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46 Reviews
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30 of 30 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Up the Ox and Bucks.
This is the story of the Ox and Bucks regiment who captured Pegasus bridge on D-Day. This book is superb and gives an excellent account of the importance of the mission and the training of the men leading up to the actual assault and capture of the bridge. It then goes on to explain how the bridge was held and includes good detail of when the re-enforcements arrived. This...
Published on 21 Aug. 2005 by Stephen. W

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Worth a read but not exceptional
I had meant to read 'Pegasus Bridge' for some time and, having seen a copy in my local library, decided to do so. Ambrose presents an interesting description of the taking of the Bridge and, perhaps more importantly, the build up to the mission. In particular, John Howard's single-minded attention to the training of his troops is well described and his efforts, of...
Published 16 months ago by IstanbulPricey


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4.0 out of 5 stars Humbling and moving, 8 Jan. 2013
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This review is from: Pegasus Bridge: D-Day - the Daring British Airborne Raid (Paperback)
Like 'Crazy Horse and Custer', the other book by the late Stephen Ambrose that I have read, this is well paced and described, with vivid portraits of the individuals. The story of Major John Howard and D Company the 2nd Ox and Bucks is of course well known, and this book does them justice, whilst never ignoring the German perspective. The book makes no real attempt to place this story within the history of the wider D-Day campaign, but is no worse for that. I read the book in just a couple of days over the Christmas holidays, and was left feeling pretty humbled by the bravery, suffering and sacrifice of the generation that produced these men.
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4.0 out of 5 stars An amazing, daring raid, 17 May 2009
By 
E. H. (England) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Pegasus Bridge: D-Day - the Daring British Airborne Raid (Paperback)
This book tells the story of an incredible mission carried out by the British Airbourne which if failed the outcome of D-Day may have been very different. I was glad to read of the rising popularity of the celebrations that take place at the bridge with the crowds growing all the time. There are many people who should be remembered and in this there are a handful of them. I thought Ambrose could have added more detail and built up just how dangerous and vital the mission was going to be. For that reason i gave it 4 stars, other than that its a great read.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The true story of this vital bridge on D-Day, 20 Feb. 2011
By 
R. JOHNSON (London, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Pegasus Bridge: D-Day - the Daring British Airborne Raid (Paperback)
Particularly since the film Saving Private Ryan, much of the focus of interest in D-Day has been on the beaches themselves, most notably Omaha. However, to their left flank and slightly inland, the story of this bridge, it's crucial role in the success of D-Day and the narrow margin of allied success has never been fully appreciated.

First hand accounts provide the definitive story of unfolding events and the desperate struggle to prevent German forces retaking this crucial pathway to the beaches beyond.
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5.0 out of 5 stars This book is brilliant. After reading Ambrose's Band of Brothers, 22 Sept. 2014
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This review is from: Pegasus Bridge: D-Day - the Daring British Airborne Raid (Paperback)
This book is brilliant. After reading Ambrose's Band of Brothers, I was keen to read about some of the British exploits during the war. I like Ambrose's style of writing and this book brings the same factual presentation to Pegasus Bridge raids as he does with his other books. Overall a gripping read which I found really makes you appreciate what these went through; the lack of sleep, the rigorous training and the death and mayhem on a day to day basis. Definitely worth a read.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Pegasus bridge, 24 Jan. 2003
By 
GamerGuru (Yorkshire, England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Pegasus Bridge: D-Day - the Daring British Airborne Raid (Paperback)
This book is a truly good read, it tells you about the men who went on this daring mission, right from their training in England, up to minute by minute action at Pegasus bridge. Includes photos, interveiws,some funny bits and down right exciting moments.
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5.0 out of 5 stars We should all remeber these heroes,,,,, 1 Oct. 2009
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Mr. S. James "jamesst" (london) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Pegasus Bridge: D-Day - the Daring British Airborne Raid (Paperback)
After visiting Pegasus bridge in the summer I thought I had to read about what exactly happened there 60 years back, this book hit the spot exactly! Well written with first hand reporst from both sides it enthralled from beginning to end.
The continuation past the end of WW2 was a good ending too, all in all I'd recommend this to anyone, I'd also recommend visiting this historic area too!
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4.0 out of 5 stars All you need to know?, 6 Nov. 2013
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This review is from: Pegasus Bridge: D-Day - the Daring British Airborne Raid (Paperback)
A very, very good read, but I felt that something was missing. Could one of the greatest missions of all time be summed up in so few pages? Of course not. I know I am in for a little disappointment when I have to start researching an event before finishing the book. This book should have, and could have done more. Not in a specific area, but everywhere.
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5.0 out of 5 stars hero's, 24 Aug. 2010
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This review is from: Pegasus Bridge: D-Day - the Daring British Airborne Raid (Paperback)
this book goes through the whole sequence of what it took to plan and execute this daring raid and in a way that its totally absorbing. from the first time the author met major john howard, back to the selection and training to the raid itself and the less than over-use of the talents of a superior outfit , a waste of a supherb fighting unit
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Good Start But Limited Detail on the Defense of the Bridges on D-day, 20 April 2012
By 
JH "hobbs_tx" (Houston, TX United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Pegasus Bridge: D-Day - the Daring British Airborne Raid (Paperback)
First let me start off by saying I loved Band of Brothers Us Tie in: E Company, 506th Regiment, 101st Airborne : from Normandy to Hitler's Eagle's Nest, also by Ambrose. I liked how Pegasus Bridge starts out and was getting the feeling this would be another great book. However, I found Ambrose's telling of the battle for Pegasus Bridge quite anticlimactic. The fight to take the bridge is over before it begins. Ambrose talks about fighting occurring frequently in defense of the bridge, but rarely provides details. More often than not the anecdotes provide more comic relief than a compelling story. The exception is Sergeant Thornton taking out the tank to halt an early German counterattack. Soon after this Company D goes into reserve while the 7th Battalion takes over the defense. Even when some of Company D troops go into the front no details are provided. I was expecting a lot more detail from a book that is purported to be about a single two day battle. The impression that I get from reading Ambrose's account is that taking the bridge was easy and, other than the one perfect shot by Sergeant Thornton, Company D is relieved by the 7th Battalion before all the real fighting gets started.

After Company D leaves the bridge to rejoin its regiment, the story goes downhill. This part of the story seems detached and aimless. I think Ambrose would have been better served concentrating more on the fight at the bridges and enlarging his scope to provide more coverage of the 7th Battalion defense against the counterattacks. The Battle for Pegasus Bridge shouldn't be just a story of Company D. Ambrose really relies on too few sources to make the story complete. If he wanted to write a company history he should have changed the title.

What I really did not enjoy was several references to Company D men being irritated by being put back into the line after they were initially relieved at the bridge. Especially when they were being asked to come up and support 7th Battalion paratroopers, who were getting hit with the full face of the counterattack. Again later Ambrose tells us they felt they should be returned back to England for refitting and preparing for the next bridge assault instead of fighting with the rest of the troops. I'm sure the other troops in the line wouldn't have felt much sympathy for them. Another part that should have been scratched was the suggestion that there not being a coup de main assault in Operation Market Garden because D company was not available to do it. Simply ridiculous. Ambrose makes it seem that D Company was the only highly trained unit in the British airborne. I hope Ambrose has embellished the story on his own or taken these parts out of context.

But, it isn't all bad. Pegasus Bridge is still an easy read with many amusing anecdotes and you will gain an understanding of what occurred at Pegasus Bridge and why it was successful. He does provide some accounts from German sources which add tremendously to the story. The book does contain a good sketch showing the area around the bridges and several good photographs. It also includes Major Howard's actual orders. Some details about the amazing accuracy of the British intelligence are provided. Perhaps they should have given some pointers to their American colleagues who didn't even know until D-Day that the 352nd division had been moved up to the coast near Omaha three month before the invasion. Overall I would not recommend this book. I found Pegasus Bridge fails to deliver fully on its title and left me wondering where the rest was.
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5.0 out of 5 stars so it is good to be reminded of the grim cost of war, 11 July 2014
By 
Paul Bell (Isle of Wight) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Pegasus Bridge: D-Day - the Daring British Airborne Raid (Paperback)
D-Day is a vague memory. I was 9 years old at the time, so it is good to be reminded of the grim cost of war. I have visited Pegasus Bridge and the sheer skill of the glider pilots to get three heavily laden gliders on to such a restricted area is breathtaking.
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Pegasus Bridge: D-Day - the Daring British Airborne Raid
Pegasus Bridge: D-Day - the Daring British Airborne Raid by Stephen E. Ambrose (Paperback - 4 Nov. 2002)
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