Customer Reviews


10 Reviews
5 star:
 (6)
4 star:
 (2)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A fantastic view from the other side. Outstanding.
We sometimes forget that layer upon layer of patently false propaganda was created by the U.S. Government during World War II for consuption by the American population. This book cuts through these layers to reveal men, fighter pilots, not unlike the Americans they faced in many ways. This book gives the reader an understanding of what life what like for Sakai and his...
Published on 7 Dec. 1997

versus
2.0 out of 5 stars Could do better
I have read this as a paperback so wanted to reread it as I enjoyed it. I haven't finished it but am disappointed at the numbers of typos e.g. filters for fighters and worships for warships. 2 passages are repeated twice.
Published 5 months ago by S. Newton


Most Helpful First | Newest First

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A fantastic view from the other side. Outstanding., 7 Dec. 1997
By A Customer
We sometimes forget that layer upon layer of patently false propaganda was created by the U.S. Government during World War II for consuption by the American population. This book cuts through these layers to reveal men, fighter pilots, not unlike the Americans they faced in many ways. This book gives the reader an understanding of what life what like for Sakai and his fellow pilots and helps explain mistakes made by the Japanese high command concerning pilot training and aircraft development. Mistakes which may have shortened the war and certainly saved many American lives. Sakai, who grew up poor but of a Samurai family (hence the title "Samurai"), while revealing the failures of the Japanese high command also gives an insight into the "Bushido" ("Warrior's Way") which debunks many of the myths which have sprung up about it. Even after losing an eye, Sakai continued to fly in combat and was invited to join the Japanese Self-Defense Force following the war (he declined). I recommend this book to anyone who truly studies World War II or is interested in aerial combat.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A book which is both exciting and moving, 31 Jan. 2001
This review is from: Samurai! (Military History (Ibooks)) (Paperback)
Saburo Sakai died in September 2000, but his memory will live on through this stirring and unforgettable account of his wartime exploits. Trained to an incredibly high degree by an unforgiving and perfectionist system which rejected more than half of the candidates who sought to become fighter pilots, Sakai and his comrades cut a swathe through the ill-prepared opposition facing them at the start of The Pacific War. Yet, the tide turned against Japan and most of its great pilots were lost in doomed battles. Sakai's story takes in both the epic sweep of this contest between nations in the vast arena of the Pacific and the more intimate, personal experiences which marked his life.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Fighter Pilot!, 5 Dec. 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Samurai! (Paperback)
I have been reading first-hand memoirs of veterans of WWII and this particular book is a great and readable example. I bought the paperback in Singapore airport and read it easily on a flight to Sydney.
The author was a decorated Japanese fighter pilot in WWII and this memoir outlines his rigorous training regime, details various campaigns, and articulates his experience of air combat over the Pacific in great and sometimes grisly detail.
This book offers perspective on the Japanese martial spirit and is itself a rare story given the scant likelihood of survival of Japanese pilots by the end of the war. If you have read Geoffrey Wellum's recent book First Light or Richard Hillary's Last Enemy - both about the RAF, you should find Sasai's account of his battles in the Pacifica at the same time equally compelling.
Microsoft's Combat Sim 2 allows one to re-create, amongst other things, some of Sasai's missions detailed in this book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Into The Mind Of A Great Japanese Air Ace, 2 Mar. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I first read this great book many years ago in the 1970's. I'd read many German Aviator accounts of the Second World War, but this was the first Japanese account that i'd read and it gave a much better idea of just why the very professional Japanese Airforce ran rampant over Asian and Pacific skies in their Zeros for so long. His dogfighting descriptions are wonderful and cover some very important historical events. Many of his opponents were brave too even though they were fighting with inferior aeroplanes for long periods early on in the war. Eventually the loss of so many experienced pilots (especially at Midway) and the increasing skill and better aeroplanes of the Allies took it's toll on the Japanes Airforce and they were fighting a losing battle from late 1942 onwards. A wonderful book. Buy it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars The true war history of the best Japanese Ace, 5 April 2013
This review is from: Samurai! (Military History (Ibooks)) (Paperback)
Saburo Sakai shot down 64 enemy airplanes during WWII and so he had been the best Japanese ace of the war.
He was born on 26th august 1916, he came from the countryside but from a family with samurai's heritage, on 1933 he joined the navy becoming a pilot, he began fighting against the Chinese on 1938, he partecipated to a lot of missions in the Pacific , ending the war flying against the american bombers.
The book is moving because it shows you the real soul and the real feelings of a Japanese pilot, as when he survived to his mission kamikaze.
For sure one of the best book of this genre.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting, 15 Sept. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Samurai! (Military History (Ibooks)) (Paperback)
A really interesting book that allows to feel the actual taste of what was a Samurai and a Zero fighter during the WWII. You can have a quick overview over the japanese pre-war imperial society too. And, reading between the lines, you can also understand the reason (at least one of the several ones) why the lose at Midway meant for Japan a defeat bigger than it actually appeared.
Just one complain: the printing quality is very bad, it looks like an old mimeograph, a sort of copy of a copy of a copy, not a modern and clean print. Quite annoying to read.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating Story of a Japanese Fighter Ace, 26 Aug. 1998
By A Customer
This book is a must for any history buff or anyone interested in what the "other side" of World War II was like. This work chronicles the career of Saburo Sakai and his many air battles throughout World War II. His words debunk many myths about Japanese pilots (he even admits to turning back from a suicide mission) and gives one a personal feel to the historical events that unfolded around him. One can also plot the technological climb of aircraft as Sakai describes how adversaries steadily got better and better. This book would even be good reading for "peaceniks" who think development of new aircraft and weapons are a waste of money. They will see through Sakai's work how one superior fighter plane (the Zero) was able to command the skies in the Pacific war for several years until better aircraft were turned out by the U.S. In the future, the U.S. may not be so lucky. This is a superior book and is one of the best written about World War II.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2.0 out of 5 stars Could do better, 19 Nov. 2014
By 
S. Newton (Essex UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I have read this as a paperback so wanted to reread it as I enjoyed it. I haven't finished it but am disappointed at the numbers of typos e.g. filters for fighters and worships for warships. 2 passages are repeated twice.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best books I have read, 17 Mar. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Samurai! (Military History (Ibooks)) (Paperback)
Have been looking for this book for a long time - was not dissapointed,best read. Will definately follow up on the other works by this author
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars Three Stars, 30 Oct. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Samurai! (Military History (Ibooks)) (Paperback)
Hard going in places
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Samurai! (Military History (Ibooks))
Samurai! (Military History (Ibooks)) by Martin With Caidin (Paperback - 27 July 2011)
£9.30
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews