Customer Reviews

8
5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
8
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
POW: Allied Prisoners in Europe, 1939-45
Format: PaperbackChange
Price:£8.99+Free shipping with Amazon Prime

Your rating(Clear)Rate this item
Share your thoughts with other customers

There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on 2 November 2006
The author describes the experiences of British and American prisoners of war at the hands of their German and Italian captors during World War II. It is an enormous subject and Gilbert does an excellent job, drawing a revealing picture of what it was like to be a prisoner of war. He covers key topics such as capture, transit, interrogation, escape and release, but perhaps the most interesting part of this book is his discussion of the social aspects of POW life that include, among many other things, the role of cigarettes in the camp economy, the importance of music and theatre in keeping up the men's spirits and the punishments for those who transgressed POW law. There is also much of interest on leadership and discipline within the camp system, the differences between the officer oflags and the stalags of the NCOs and ORs, and relations between British and US POWs and the other nationalities they came across. Well-written, with new angles and much unpublished material POW is an first-rate overview of the subject.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
This has been my first reading concerning the fate of POW's in Germany and Italy during WW2, which has been previously confined to the stereotypical image portrayed in the numerous dramatised films from the period. It is a very detailed book, yet extremely readable. The use of primary sources, in terms of recollections from POW's is used sparingly, but powerful in giving the historical text a true "lift".

The final chapters on liberation, and homecoming, are understandably emotional ones, and once again leave the reader with a partial appreciation of the horrors and privations endured by our parents and grand-parents in this complex society of POW camps.

The images created will stay with me, and help to reinforce a growing empathy for the lives and experiences of these men who had to endure captivity, isolation, and that feeling of not knowing what awful fate that tomorrow

could have,and did, reveal for them in their day-to-day, and hand-to-mouth existence.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on 13 December 2006
The book tells the stories of 11 prisoners of war, how they were captured and what happened to them in the hands of the German and Italians. What really interested me was the many things PoWs got up to while they were behind the wire, eg what there living conditions were like, the sort of work they had to do, and how they resisted the Germans by whatever means they had at their disposal. Gilbert writes about some escapers I hadn't heard about, including an RAF sergeant called Grimson and John Peck, an Australian who hoodwinked the Germans in Italy. He reckons they were even better than the `Red Fox' (Mike Sinclair) who was killed escaping from Colditz. There is a lot of information in this book but it is a real page turner.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 9 July 2007
This has been my first reading concerning the fate of POW's in Germany and Italy during WW2, which has been previously confined to the stereotypical image portrayed in the numerous dramatised films from the period. It is a very detailed book, yet extremely readable. The use of primary sources, in terms of recollections from POW's is used sparingly, but powerful in giving the historical text a true "lift".
The final chapters on liberation, and homecoming, are understandably emotional ones, and once again leave the reader with a partial appreciation of the horrors and privations endured by our parents and grand-parents in this complex society of POW camps.
The images created will stay with me, and help to reinforce a growing empathy for the lives and experiences of these men who had to endure captivity, isolation, and that feeling of not knowing what awful fate that tomorrow could have, and did, reveal for them in their day-to-day, and hand-to-mouth existence.
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on 21 July 2008
I picked this book up cheaply and somewhat randomly on Charing Cross Road not knowing what to expect. It turned out to be one of the best books I have read in a long while. The way Adrian Gilbert weaves the stories of 11 men within the overall POW story is what makes it such a good read. Gilbert - in a wonderfully lucid style covers every aspect of POW from capture through to spiritual well being and escape. This book is a fitting tribute to these forgotten heroes
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 7 January 2008
Books for me are separated by how easy they are to read. This took a short while to get into and then after that became one of those I could not put down. As a result it rates very highly for me as I burnt the midnight oil as I wanted to hear the next instalment in the life of the individuals in the book.

It is an excellent book and well worth purchasing. The stories are brought to life in a manner which does not seek to overly dramatise what was a horrific experience for so many people.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 9 March 2009
I bought this book as an aide to my own research into my father's time as a POW. I found it an extremely easy to read book with good accounts of life as a prisoner of war, and a must for anyone wanting to know more about this subject.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 27 September 2013
The book was in the condition described, delivered on time and packaged securely. I would purchase from this seller again.
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this item also viewed

Prisoner of War in Germany (Shire Library)
Prisoner of War in Germany (Shire Library) by Peter Doyle (Paperback - 10 July 2008)
£5.99

 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.

Sponsored Links

  (What is this?)
  -  
Free Search of Prisoners of WWI on Genes Reunited