his wrestling career is very interesting and is told in a entertaining way. Every aspect of his life is told in "Its Good To Be King... Sometimes" The best part of the book so far for me is when he goes in to great details about his legendary "Fued" with Taxi actor Andy Kaufman (also of Saturday Night Live Fame). He explains that the fans all thouhgt it was real and how only until a few years ago, only a select group knew it was a "Work" (a wrestling term in the book). Jerry Lawler is as entertaining in this book as he is on WWE Raw. His stories have kept me glued to it.
When I Finish the book I will tell you again how good it is
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Its Good To Be King Sometimes.... THE BOOK WAS GREAT!, 20 Jun 2003
This review is from: It's Good to be the King...: Sometimes (Hardcover)
This book is fantastic. As a fan of the WWE and all of its books, Chyna, The Rock & (of course) Mick Foley. I decided that this book is a must buy. I recived the book on a Wednesday and by the Sunday I had finished it. Jerry Lawler explains how he loved to watch wrestling with his father but never thought about becoming a wreslter. For me there wasnt enough WWE (WWF) stories but all his tales from Memphis and his wifes amde up for that. The way Lawler wrote about his heart ache when Stacey Carter (Miss Kitty) left him really made me weep for him. He has left no stone un turned in this magnificent book. I gove it 10 stars let allone five.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A enjoying read, 30 Jan 2003
By 
Mr. Damian J. McGrath (Bristol, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: It's Good to be the King...: Sometimes (Hardcover)
I bought this book because I am a huge fan of The King, and really enjoy his commentary on TV, and mainly because I wanted the truth behind many of the news stories about him. This book covers every major event in his life, and, where possible, it goes into a lot of depth. He brushes lightly over his infamous court case, which is understandable, and could possibly be for legal reasons, but everything else is insightful and enjoyable to read. I would have preferred more stories about his time in the WWE (or WWF), as the book semmed to focus on his time in Memphis a lot, but this isnt a big concern as his Memphis exploits are very funny and enjoyable. His tales about the many women in his life is fun to read, and many of the characters he talks about are famous characters, so it is easy to understand and follow the book through. It isnt a classic like the 2 Foley books, but is a very good read, and will while away a rainy Sunday afternoon.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars It's Truly Good To Be The King, 16 Mar 2003
This review is from: It's Good to be the King...: Sometimes (Hardcover)
When thinking of whether to buy this book or not you've got to ask yourself a question - do you enjoy Jerry Lawler's comedy turns on Raw every week? If the answer is yes, then get the book. The one-liners fly thick and fast as is to be expected.
If you know The King simply from WWE then you may be disappointed as the book discusses his Memphis days more than his current employers, although he goes into suprisingly candid detail about the women in his life, especially his sometimes troublesome relationship with Stacey Carter (Miss Kitty).
Overall a pretty funny book which is definitely worth a read.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars its good to read this book ...............all the time, 16 Oct 2004
I loved this book. Once I heard that the king had a book coming out, I went to the shop on the day it came out and got a one and it lived up to all of my expectations. the king talks about his life as a kid, starting wrestling , how he became the king and what it is like working with good ol J.R Jim Ross.
This book made me laugh out loud his jokes come out of no were but they add a good touch
All in all if you're a king fan or a wwe fan or both buy this book it is great
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Soooooo Boooooring, 29 Aug 2011
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This review is from: It's Good to be the King...: Sometimes (Hardcover)
A very booring read. Jerry could have covered so many different aspects of his life/wrestlng career. Instead he spent several chapters talking about art and his divorce from the Kat. if you haven't already read them buy the following wrestler autobiographies instaed: Hitman: My Real Life in the Cartoon World of Wrestling Ted DiBiase: The Million Dollar Man (WWE) To be the Man (WWE) Undisputed: How to Become World Champion in 1,372 Easy Steps A Lion's Tale: Around the World in Spandex
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1 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars the king? or not, 19 Feb 2003
This review is from: It's Good to be the King...: Sometimes (Hardcover)
i bought this book because i have followed the career of the king. i expected it to be laugh out loud funny as are his totaly non-biased commentaries :-) it made me laugh out loud twice, so i was disappointed, it does go into his career in the earleir days and his trials on the road
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It's Good to be the King...: Sometimes
It's Good to be the King...: Sometimes by Jerry Lawler (Hardcover - 6 Jan 2003)
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