Customer Reviews


18 Reviews
5 star:
 (12)
4 star:
 (3)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:
 (2)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


21 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars giving choice through truth
This a must read for anyone who may wish to consider stopping taking psychiatric medication or wishes to be more informed about such drugs in general. There are few books around which give insight into how to stop taking psychiatric drugs and this is the best. On many occassions when people have stopped taking psychiatric drugs, they have become ill, often this is blamed...
Published on 9 Nov 2004 by Eric Marks

versus
7 of 11 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Your Drug May NOT Be Your Problem
There are many good things about this book which could hugely benefit anyone trying to come off a psychiatric medication. It addresses some of the issues which psychiatrists all-too-often refuse to discuss about the adverse effects of medication and that they can make you feel worse, and teaches you how to SAFELY taper off a medication so your withdrawal symptoms are...
Published on 4 Oct 2008 by S. Witkowski-Baker


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

21 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars giving choice through truth, 9 Nov 2004
This a must read for anyone who may wish to consider stopping taking psychiatric medication or wishes to be more informed about such drugs in general. There are few books around which give insight into how to stop taking psychiatric drugs and this is the best. On many occassions when people have stopped taking psychiatric drugs, they have become ill, often this is blamed on an underlying mental illness such as depression or schizophrenia and psychiatrists offer convincing arguments about the efficency of drugs to their patients, which helps establish a system of psychiatric slavery. Breggin and Cohen present the view that withdrawal or discontinuation of psychiatric drugs can in fact cause serious withdrawal syndromes, which in fact may mimic mental illnesses, such as psychosis or depression and some possible consequences of withdrawal may even cause death. It is of course vital to be properly informed about stopping any such medication and this book gives good information, whilst recommending clinical supervision, though this may not have to be from a psychiatrist.
Highlighted is the lack of open and honest research by drug companies and their inflated claims about their products. This is especially topical as it has recently come to light that Glaxo kept quiet information which showed seroxat to be no more effective than a placebo, whilst having potential for serious side effects. The way in which certain drugs, the neuroleptics, have and are used as chemical restraints, is also themed.
More and more drugs are being prescribed for mental illness and the truth is that very little is known about psychiatric drugs and their effects on the human brain, Breggin and Cohen do not pretend that they know all about the human brain but they do not have an arrogant attitude towards their fellow man either, some psychiatrists do and may even view those that they label as a different type of human being.
This book shows that there are alternatives to drug "therapy" but does not give easy answers either. The truth is that if stopping drugs is your goal, it may be a difficult journey with no guarantee of success but it may be a very rich and rewarding experience too, if only partly successful. The best advice given is not to start taking psychiatric drugs if at all possible and if you do then it is best to use the least possible for the shortest time.
It would be wonderful if all psychiatrists could read this book and affect changes but this will never happen. If you wish to stop taking psychiatric drugs then please read this book as a first step.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Finally!, 4 Aug 1999
By A Customer
I'm a normally functioning working woman with usual pressures from job, children, etc., and I'm amazed to see how quickly my doctor has rushed to prescribe drugs for any complaints I voiced. Xanax, Valium, Zoloft... Try to get off them once you're on them and your doctor doesn't believe that they're making things worse! I found this book to be a true revelation and wish it had been around before I got started with drugs, when all I needed was some understanding -- and maybe a vacation. With age and maturity, I've realized that anxiety and depression are also the price to pay for life's joys and accomplishments. This book brings a really refreshing perspective, and is packed full of information that I've read nowhere else. This is a must-read for anybody who's been handed a prescription for psychiatric drugs.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent source of hard-to-find drug information., 16 Aug 1999
By A Customer
This is the perfect book for anyone who wonders why she or he feels WORSE -- whether emotionally or physically -- when using psychiatric drugs like Prozac or lithium. Both easy to understand and thoroughly researched, "Your Drug May Be Your Problem" explains why the drugs are dangerous, how to safely stop using them, and how to deal with emotional crises without resorting to drugs. In a culture in which psychiatric drugs are pushed by everyone from the White House down to the neighborhood elementary school, this book is a refreshing change. I WISH I'd had the information contained in this book six years ago when doctors put me on a nightmarish regimen of psychiatric drugs. All in all, a fascinating and enlightening read.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This book saved my life, 6 July 2009
By 
William K (UK & Ireland) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Your Drug May Be Your Problem: How and Why to Stop Taking Psychiatric Medications (Paperback)
A chat with my local GP when I was 17 about how shy and moody I was (a normal teenage condition!!!)led to him prescribing me an SSRI which led to a 6 month improvement (on reflection a fake high) followed by a complete mental breakdown after the initial 6 months, I then had a 5 year long nightmare of going through a range of progressively higher doses of various different drugs (tri-cyclics and other anti-depressants also), almost weekly thoughts of suicide, losing almost all my friends, losing all confidence and self-esteem - basically no life for 5 years. But no, my Psychiatrist and GP still insisted, no matter how much I disputed it, that I "had a chemical imbalance" that needed fixing and I should not give up the drugs- I grew increasingly convinced that the drugs were making me depressed; I was a shadow of my former self, a complete nervous wreck - well surprise surprise I took the plunge, gave up the drugs completely (thanks to books such as this which convinced me; took a few months of lowering the dose and completely against my Doctors advice)- it was like waking up out of a bad dream, or sobering up after being drunk; within a year I was my normal self again (though the struggle to regain my confidence has taken much longer).

Trust me on this one, there is something seriously wrong with anti-depressant drugs and they should only be relied on in the most severe of cases (almost never) and then only temporarily - ECT is a joke quitefrankly.

If you suffer from depression try the following instead and I guarantee you the benefits will be infinitely better than anything antidepressant drugs will do for you; take up a rigorous sport or other physical activity such as running (just take lots of exercise - a natural anti-depressant), cut down severely on caffeine and alcohol (not completely - you need to enjoy life), give up any illegal drugs completely (esp 'soft' drugs such as cannabis, ecstasy and speed - they are a serious depressant and some people naturally suffer their effects far worse than others!), change your diet, be positive and keep busy (extremely important), get out of the house as much as possible and do not take time off work because of depression unless it's just a week or 2 to de-stress. Remove yourself from stressful relationships...

you get the picture, there is an infinite combination of natural remedies to depression as well as an infinite number of causes - drug companies would have you believe there is only 1 cause 'a chemical imbalance'; tell me, which makes more sense??? (I know which one makes a lot more money...)

Don't be deterred by the religious zeal and over-the-top'ness of this authors books - he is a bit of a one-sided nut, I'll admit, but nonetheless he has a hell of a point and much of what he says is true!I am living proof.
:-)
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A view from within, 20 Mar 2008
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Your Drug May Be Your Problem: How and Why to Stop Taking Psychiatric Medications (Paperback)
I bought this book due to experiencing first hand resistance from Doctors in regards to looking at psychiatric medication as a cause for worsening symptoms in patients. It's absolutely true that most Doctors will view symptoms such as agitation and aggression as a factor of the illness instead of due to a side-effect of the medication. I thoroughly agree with the Authors that if a patient deteriorates after receiving treatment then the treatment should be assessed first however I encounter barriers from both the Doctors and often my colleagues too. Doctors will perform a whole series of blood tests and scans to ascertain a cause before even considering side-effects, this is a costly approach. Most Doctors will use the argument that these side-effects are rare in the belief that for some reason that excludes their patients, I specialise in Elderly care and it's well documented that side-effects are more common in the Elderly and Children.

The reason I only gave the book 4 stars is because I felt that the focus on Psychiatric drugs exclusively could give the impression that other drugs do not have similar side-effects. 30% of side-effects relating to general medicines are neuro-psychiatric. Proton-pump inhibitors for example can cause both depression and psychotic symptoms. I believe it would be useful in a future edition of the book to add a chapter on the psychiatric risks associated with non-psychiatric medications.

Also the Authors suggested that Physical restraint may be preferable to medication restraint. I disagree with this because with physical restraint a patient continues to be agitated and suffering the symptoms, the physical restraint approach doesn't alleviate the mental suffering and can place tremendous stress on the patient. In the UK we do not use any mechanical restraints with patients.

Finally one area of advice that the book suggested was very misleading and potentially hazardous. The Authors stated

'skilled individuals using sound therapeutic approaches are almost always able to calm down upset and menacing patients without the use of drugs'.

Are the Authors including Violent and Aggressive patients in this sentence, I read it that they were and from experience I can think of numerous cases where de-escalation skills are not effective and where patients do require medication, especially if the patient is confused or delirious. I would advise any therapist to be very cautious in following the Author's advice here.

On the whole the book is an excellent source of information for Health Professionals with experience in challenging Doctor's opinion. I felt very supported by most of the Author's views.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very helpful, 28 Sep 2010
This review is from: Your Drug May Be Your Problem: How and Why to Stop Taking Psychiatric Medications (Paperback)
Over the last 20 years I have taken many of the drugs mentioned in this book. I have suffered with side effects and have long term kidney problems caused by one drug. I have tried on a number of occasions to come off the drugs and failed, the reason being that I couldn't tolerate the withdrawal effects, these were many times seen to be a relapse of my 'illness' and I was then put on another drug. Following three years of a new psych and CPN who believe strongly in therapeutic approaches rather than drugs I'm now off the medication having be taught coping strategies and also doing a lot of hard work using CBT. I am now ready and determined that I can live a drug free existence, I am coping with the withdrawal effects well and have the support in place around me.
This book has been a huge help, though I do find it to be quite alarming to read and one needs to be ready and able to decide for ones self when the time is right to come off the medication. I have never felt better than I do now medication free!
Overall I think this is an excellent book, but quite frightening to read if you're not ready to begin the process.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Vital information for treatment providers and consumers., 5 Aug 1999
By A Customer
Peter Breggin and David Cohen have compiled critically important information that should be read by mental health treatment providers and consumers as well. The material is presented in a clear and concise way and covers issues of medication effects, the "pseudo-science" behind medications and discusses why medications are too often relied upon as the only "effective" treatment. This book is a great resource.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Just the book I needed to help my friend, 3 Sep 2010
This book is a very useful one. It shows the dangers of psychiatric drugs, points out to the obvious fact that they seldom help you, and make you see your grief as something you should accept - along with, of course, the obesity and many side effects which taking them entails. But also, much more important than that, Peter Breggin's work gives you proven methods enabling you to free yourself from addiction.
Peter Breggin is no crook: he has been a psychiatrist for 40 years, and has won MANY a legal case against the almighty American big pharma, being an expert in pharmacology. In MEDICATION MADNESS, he explains how, while dealing with a case involving Prozac, he had access for a second time to confidential documents... and could only notice that some of them were missing, being used as he was to the classification of the docs. Scary? Hmmmm.... That's not the least scary thing about mood drugs.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An eye opener, 16 July 2009
By 
J. Tucker "joffoir" (cardiff) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Your Drug May Be Your Problem: How and Why to Stop Taking Psychiatric Medications (Paperback)
An informative and very readable book which raises some serious questions about the use of anti depressants and anti psychotic drugs as well as making you think a little more about pharmaceutical companies and their underlying motives (i.e. money). It doesn't encourage self treatment or the shunnning of trained professionals but it does make one wary of how well they are informed about the potential risks of anti depressants, particularly as regards their use for children and the right methods of withdrawing treatment. If you or your child are taking prozac, ritalin or any other anti depressant, I recommend you read this book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The hidden truth about psychiatric medications, 2 Jun 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Your Drug May Be Your Problem: How and Why to Stop Taking Psychiatric Medications (Paperback)
I have read some of the books written by Dr Breggin, including the previous editions of this one and I am now reading his latest book "Brain Disabling Treatments in Psychiatry". In "Your drug may be your problem" both Breggin and Cohen explain what exactly these drugs do to the body and mind and give comprehensive information invaluable to start a meaningful collaboration with your psychiatrist if you are under treatment and wish to quit these drugs to recover your life. I have had the disgusting experience of witnessing psychiatric drug damage unfolding upon people - sometimes with fatal results - in various UK psychiatric hospitals over the last 12 years, thus I can identify well with the dangers Breggin points out. From this experience, I recommend the book to anyone - whether as a professional or patient - having a link with this profession. I very much like the unbiased and uncomplicated explanations. The only minus points in the book are that you get the impression it is written for americans whereas it has made the bookshelves in many parts of the world, plus the lack of professional points of contact and treatment in Europe and elsewhere from professionals who believe that there is a life without drugs and that drugs do not resolve emotional problems, they worsen them. Some patient readers would be glad to know where to go for help locally without having to travel to New York to find a sympathetic professional.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First
ARRAY(0xb6a08588)

This product

Your Drug May Be Your Problem: How and Why to Stop Taking Psychiatric Medications
10.79
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews