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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Spine-Tingling Thriller! Daniel Silva's Best To Date!
Daniel Silva brings back his enigmatic hero, Gabriel Allon, in "The Confessor," to investigate the mysterious murder of a dear friend, the unpopular aspirations of a newly elected Pope, a secret society in the Vatican, and long hidden secrets from World War II. Allon is a brilliant Israeli art restorer and a complex, melancholy man. He had worked for many years as an...
Published on 19 Feb 2005 by Jana L. Perskie

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3.0 out of 5 stars Neutral Element
"The Confessor" is the third book of the Gabriel Allon series and in my opinion it's the best so far. However, I believe I would've enjoyed it more if I hadn't read "The English Assassin" before.

Someone is assassinated --> Shamron involves Gabriel in the murder case --> it becomes clear that the victim was killed to prevent him from revealing an organization's...
Published 19 months ago by Pedro


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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Spine-Tingling Thriller! Daniel Silva's Best To Date!, 19 Feb 2005
This review is from: The Confessor (Paperback)
Daniel Silva brings back his enigmatic hero, Gabriel Allon, in "The Confessor," to investigate the mysterious murder of a dear friend, the unpopular aspirations of a newly elected Pope, a secret society in the Vatican, and long hidden secrets from World War II. Allon is a brilliant Israeli art restorer and a complex, melancholy man. He had worked for many years as an Israeli intelligence agent and assassin, (when necessary), losing his young son and wife to violence as a consequence of his work. Now he just wants to restore paintings and be left alone with his grief and his guilt.
Allon's boyhood friend and associate, Benjamin Stern, is murdered in his Munich apartment while writing a secret expose on the Church's involvement in the Holocaust. Ari Shamron, Gabriel's old mentor, former head of Israeli intelligence, and the father of Ben Stern, finds Allon in Venice, restoring a Bellini altarpiece. He has little difficulty persuading Allon to accept this assignment to find Stern's killer, even though it means leaving the Bellini, at least temporarily.
Although Allon runs into a stone wall with his investigation in Munich, he begins to discover clues to the secrets of his friend's manuscript. Stern had been writing about material taken from top secret Vatican archives. He also discovered evidence which points to a deadly secret Vatican society, the Crux Vera.
Pope Paul VII, known by his Vatican detractors as "Pope Accidental," has recently been elected to the Papal Throne. He has pledged to review the Church's alleged complicity in the Nazi extermination of the Jews, and make available the Secret Vatican Archives regarding the Holocaust - archives that certain Vatican officials would do anything to keep suppressed. Allon's life, and the Pope's, are in terrible jeopardy.
Whatever your opinion on these controversial issues, Daniel Silva has written his best novel with this mesmerizing tale of Vatican politics, intrigue, murder and World War II history. Mr. Silva's style is reminiscent, but not derivative, of Ken Follett, Frederick Forsyth and John LeCarre. He is definitely in their league and oh, so original, with his 21st century relevant storyline. I have waited for a long time for an author of this caliber to appear and keep me on the edge of my seat, reading through the night. I was unable to put this book down.
JANA
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars OUTSTANDING! Silva's best to date!, 29 July 2005
By 
Rory Morty "Rory Morty" (Giessen, Germany) - See all my reviews
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This book is outstanding. This book is Silva's sixth, and the third in the "Gabriel Allon" series, although it does not deal directly with the Middle East/Palistinian conflict directly, but rather takes an interesting twist and delves into not one, but two, very controversial relationships: between the Catholic Church and the Third Reich, and between the Vatican and the Jews, in particular, the handling of the holocast by the Vatican. Weaving the story in with the manipulation and intrigue for which the Vatican is famous, above all else, makes for a breathtakingly exciting plot, and the usual fasciniating cast of solid and well-developed characters for which Silva is renowned. For readers of The Kill Artist and The English Assassin, it is Gabriel Allon at his best, and the familiar cast of other characters previously introduced, like Ari Shamron, do not dissapoint, although this novel is just as good a read if it is your first Daniel Silva. The reader is taken on a fascinating journey through enchanting parts Venice and Rome, as well as the Italian lake district, amongst other exotic locations. The plot itself is solid and well-researched. I cannot recommend this book highly enough. It is one of very few books for which I have both awarded five stars, and have read more than once! My favourite Daniel Silva novel of them all.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Bring me the file on The Leopard.", 4 Aug 2008
By 
Mary Whipple (New England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Confessor (Paperback)
(4.5 stars) The Leopard, an assassin who figures in a number of Silva novels, becomes a major player in this third Gabriel Allon novel, about the passive involvement of the Vatican in the Holocaust and its subsequent denial of all responsibility. Basing the novel on research by scholars like Susan Zuccotti (whom Silva credits in his acknowledgments) into the secret connections between factions within the Catholic Church and the Third Reich, Silva creates a chilling and utterly compelling story about the reasons that the Vatican might have feared the Jews were a threat to its own power and wanted to prevent the ultimate establishment of an Israeli homeland.

Gabriel Allon, an assassin for the Israeli Mossad (in his secret life) and a talented restorer of paintings and sculptures in Venice, often for the Vatican (in his public life as Mario Delvecchio), is working in Venice when he receives word that Ben Stern, the son of his Israeli mentor Ari Shamron, has been murdered in Munich while researching a book. The subject of his book is so secret that not even his Munich university department head knows what it is. Gabriel leaves Venice for Munich and discovers nothing, though phone records suggest that Ben has been investigating a secret church conference that took place at a convent in Brenzone, Italy, during the Holocaust.

Further investigation brings Allon into contact with members of Crux Vera, an ultra-conservative organization within the church, with their leaders well entrenched in positions of power close to the Pope. These must publicly hide their involvement because the new, liberal Pope Paul VII is anxious for transparency and reconciliation with the Jews. When the Pope decides to attend a meeting with the head of a Rome synagogue to express his regrets for any Vatican failures in responding to the Holocaust, the Crux Vera goes into action, contacting The Leopard to be sure that their involvement is never discovered.

Silva's use of recent historical research to give veracity to his plot and his sensitivity to the various political influences at play create incredible tension. Allon, Shamron, and the supporting characters, many of them Catholic church luminaries, come to life and develop as the action evolves. Allon is a sympathetic protagonist, despite his violent actions to protect the interests of the Israelis, and his sense of honor shines through, even as he kills his enemies with seeming impunity. Ultimately, Silva creates a fascinating historical atmosphere and fills his novel with accurate historical research showing the complicity of some church luminaries to prevent the establishment of a Jewish homeland. Mary Whipple
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars OUTSTANDING! Silva's best to date!, 28 July 2005
By 
Rory Morty "Rory Morty" (Giessen, Germany) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Confessor (Paperback)
This book is outstanding. Weaving the story in with the manipulation and intrigue for which the Vatican is famous, above all else, makes for a breathtakingly exciting plot, and the usual fasciniating cast of solid and well-developed characters for which Silva is renowned. For readers of The Kill Artist and The English Assassin, it is Gabriel Allon at his best, and the familiar cast of other characters previously introduced, like Ari Shamron, do not dissapoint, although this novel is just as good a read if it is your first Daniel Silva. The reader is taken on a fascinating journey through enchanting parts Venice and Rome, as well as the Italian lake district, amongst other exotic locations. The plot itself is solid and well-researched. I cannot recommend this book highly enough. It is one of very few books for which I have both awarded five stars, and have read more than once! My favourite Daniel Silva novel of them all.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Gabriel Allon at his best. Well, almost..., 4 Sep 2014
By 
T. D. Dawson "tdawson735" (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Confessor (Paperback)
In `The Confessor', the third of the Gabriel Allon thrillers, the election of a new Pontiff coincides with the appearance of various papers minuting meetings, during World War II, between officials of the Vatican and the Nazi Party. They clearly show the Vatican's silent complicity with the Nazi policy of Jewish extermination.

As the new Pontiff attempts a final reconciliation between the Catholic Church and Judaism the resistance to his policy within the Curia grows; a number of murders inevitably follow and, since one of them involves a close friend of Gabriel Allon, both Gabriel and Israeli intelligence find themselves drawn into the unfold maelstrom.

I have just one minor criticism: the way Gabriel dealt with an attempt on his life - his rather indiscriminate use of both a Beretta and sub-machine gun leaves four members of the Italian police dead and six wounded - reduced a five star rating to four.

In the earlier books I felt both Gabriel Allon and Ari Shamron were slightly unbelievable characters and in need of further development. In `The Confessor', perhaps helped by the final appearance of the beautiful Chiara Zolli, Daniel Silva has deftly resolved that particular issue and given us a genuinely gripping thriller.

Read and enjoy.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Silva's Allon triumps again!, 10 July 2012
By 
Billy J. Hobbs "Bill Hobbs" (Tyler, TX USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Confessor (Paperback)
This review is from: The Confessor (Hardcover)
Reviewers claim "The Confessor" is Daniel Silva's "best." Could be. The author of the very successful "The English Assassin" has a well-timed book that also involves the Church (did somebody say "The Da Vinci Code"?) and whispered (perhaps actual) conspiracies.

Silva's "art restorer" Gabriel Allon is called into play once again. We know Allon well from "Assassin" and here he is, once again, "recalled into service." The Mossad agent is the perfect man for this job. Again, combining the fine arts, religious concatenations, and 21st century conspiracies, Silva makes his latest well worth the read. In this one, three central personalities figure in: Allon, the writer Benjamin Stern (or rather the life of Stern!), and the newly-elected Pope Paul VII.

It is difficult to find a more mesmerizing theme today than that of the Church's "conspiracies." That said, of course, Silva's book is not entirely devoted to such a story line. In addition, the book is a Rand-McNally of Europe, as the characters bounce back and forth and across Europe's most exiting easels, and Allon is determined, that again, he is not to be framed, chiseled, buffed into submission.

Excitement abounds (not to mention quite a few humanities/fine arts lessons). Highly recommended!
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4.0 out of 5 stars A great read., 5 Feb 2014
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This review is from: The Confessor (Paperback)
Love the author and am working through his earlier stuff. Book was in good condition for 2nd hand and no complaints there. Another time I will check the No of pages as they vary from editions and publishers. On this one it carried really rather small print; viz, less pages. That is the reason for only 4 out of 5.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Neutral Element, 31 Jan 2013
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Pedro (Lisbon, Portugal) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Confessor (Paperback)
"The Confessor" is the third book of the Gabriel Allon series and in my opinion it's the best so far. However, I believe I would've enjoyed it more if I hadn't read "The English Assassin" before.

Someone is assassinated --> Shamron involves Gabriel in the murder case --> it becomes clear that the victim was killed to prevent him from revealing an organization's involvement in the Jewish holocaust during WW2 --> someone central in the plot is targeted by a notorious assassin --> the threat is solved, but not by Allon -- it fits like a glove for both "The English Assassin" and "The Confessor". Most of the characters may be different and they may be travelling to different cities, but I had a constant feeling that I'd read it before.

Also, once again Allon is irrelevant to the story climax, which is a bit irritating. Had he not been there and the outcome would be the same, which is something that also happened in the first two books.

However, it's a fun book to read because it keeps a very high pace, the Catholic Church behavior during WW2 is a captivating theme, and there are also some very tense moments, such as the Rome shootout and the synagogue speech.

+: pace, tension and subject; believable plot from start to finish

-: unoriginal storyline; once again Allon is a non-factor in the book climax

=: If I hadn't read "The English Assassin" before, I would rate it 4 out of 5; even so, "The Confessor" is a book that thriller fans will certainly enjoy
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4.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating, 12 Dec 2012
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Great reading, did not want to put it down. Intricate story, so got a bit lost at times, but worth the effort
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4.0 out of 5 stars reliable as always, 24 Nov 2012
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I have enjoyed Daniel Silva since I first discovered him when someone left one of his books a t a holiday villa we stayed at. I do like his work but feel he's now appraoching his books with a "formula" type I look forward to reading some new angle as felt this was slightly "Dan Brown" though not sure who came first.....
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The Confessor (Gabriel Allon Novels)
The Confessor (Gabriel Allon Novels) by Daniel Silva (Audio CD - 29 Nov 2005)
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