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4.7 out of 5 stars
Where's Spot? (Spot - Original Lift The Flap)
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
I bought this book last year and I loved it! It's dinner time and Spot's mum is trying to find "naughty Spot", so she starts searching for him around the house... in the clock, in the piano, under the rug; every time she opens a door (i.e., every time you flip a flap), a strange guess is there to say 'No', Spot is not there... It's great in case you're teaching household objects and prepositions! Highly recommended!
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on 5 June 2001
My two toddlers absolutely adore this book. The large flaps are especially suitable for a 2 year olds grubby little fingers. The bright colours and interactive elements of Sally's search for Spot are especially attractive. My particular 2 year old sits on the floor turning the pages on her own and laughing with delight. I highly recommend this book.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 6 May 2010
This is a lovely edition of the old favourite. The type is clear and ideal for a learner reader and the thicker paper pages are easier for turning without fear of tears or creases. Lift-the-flap books are always popular in this house and with Spot involved "guess who's behind this door" games are extra fun. This edition is likely to live on the bookcase far longer than others might have done.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on 10 December 2010
The perfect story for tots - our 1 year old is enthralled and loves the flaps. Just the right length, colourful illustrations and a joyous ending - a childhood must-have.
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44 of 51 people found the following review helpful
on 3 October 2014
‘Where is Spot’ is one of the 20th century’s great post-structuralist texts, and essential reading for undergrads and critics alike. To give this text the treatment it deserves, it’s necessary to wade through the many thousands of papers that have been published on it since Hill first burst onto the literary scene in 1980, and peel the text back to its most basic (and profound) elements.

Let us begin by asking ourselves, can Spot ever be found? This is really the core question of Hill’s seminal work. Following in the tradition of Derrida, Lacan and Boudrillard, Hill is a provocateur, and the very title of this book is a challenge. How can we ‘spot’ Spot, when the act of perceiving cannot ever be perceived?

Ultimately, by asking ‘Where is Spot?’, Hill is asking us to question whether meaning itself can ever truly be grasped, whether our hunger for symbols can ever be sated, or whether we are destined, like Spot’s mother, to search through a linguistic maze of our own making until we die.

Let’s look for a moment at how her doomed quest for meaning begins: “Naughty Spot! It’s dinner time. Where can he be?” Here Hill almost catches us unwary, tempting us to dive immediately into the hypnosis of categorisation that lies beneath the surface of all narrative. But at the same time he is urging us to hold back, to wait before we answer. Where is Spot? We do not know, and perhaps we never will.

“Dinner time” is an unmistakeable reference to desire in the Foucauldian sense. The unwary reader wishes to gorge themselves on meaning, and it is this blind desire which ultimately leads Spot’s mother on her futile quest.

“Is he under the stairs?” she asks. Is he indeed. Spot may well be under the stairs, hidden beneath this clear symbol of hierarchy. But he isn’t there, we are told. And who imparts this information, who tears down of our oh-so treasured certainty in the meta-narrative? The lion; a glaring symbol of patriarchy.

Hill’s expert illustration tells us all we need to know; the lion looks surprised, scared. Patriarchy, presented with the futility of its own categorisation, cannot hold itself together.

Some critics have argued that Spot’s eventual discovery in a basket is Hill’s way of celebrating the Sublime, of telling us that there is indeed a greater meaning beyond the mess of symbols that we live in. But they overlooking a critical element. After he is found, Spot is immediately ordered by his mother, here playing the role of the dark feminine archetype, to go and ‘eat your dinner’.

He is, like the ouroboros, destined to live forever in a cycle of consumption and desire that traps us all. Hill explores Spot’s resulting decline into the mediocrity of bourgeoisie life in his critically-acclaimed sequels, ‘Spot Goes to School’, ‘Spot Goes on Holiday’ and ‘Spot’s Day Out’, but ‘Where is Spot?’ remains his most challenging and exciting work to date.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 22 May 2010
My daughter had a copy of this book when she was little and loved it, so I bought this boardbook copy for my grandson. He loves it, just like his mummy!
He likes lifting the flaps and the book is one of his favourites - still a winner with the next generation.
This particular copy is a good size, very colourful and a must for the nursery bookshelf!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 29 December 2006
A neat book with good illustrations of flaps that are easy for a toddlers fingers to grasp make for an entertaining book my my little one: it's one of her favourite books. It is a fun "read" and helps the child to learn the names of the animals and spot's mum searches for him. I shall be getting more in the series.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 21 March 2010
My daughter loves this book. It is the first book my husband and I bought her. She loves opening the flaps to see what is behind it, especially when mommy makes noises with some of the animals. Realistically having all these animals in the house would be a nightmare, but for a book it is great fun. My daughter asks for this book, looks for it and cries to be read it time and time again. She is now a year old and still loves this. We bought her another spot book (spot goes to the farm), she loves it but not as much as this one.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 21 December 2009
We first came across this book on holiday and my 14 month old son loved it, wanting us to read it again and again. He loved lifting the flaps, and it helps that the size of the flaps is perfect for little hands, so we had to get our own copy when we came home.

The menagerie of animals is quite delightful and useful if you are trying to teach your child about different animals.

A perfect gift for a toddler.

Where's Spot? (Spot Lift the Flap)
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 14 April 2011
My one year old absolutely loves this book. The flaps are interactive and the bold, bright images are ideal to grab his attention. I would highly recommend this book
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