Customer Reviews


35 Reviews
5 star:
 (16)
4 star:
 (12)
3 star:
 (4)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:
 (3)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


32 of 35 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Prophetic and gripping, but slightly dated
This book was written as a prophecy about what the author felt would characterise the C21st. Now that we are nearly a decade into the C21st, we have the ability to look back and see if he was right. If yes, then this book was prophetic and its lessons should be learned. If not, then he is wrong, and the book is little more than an airport novel.

On one or two...
Published on 15 April 2007 by M. McManus

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Mugged by Machiavelli?
Samuel P Huntington's dark classic “The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order”, first published in 1996, comes with positive blurbs from Henry Kissinger and Zbigniew Brzezinski, hardly lightweights on the darker side of things. The 2003 edition spouts a cover showing a Muslim flag alongside the star spangled banner, to boost sales, no doubt...
Published 26 days ago by Ashtar Command


Most Helpful First | Newest First

6 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars dominated by a military perspective ..., 26 July 2005
This review is from: The Clash of Civilizations: And the Remaking of World Order (Paperback)
The analysis, published 1993 by Huntington, has refocused attention after the 9/11 Islamic terrorist attacks - and there seems to be no end: Madrid (3/11/04), bombings in Istanbul (11/20/03) and now in London (7/7/05) or the ritual assassination of Dutch filmmaker and writer Theo van Gogh in Amsterdam (11/2/04). And therefore there is no end of tv-discussions how to react. The foreign policy aide to the US State Department speaks of so-called "fault-line-wars", which exist between the cultures (religions) and will give endlessly smoldering. As examples the hunter Huntington specifies among other things the Gulf War and Afghanistan. The hotspots today are on the fault lines between the religions in Chechnya, the Middle East, Tibet, Sri Lanka, and Bosnia. In Yugoslavia the Serbs where supported by Russian diplomatics while Saudi Arabia, Turkey, Iran and Libya provided arms to the Bosnians. Yugoslavia is an example of what happens to a country where religious factors become the means for identifying oneself. And it could develope worse: Koran-Sura 9, verse 5: "Fight and slay the pagans wherever you find them. And seize them, beleaguer them and lie in wait for them, in every stratagem [of war]." Islam teaches that Muslims must not befriend Jews and Christians. Surat Al-Maidah 5:51 says, "O ye who believe, take not the Jews or the Christians for your friends and protectors. They are but friends and protectors to each other." In the chapter about how to stop those "break-line-wars" Huntington writes: "The force along cultural break lines may stop for a while completely, but it rarely ends really." "These problems become still more complicated, if the cultures involved do not have a core state." Hierarchy-creditor finishing sentence of this important chapter: "A break line war cooks from down highly, a break line peace seeps from above down". We hope, Huntington will know with security, who at the end is "above". Another unsentimental, very tough-minded Huntington analysis: "The conflict can disappear fast and brutally, as a group extinguishes the other one." The fact that cultural difference could brought to coexistence, into an equilibrium, supported by a progressive deliberated secularization of all denominations (accompanied by a sober transformation of all too denomination-linked educating systems) - such trains of thought we unfortunately miss in this provoking sermon, mainly dominated by a military perspective...
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Must reading for the serious student of international affairs, 8 Nov 2006
This review is from: The Clash of Civilizations: And the Remaking of World Order (Paperback)
While there is much (most) of this book I disagree with, it is nonetheless the essential, seminal work on the Clash of Civilizations theory, and thus is must reading for any serious student of international affairs.

In describing his thesis, Huntington elevates "mere" culture to the level of civilization, implying that there are unbridgable fundamental differences between different civilizations which will inevitably lead to a world where these civilizations compete or clash. I don't mean to lazily discredit the idea by association, but this is the philosophy promoted by the likes of Osama bin Laden, for example.

I am afraid reviewers who link this author to the militaristic neo-con movement in the US do not understand either Huntington's thesis or neo-cons themselves. A member of the Western civilization who was an adherent of the Clash of Civilizations worldview would NEVER attack a state of the Islamic civilization, let alone try to turn it into a democracy. Huntington's thesis would predict other nations in the Islamic civilization would rally to the defense of their co-civilizationalist, seeing the attack in terms of an attempt by one civilization to dominate another no matter how justified the attack was (or wasn't, in this case).

Before the war at least, neo-cons argued that all peoples yearn for democracy, that democracy can be delivered at the point of a sword and that it is the mission (burden?) of the West and particularly the lone superpower to liberate these peoples, who will welcome us as their saviors as we create new allies in our own image even while we destroy our enemies. Anyone who suggested that Muslims or Arabs might not be happy to be invaded and brought to democracy was cleverly dismissed as a racist or cultural imperialist. What the neo-cons see as universal civilization Huntington would say is merely Western civilization, and thus any attempt to impose this on another civilization would be doomed to failure.

While Huntington's thesis (first postulated in 1993) would seem to successfully predict the failure of neo-con policy, I think he goes too far in defining characteristics which are "merely" cultural as civilizational. Certainly, there are such things as Islamic and Sinic and Orthodox cultures which one may be wise (and respectful) to consider when dealing with people from those cultures. However, to suggest that these differences are unbridgable is in my view a very limited, deterministic world-view and really an end-game in itself. Individuals can bridge these divisions - what makes "civilizations" composed of individuals any different?

In addition, there are things like universal human rights which exist and have been ratified by nations all over the world. I can not agree with Huntington that these are just expressions of Western thought imposed on the world by the dominant civilization.

Although I find much to oppose in this book, it is very well presented and will certainly be argued about for years to come. You may as well read about the theory straight from the source!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good reading material..., 22 Aug 2002
This review is from: The Clash of Civilizations: And the Remaking of World Order (Paperback)
We might not agree with all its premises - like the classification that was given to Earth’s societies and civilizations, and that different civilizations are at best ambivalent and at worst antagonistic.
The issues are current, and culture does matter a lot, but the scenarios were based on the cold war and on the premise that the Nation State is, was and in the near future will still be the most important player.
The author only accounts for historical, geopolitical, demographic and economical factors (witch is perfectly good for anyone in International Relations), but doesn’t account for sudden changes in technology or for the usual flukes of nature - that deviate events from the “very easy to fit in my grand theory of History”.
This book is thought provoking even if you don’t agree with it, and deals with the fact that the relative power in the world is changing, even if we don’t see it coming.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It was a gift, 23 April 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Clash of Civilizations: And the Remaking of World Order (Paperback)
I haven't read it.

But my wife said that is really good. Exactly what she expected and more.

I need two more words.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating!, 12 Mar 2004
By 
Kurt A. Johnson (Marseilles, IL USA) - See all my reviews
In this highly provocative book, Professor Huntington argues that the world has been moving into a new epoch. In the distant past, civilizations lived apart from each other, with inter-civilizational conflicts being few but of great intensity. Beginning in the 1500s, the West exploded beyond its boundaries, and came to dominate other civilizations. After a period of "Warring States," when Western nations fought each other with other peoples of the globe being used as pawns, the world has been realigning back into civilizational groups.
Although not everyone in the West perceives the new reality, peoples around the globe now begin to see wars between nations of different civilizations as wars involving themselves. Thus, when Muslim fights Christian, the other peoples of the civilizations involved feel themselves drawn in.
This book is quite fascinating, and goes a long way towards explaining much of what can be seen in the recent clash of the West versus Serbia, and America versus Afghanistan. The author explains this new reality, discussing how it came about, what it means now, and what it will mean for the future.
I found this book's grasp of the present course of the world to be breathtaking. Even if you do not believe its view of the world, I would highly recommend that you read a book that has been highly influential on many movers and shakers.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Probably the most important book ive ever read, 17 Feb 2006
This review is from: The Clash of Civilizations: And the Remaking of World Order (Paperback)
I wont bother with any kind of analysis of what Huntington proposes or discusses or how he qualifies his arguments and conclusions as these topics have been well covered in previous reviews. Quite simply this book is one of the most important you will ever read regardless of your status as a layman or professionally/academically involved ( i myself am a student at SOAS ). It is essential for understanding the political climate we live in and (arguably) will continue to live in for decades or longer. Whatever your political leanings or sympathies you cannot read this book without being enlightened and enjoying a geater understanding of the world and current affairs and whether you accept or reject the conclusions reached by Huntington your politics will be greatly strengthened.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


31 of 64 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Madness..., 11 Mar 2006
This review is from: The Clash of Civilizations: And the Remaking of World Order (Paperback)
The opinions expressed by Huntington in this book are quite terrifying. To seriously present such arguments into the academic literature, based on such horrendous generalisations, is a crime. The book is dramaticised, generalized, and extremely subjective. To make claims that 'Muslims' want to do this and 'Christians' want to do that is bad enough, but argue that any disagreement will result in bloodshed is insulting to both religions, and any of the 'civilizations' that Huntington 'identifies'.
In this work Huntington seems not to want to create models, theories or predictions, but to mould reality around his own prejudices. Multiculturalism appears to be dismissed in his work, hypercommunication ignored and the far more empirically based ideas of cosmopiltanism are completely overlooked.
This work is superficial and such thoughts are quite dangerous, if it is influential it is for all the wrong reasons. Useful only as a warning to the world at what happens when people create their theories in cultural vaccumums such as the US administration that Huntington once belonged to. Madness....
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Present and future of the world, 18 Aug 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: The Clash of Civilizations: And the Remaking of World Order (Paperback)
This is one of the most exciting and comprehensive works on present and future of the post-cold-war world. It should be an eye-opener for those considering 'globalisation' and 'westernisation' as the way forward. Lot's of statistical data illustrating statements, overview of relevant literature. Well done!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Must read., 29 Jan 2012
This review is from: The Clash of Civilizations: And the Remaking of World Order (Paperback)
The literature, one must recommend it.
The object itself is as simple as any paperback reading you can find. Small founts, lines extended to as much page as it can find.
As I am studying for my masters degree i have to buy a great deal of books, so it's not my case, but if you can afford a better version, do so. This is as basic as basics can be.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars clash of civilazatiosn, 10 July 2011
This review is from: The Clash of Civilizations: And the Remaking of World Order (Paperback)
I got my order on time and it was in great shape. I was very happy with the purchase and I would recommend to everybaody to buy this book
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First
ARRAY(0xaa8b0e58)

This product

The Clash of Civilizations: And the Remaking of World Order
The Clash of Civilizations: And the Remaking of World Order by Samuel P. Huntington (Paperback - 5 Jun 2002)
6.99
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews