Customer Reviews


21 Reviews
5 star:
 (11)
4 star:
 (7)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


27 of 28 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Description of the Advantages of Forming Trust, the Psychology of Trust, and How to Build Trust
Trust can make things easier, and distrust can definitely make things much harder. You already know that. But do you know how to check out where you need to change in order to create more beneficial trust? The Speed of Trust can help those who need a template for such self-examination.

Mr. Stephen M. R. Covey is the son of Dr. Stephen R. Covey of 7 Habits of...
Published on 22 Nov 2007 by Donald Mitchell

versus
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Solid content just far too dragged out
As far as what the book is trying to say it is pretty solid. The book however is about 100 pages too long. Cut down the huge intro and streamline the examples and take out all the unnecessary repetition.
Published on 1 Feb 2009 by Andrew Hale


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

27 of 28 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Description of the Advantages of Forming Trust, the Psychology of Trust, and How to Build Trust, 22 Nov 2007
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: The Speed of Trust: The One Thing That Changes Everything (Paperback)
Trust can make things easier, and distrust can definitely make things much harder. You already know that. But do you know how to check out where you need to change in order to create more beneficial trust? The Speed of Trust can help those who need a template for such self-examination.

Mr. Stephen M. R. Covey is the son of Dr. Stephen R. Covey of 7 Habits of Highly Effective People fame. If you've read that famous book, you may remember young Stephen referred to by his father as the seven-year-old son who was asked to keep the yard "clean and green" and did neither at first. Dr. Covey writes the foreword for this book and refers to that example. Ms. Rebecca Merrill helped with the writing of Dr. Stephen R. Covey's book First Things First which was coauthored by Roger Merrill.

Trust is expressed by a paradigm that includes five waves of trust (self trust based on the principle of credibility, relationship trust based on the principle of proper behavior, organizational trust based on the principle of alignment, market trust based on the principle of reputation, and societal trust based on the principle of contribution). Most of the book is taken up with examining those five waves and their underlying principles. The core of the book comes, however, in the 13 behaviors that establish trust (talk straight, demonstrate respect, create transparency, right wrongs, show loyalty, get better, confront reality, clarify expectations, practice accountability, listen first, keep commitments, and extend trust). Each section of the book comes with ways to check on your performance and to create plans for improvement.

This book is by far the best development of the subject of creating and restoring trust that I have read. That makes the book an essential reference. I congratulate and appreciate the authors for tackling this important subject.

I would be remiss, however, in being a trustworthy reviewer if I didn't point out some weaknesses in the approach:

1. Some of the examples of trust and mistrust drawn from Mr. Covey's experiences aren't terribly satisfying to read. Perhaps the most jarring example is one of the early ones in the book that describes the distrust that the Franklin Quest people felt toward him after the company merged with Covey Leadership Center. Mr. Covey comes across as unbelievably naive for not having taken into account how the two cultures should mesh (if at all) in engineering the merger. That's a more fundamental lesson than the lack of trust point. In addition, he doesn't seem to realize that merely being the son of the company's founder would make many people who didn't know him skeptical of his qualifications and his talent. Having read about how naive Mr. Covey was in this situation undercut my confidence in his ability to address the subject of trust. But I did appreciate his willingness to share such a painful experience in his book.

2. Most of the examples that are cited that do not involve Mr. Covey's direct experience are very overused. They same examples have been used to prove excellence in many other dimensions. As a result, the book doesn't come alive as much as it might. The examples conjure up memories of other books and arguments rather than cleanly bringing across the authors' trust-related points.

3. The book's structure and style are pretty pedantic, but without the precision that an academic would bring to the subject. In most areas, the authors rely on your sense of what's right rather than giving you clear lines of what to do and what not to do. That's fine if you already have a well-defined sense of how trust is formed and re-established. But if you don't know the answers already because you haven't lived in that kind of an environment, the book will leave you with too little direction.

4. Ultimately, long sections of the book are very general and boring. The major exceptions are the examples drawn from Mr. Covey's own family. I found those examples to be fresh and interesting.

After you finish this book, I suggest that you think about those who have gained your trust and distrust. What did they do? Examining those personal examples will add a lot of depth to the general ideas presented here.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Solid content just far too dragged out, 1 Feb 2009
By 
Andrew Hale (Helsinki Finland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Speed of Trust: The One Thing That Changes Everything (Paperback)
As far as what the book is trying to say it is pretty solid. The book however is about 100 pages too long. Cut down the huge intro and streamline the examples and take out all the unnecessary repetition.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


19 of 22 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Description of the Advantages of Forming Trust, the Psychology of Trust, and How to Build Trust, 22 Nov 2007
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: The Speed of Trust (Hardcover)
Trust can make things easier, and distrust can definitely make things much harder. You already know that. But do you know how to check out where you need to change in order to create more beneficial trust? The Speed of Trust can help those who need a template for such self-examination.

Mr. Stephen M. R. Covey is the son of Dr. Stephen R. Covey of 7 Habits of Highly Effective People fame. If you've read that famous book, you may remember young Stephen referred to by his father as the seven-year-old son who was asked to keep the yard "clean and green" and did neither at first. Dr. Covey writes the foreword for this book and refers to that example. Ms. Rebecca Merrill helped with the writing of Dr. Stephen R. Covey's book First Things First which was coauthored by Roger Merrill.

Trust is expressed by a paradigm that includes five waves of trust (self trust based on the principle of credibility, relationship trust based on the principle of proper behavior, organizational trust based on the principle of alignment, market trust based on the principle of reputation, and societal trust based on the principle of contribution). Most of the book is taken up with examining those five waves and their underlying principles. The core of the book comes, however, in the 13 behaviors that establish trust (talk straight, demonstrate respect, create transparency, right wrongs, show loyalty, get better, confront reality, clarify expectations, practice accountability, listen first, keep commitments, and extend trust). Each section of the book comes with ways to check on your performance and to create plans for improvement.

This book is by far the best development of the subject of creating and restoring trust that I have read. That makes the book an essential reference. I congratulate and appreciate the authors for tackling this important subject.

I would be remiss, however, in being a trustworthy reviewer if I didn't point out some weaknesses in the approach:

1. Some of the examples of trust and mistrust drawn from Mr. Covey's experiences aren't terribly satisfying to read. Perhaps the most jarring example is one of the early ones in the book that describes the distrust that the Franklin Quest people felt toward him after the company merged with Covey Leadership Center. Mr. Covey comes across as unbelievably naive for not having taken into account how the two cultures should mesh (if at all) in engineering the merger. That's a more fundamental lesson than the lack of trust point. In addition, he doesn't seem to realize that merely being the son of the company's founder would make many people who didn't know him skeptical of his qualifications and his talent. Having read about how naive Mr. Covey was in this situation undercut my confidence in his ability to address the subject of trust. But I did appreciate his willingness to share such a painful experience in his book.

2. Most of the examples that are cited that do not involve Mr. Covey's direct experience are very overused. They same examples have been used to prove excellence in many other dimensions. As a result, the book doesn't come alive as much as it might. The examples conjure up memories of other books and arguments rather than cleanly bringing across the authors' trust-related points.

3. The book's structure and style are pretty pedantic, but without the precision that an academic would bring to the subject. In most areas, the authors rely on your sense of what's right rather than giving you clear lines of what to do and what not to do. That's fine if you already have a well-defined sense of how trust is formed and re-established. But if you don't know the answers already because you haven't lived in that kind of an environment, the book will leave you with too little direction.

4. Ultimately, long sections of the book are very general and boring. The major exceptions are the examples drawn from Mr. Covey's own family. I found those examples to be fresh and interesting.

After you finish this book, I suggest that you think about those who have gained your trust and distrust. What did they do? Examining those personal examples will add a lot of depth to the general ideas presented here.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


17 of 20 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Trust?, 23 Sep 2007
By 
F. Wijsenbeek (London, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Speed of Trust: The One Thing That Changes Everything (Paperback)
For someone advocating trust, Stephen M.R. Covey seems to rely far too much on unsuspecting business travellers picking up his book (which has been made to look substantially like those of Stephen R. Covey, his father) under the assumption that they are buying a book written by Stephen R. Covey. Stephen M.R. Covey's book is unfortunately uninspiring.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Getting real and keeping it right. 101 for success., 18 April 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Stephen Covey is an easy read but at the same time is deeply thought provoking. His examples are succinct and eminently understandable regardless of the level the reader.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars If only!, 14 April 2011
By 
Great book, great message. If only we were living in a world where everyone played the game. Things would be so much better. Incredibly better! This book shows how and why we should, and how we can, in our own environment. Helps us all to shape up and see the massive advantages in being trustworthy. The writer reminds those of us who already are, to continue, and those who are not to wake up to the negative effects mistrust is having in every area of their lives and the significant benefits for being dependable and trustworthy. The one thing that changes everything? A bold claim but I would have to agree.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Timely food for thought, 2 May 2009
By 
Lilian Thornstrom (Earley, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Speed of Trust: The One Thing That Changes Everything (Paperback)
This book is timely for whatever period it is read. Currently with the credit crunch crisis and the on-going political fiascos plaguing the UK government, there is a need to get back to the basics and review what is Trust and how can that Trust can be rebuilt. It should be recommended text book for those in the seats of responsibility.

On a personal level, it is food for thought - although we all want to be credible and trustworthy, we dont always behave in ways that allows this to come through. A worthy read.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Some gems, some definite bits of coal (or worse!), 11 July 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Have puzzled over how many stars to give this book. On the one hand it is lazily written, doesn't reference sources properly and relies too heavily (way too heavily) on the author's own limited personal experience. On the other - well there are one or two really powerful concepts I have used with my team to good effect.

I think there is a great deal of difference between the US and Europe when it comes to business. Some of the examples he gives of US business practice would probably see that person sidelined or fired in my experience in the UK. So it feels as though there is less inherent trust in the US. However, the sections based on exploring the difference between behavioural trust and competence trust are useful ("I trust my wife - but I wouldn't trust her to take my appendix out as she's not a surgeon")
The writing style is hard work and self congratulatory - probably works better in the US. I was personally also appalled by the story of him pouring a jug of water over the head of his nephew because because his team won, and Stephen Covey's team lost. Try re-building trust after that one!
Overall - is insightful if you are a fast reader and you are wiling to invest the time to mine the diamonds.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars a good read, 29 Jun 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
a good read so far and resonates with experiences, mistakes and success in life, highly recommend and I am only part way through
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent book to help realise the value of TRUST, 16 April 2014
By 
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Speed of Trust: The One Thing That Changes Everything (Paperback)
I felt trust is important but did not actually consider how significant it could be. The approach used in this book is just mind blowing. It clearly proves how expensive and time consuming it is if trust is not in the proper level between people!
It also explains how we can actually build and/or repair miss-trusts between people, which that on it's own is just priceless!

ANYONE that is around with people MUST read and practice the teachings of this book. Period.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The Speed of Trust: The One Thing That Changes Everything
The Speed of Trust: The One Thing That Changes Everything by Stephen M. R. Covey (Paperback - 6 Nov 2006)
£10.49
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews