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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very useful
I bought this book as I'm studying to be a personal trainer & found it most helpful with some of the core subjects I'm covering.

I'm also a keen gym goer and found it useful to help with my workouts and mix it up a bit.

For £9.65 it's a no brainer and definitely worth every penny and is a wealth of solid information.
Published 21 months ago by Wayne Scott

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Very good if you don't already have a book like this.
I already have a book on anatomy and was hoping this would come at it from a different angle. If you have already got a book on anatomy i wouldn't waste your time, from the ones iv'e already seen they all pretty do much the same thing.

If you haven't got a book on anatomy, this book is great. Brilliant for a beginner who doesn't want a bog standard book on...
Published 5 months ago by Nathan P


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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very useful, 24 Jan 2013
This review is from: Strength Training Anatomy (Sports Anatomy) (Paperback)
I bought this book as I'm studying to be a personal trainer & found it most helpful with some of the core subjects I'm covering.

I'm also a keen gym goer and found it useful to help with my workouts and mix it up a bit.

For £9.65 it's a no brainer and definitely worth every penny and is a wealth of solid information.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Training for oldies, 17 Dec 2012
By 
Mr. G. Bourne - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Strength Training Anatomy (Sports Anatomy) (Paperback)
At 65 with various muscle problems this book is invaluable when I go to the gym. I use it to plan all my exercises and know exactly what muscles I will be working so as to avoid any injuries. I would definitely recommend this to anyone using the gym and relevant weights.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Very good if you don't already have a book like this., 10 May 2014
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This review is from: Strength Training Anatomy (Sports Anatomy) (Paperback)
I already have a book on anatomy and was hoping this would come at it from a different angle. If you have already got a book on anatomy i wouldn't waste your time, from the ones iv'e already seen they all pretty do much the same thing.

If you haven't got a book on anatomy, this book is great. Brilliant for a beginner who doesn't want a bog standard book on anatomy.This book is definitely for a beginner who wants more depth in their knowledge.

From my angle what i was hoping this book would have is more detailed instructions on the movement. e.g steps 1-2-3. The common mistakes people perform on a a given exercise.(so you can have perfect form when doing an exercise or get the most out of an exercise) Also maybe some sort of rating system of which exercises would be better, why you'd choose this exercise over another that sort of thing.

Decent book like i say if you already haven't got a book on anatomy.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book. Detailed and to the point., 8 Aug 2011
By 
Alejandro Gonzalez Morales (Barcelona, Spain) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Strength Training Anatomy (Sports Anatomy) (Paperback)
I purchased two book by Frederic Delavier. This one and The Strength Training Anatomy Workout. They are both very useful but this one broadens the scope of the the other one.

Strength Training Anatomy is organized by muscle groups. It has a very useful general index at the beginning of the book and another one specific to each muscle group that makes finding an specific exercise quite easy. It describes a lot of exercises, in great detail. It explains how to perform each one in a way to obtain the most out of it, while advising clearly of the things to avoid in order to maintain proper form and keeping injuries away.
Each exercise has a detailed drawing that makes it so much easier to understand how the muscles work and perform. It also shows the relation of joint, bones and muscles for many of the exercises. The book offers also many variations to classic exercises, explaining what muscles will be then used the most.

It has drawings and full explanations on stretching and how to avoid injuries for each muscle group. These pages are clearly marked by red and yellow, making them even easier to find.

I think it's very practical and I keep going back to it to check how to properly execute a given exercise. I also check it to find alternative exercises when I don't have access to a gym or when some of the exercises require certain machines that are not available. If you want to target an specific muscle, chances are you'll find in this book a few exercises tailored to your needs. The same is true for multi-joint exercises.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars EXCELLENT reference book, 13 Oct 2011
By 
Kate "Kate" (Birmingham, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Strength Training Anatomy (Sports Anatomy) (Paperback)
I am a relatively experienced gym-goer - been training regularly for about 15 years and I consider myself knowledgeable on issues relating with weight-training. I still found this book very useful in giving me a better, more professional, insight into how different muscle groups respond during the execution of different variations of exercises. It even helped me realise that some of the routines that I switch to now and then did not really maximise the effectiveness of my workout as they did not exactly target the fibres I thought they did.

All in all, a MUST for anyone who starts or is thinking to start weights training - it will save you developing an awful lot of bad habits (be it poor posture, poor execution or suboptimal use of your workout time). Also, the book gives very useful instructions on stretching routines - which again is a good idea to follow and get used to them from early on as they WILL save you injuries later on.

For more experienced lifters, well my opinion is that it is still a useful reference book. You will of course probably find out that you know most of the exercises cited in there - but again the focus is not as much on teaching you new routines, but explaining in full detail what happens "inside the box" when you execute these routines. Unless you have physio training, you are unlikely to have seen this information before at this level of detail - I hadn't.

All in all, a good investment.
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16 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars ==Lots of Strengths==, 15 July 2011
This review is from: Strength Training Anatomy (Sports Anatomy) (Paperback)
With over 450,000 copies sold, this book is arguably the best book of its kind. What's it useful for? Mainly to help the reader (from the weekend athlete to the athletic trainer to the professional bodybuilder) figure out what exercises work what muscles.

It's neatly divided up into sections (arms, shoulders, chest, back, etc.), so all you really have to do is flip to one of these sections and it will have detailed pictures of various exercises and exactly which muscles are involved.

A great reference to keep have around, I give it five stars easy. Readers who lift weights regularly might also be interested Treat Your Own Rotator Cuff to avoid shoulder problems a lot of lifters eventually get.
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18 of 24 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Title something of a misnomer?, 24 Feb 2012
By 
A DARLEY - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Strength Training Anatomy (Sports Anatomy) (Paperback)
This is a reasonably good book. It provides many useful illustrations of the human musculature that are relevant to those who frequent gyms. You can learn what all the parts are called that you want to know about probably better than you can from a traditional anatomy book.

There is a complaint here, though. The book is titled 'Strength Training Anatomy' but the bulk of the book is devoted to depictions of single-joint isolation exercises, along with their many variations, performed by those who are chiefly concerned with the aesthetic appearance of their physique and not so much by those who train for functional strength. As if to reinforce this, the book's chapters read like a bodybuilder's split routine, with chapters for "Arms", "Shoulders", "Chest", "Back", "Legs", "Buttocks" and "Abdomen". The importance of isolation movements seems to be magnified out of proportion. For example, pages 6-18 are devoted to curl variations alone. When you come to the pages on the squat, the bench press and the deadlift you might be underwhelmed by the paucity of content. The standing barbell press, or simply the press, one of the best exercises for functional strength, and especially of the shoulders, does not even receive a mention in the "Shoulders" section of the book. Instead there is a depiction of the rather specific "seated front press" variation. The Olympic lifts and their power variations also lack any coverage in the book. If the book had been titled 'Bodybuilding Anatomy' then I think this would not be an issue of contention and it would more accurately reflect the content.

There are many interesting tidbits scattered throughout the book. Despite my complaints in the paragraph above, I am not completely unconcerned with aesthetics. In that vein, there are useful pointers about how a particular exercise can emphasize the effort on a particular head of a multi-headed muscle which you might think is lacking. And there is even information that purports to tell you how to place the emphasis on particular fibres of a muscle, or at the muscle's distal or proximal end. Whether this latter information can actually be put into practice or not, I do not know. There are also a few useful hints about the dangers of some exercises or performing them with poor technique. There is not a high word count to this book, however, and the text accompanying the illustrations is often vague and superficial. It seems in places to attempt to instruct on correct technique, but the compound barbell movements in particular are really too complicated to be properly addressed in such a terse fashion. If you did buy or are thinking about buying this because you are seeking instruction on strength exercises, then a better starting place is 'Starting Strength: Basic Barbell Training' by Mark Rippetoe, and I recommend you defer to it on correct technique for the exercises it covers.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The BEST book out there...still!!!, 13 Jun 2011
This review is from: Strength Training Anatomy (Sports Anatomy) (Paperback)
I can only recommend this book to everyone who wants to know exactly which muscle groups are worked out with which exercise.

I'm a personal trainer myself and find it extremely useful for my work with the clients. It does not only tell about the anatomy but also about the different body shapes. It's the only book I have found so far which even explains the differences of individual calf shapes, individual bone shapes, leg lengths or shoulder builds of people. It explains precisely why some people can or cannot perform some exercises in a specific way just because of the fact they are differently shaped.

It is the best anatomy book for exercises out there jet...if you want more then just muscle pictures then go for this book. I cannot recommend it highly enough.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars great book, 21 Jan 2013
This review is from: Strength Training Anatomy (Sports Anatomy) (Paperback)
I learn a lot with this book.. its like your own personal trainer. Shows how to take care of your own body.
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5.0 out of 5 stars I'll recommed it, 11 July 2014
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This review is from: Strength Training Anatomy (Sports Anatomy) (Paperback)
Really good reference book. It helps to do the right and correct execrises.
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Strength Training Anatomy (Sports Anatomy)
Strength Training Anatomy (Sports Anatomy) by Frederic Delavier (Paperback - 6 April 2010)
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