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51 of 54 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A brilliant book on a disturbed era of English history!
Having a large interest in the local history of East Anglia I immediately became absorbed into this book. The writing style is a perfect balance of facts, quotes, political background information in relation to the Civil War, religious views of the times and objective research by the author, making this a joy to read. The pages turned a lot faster than normal for a book...
Published on 30 Sep 2005 by Iceni Peasant

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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars 16th century witch finding
The book starts of with a broad history of 16th century England covering mainly political & religious issues. The narrative throughout the book is largely following the so called savage witch hunt of 1645 - 1647 instigated by the 2 famous protagonists Matthew Hopkins & John Stearne.
The author & his research know more about Hopkins' father & other siblings than about...
Published on 27 Aug 2011 by iwannabeme


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51 of 54 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A brilliant book on a disturbed era of English history!, 30 Sep 2005
By 
Iceni Peasant (Norfolk, England) - See all my reviews
Having a large interest in the local history of East Anglia I immediately became absorbed into this book. The writing style is a perfect balance of facts, quotes, political background information in relation to the Civil War, religious views of the times and objective research by the author, making this a joy to read. The pages turned a lot faster than normal for a book set in this era!
The book follows the rise AND fall of the famous Witchfinders, Matthew Hopkins and John Stearne from their large scale witch hunts in the 1640's. Starting in their local area of Manningtree in Essex and spreading, like the contempory and proverbial plague, through into Suffolk, Norfolk, Huntinghdonshire and Cambridgeshire and further, with ultimate influence on the witch hunts in America.
The personal details of the witchfinders characters and views along with their methods of finding witches is just compelling reading. Most of the time the reader will feel many emotions, from suprise and incredulity at the so-called confessions of witches to utter disbelief and revulsion at how people such as judges and jurors sentenced these confused and often poor women AND men for execution from such peculiar methods of proof from the witchfinders.
The book concludes, telling of how the two main witchfinders ended their days, and what legacy they left behind in society. With a neat little conclusion on how far humanity has come and that some countries still use witch hunts.
An excellent read! 5 Stars!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very good, 26 Dec 2012
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If you like non fiction history this book is excellent
Very well researched,and includes lots of reference from original documents
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars 16th century witch finding, 27 Aug 2011
By 
iwannabeme (Carnoustie, Scotland) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Witchfinders: A Seventeenth-century English Tragedy (Paperback)
The book starts of with a broad history of 16th century England covering mainly political & religious issues. The narrative throughout the book is largely following the so called savage witch hunt of 1645 - 1647 instigated by the 2 famous protagonists Matthew Hopkins & John Stearne.
The author & his research know more about Hopkins' father & other siblings than about the man himself. Throughout the book the information on Hopkins in very sketchy to put it mildly, which will come as a major disappointment to many readers, the fact is no one actually knows hard facts about the witch finder and unfortunately never will. The research on John Stearne is even worse. Giving the author credit, he manages to follow Stearne's witch hunt & journey from 1645+, but information regarding his past is non existent.
The author takes great liberties, constantly suggesting that Hopkins 'may have' done this this or been there, that 'it bears the hallmarks of' Hopkins 'probably' visited such & such etc.
The author waxes lyrical about religious issues from the 1st chapter & this theme continues throughout the entire book. I found this extremely tedious, mr Gaskill I get the message loud & clear, there's no need to consantly remind the reader that England was a very godly society in the grip of civil war, imo this is just lazy filler.
After labouring through the entire book I would suggest that that the 'mass murderer' Hopkins was in truth responsible for perhaps under 100 executions. After 1645 many so called witches were aquitted during trial despite the best efforts of the well paid witch finders to have them liquidated. The whole book concludes with Hopkins death & Stearne's disappearance into historical obscurity. Apparently witch hunts continued after 1647 but on a reduced scale.
Overall an informative but very dry boring read. Only for the hardcore Hopkins buff.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Nothing to fire up the imagination..., 6 July 2014
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This review is from: Witchfinders: A Seventeenth-century English Tragedy (Paperback)
I thought this was a well written and well researched book. Its content adheres closely to the primary sources paying attention to the details. Unfortunately, for me that’s its drawback. There’s very little attempt to explain or contextualise the strange practices that are referred to. And there is a lot of repetition - one witches’ confession is very like any other and here they are reeled off interminably. There’s little sense of time and place just a chronological re-writing of the sources. The English Civil War and the religious conflicts of the time serve as a backdrop to the ‘action’ and there’s presumed knowledge of these topics on the part of the author.

A fascinating subject that twenty-first century historians can say so much about. Sadly there’s none of that here.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 2 July 2014
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This review is from: Witchfinders: A Seventeenth-century English Tragedy (Paperback)
Very interesting book
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5.0 out of 5 stars Many excellent reviews of this book have already been posted, 27 Jun 2014
This review is from: Witchfinders: A Seventeenth-century English Tragedy (Paperback)
Many excellent reviews of this book have already been posted, but it was such a pleasure reading this book that I wanted to add my opinion. This is an outstanding book. The writing style made the reading almost effortless. I almost regretted finishing. I would recommend the book to anyone of any interest level, even students of writing who want to see how such a book should be written. To call it outstanding would not be enough.
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5.0 out of 5 stars An eye-opening, soul-wringing history, 23 Jan 2014
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This review is from: Witchfinders: A Seventeenth-century English Tragedy (Paperback)
I felt stunned and in a state of shock that this could have happened in my own, civilised, supposedly law-abiding country. Of course there were circumstances around that influenced events (the English Civil War, poor weather, poor harvests, starvation, etc.) but it really IS an English tragedy.

If your only brush with this subject is the Vincent Price film, read this. The truth is just so much more horrible. Very well-written, entertaining and informative. I have also bought this book for friends.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A Thought Provoker!, 2 July 2013
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This review is from: Witchfinders: A Seventeenth-century English Tragedy (Paperback)
Gaskill presents an approachable account of seventeenth century self-appointed witchfinders Matthew Hopkins and John Stearne. Both are driven by godly ambition and duty to rid society of witches. Although Gaskill presents a broad history of witchcraft there are certain gaps and one could argue that the book is not entirely about Hopkins and Stearne. Between 1563 and 1736, witchcraft was an offence punishable to the point of execution. However, Gaskill focuses on the relentless persecution of men and women suspected of being witches during the civil war of the mid 1640s in the East Anglain counties. It is important to acknowledge that the usual suspects were women. Nevertheless no one regardless of position held in ecclesiastical circles would escape a witchcraft trial should such suspicions arise. For example, the Reverend John Lowes vicar of Brandeston, was executed by hanging for witchcraft. Public executions were a source of entertainment for the masses. It is important to acknowledge that Gaskill does not credit Hopkins with finding Lowes to be a witch, instead suggesting that he may have read about Lowes in a pamphlet one of many cursing witches. Moreover, Lowes had caused offense with his anti-Calvinist views as early as 1615.

To have a neighbourly dispute followed by death or sickness of people or animals, or to be rumoured to have imps or small animals was enough for one to be accused of witchcraft. Furthermore, the witchfinders could not have managed without those who spread the rumours about suspected witches. When an accusation arose, the suspect in question was visited by Hopkins or Stearne accompanied by 'watchers/ searchers, who would strip the suspect to find teats which supposedly fed the imps or small animals. The watchers would stay at the suspect's house all night to see if they would allow the imps or animals to suckle them (such 'teats' could have been piles or polyps). The suspect would be deprived of sleep with their feet tied underneth them to force a confession from them. Swimming the suspects was another way of establishing whether or not they were witches. If the suspect floated then this established them as a witch!! This book for me says more about the background of superstition there must have been around the seventeenth cenury than about Hopkins and Stearne. It seems that the general population was caught in a frenzy which was hard to dispel. It is unknown how many interrogations were held by Hopkins and Stearne, Gaskill suggests about three hundred of whom around a hundred were executed. Moreover, in his epilogue,Gaskill demonstrates that although the Witchcraft Act was repealed in 1736, until the twentieth century suspected witches continued to be scratched, swam and even murdered. In fact there was a lynching as late as 1945. Furthermore, witch-hunts in sub-Saharan Africa are endemic. In fact it is widespread throughout Africa. For instance it is reported by The Ministry of Home Affairs in Tanzania that as many as 5,000 suspected witches were murdered between 1994 and 1998. In addition, between 1985-95 in South Africa's Northern Province which is poverty-stricken, two hundred lynchings of witches were recorded although the real number is believed to be much higher. This prompts Gaskill to raise the question as to how different the contemporary human mentality is from the seventeenth century mentality. It's really quite ghastly.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Does what it says on the cover, 25 May 2013
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Mr. M. W. Wabe (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Witchfinders: A Seventeenth-century English Tragedy (Paperback)
I was researching a lecture on witches and witchcraft in East Anglia and this is an excellent source book, packed with information
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars More info please, 10 April 2012
By 
A. C. Dickens (Bexhill-on-Sea England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Witchfinders: A Seventeenth-century English Tragedy (Paperback)
Perhaps I was expecting too much from this book, but I found it very disappointing. By focussing almost exclusively on the activities of Hopkins and Stearne and their unfortunate victims, the author has ignored much of the background to witchcraft which might have shed more light on the issue. How, for example, did British witchfinding fit in with European witchfinding practices, which were far more widespread? How did the idea originate of identifying witches by searching for "teats" which Satan's agents - bugs and mice etc - suckled on? Did people use the accusation of witchery to try to get rid of unproductive members of society? Why is the notion of witchcraft so widespread - most countries and most civilisations seem to have embraced it. These matters are hinted at but never developed. Much of the book is devoted to quoting or paraphrasing reports of those accusing witches or of witches' "confessions". This gets tedious after a while, and I kept waiting for some analysis of the information, some summary, some inspirational thoughts.
So little is known about Hopkins and Stearne - their activities alone cannot sustain an entire book.
There were a few comments at the end of the book which opened the debate out a little, but I would have liked a lot more. In fact I obtained more hard information from a ten-minute scan of Wikipedia articles.
The subject of witchcraft and its origins is potentially fascinating, and I would love to read a decent book on it. This isn't it.
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Witchfinders: A Seventeenth-century English Tragedy
Witchfinders: A Seventeenth-century English Tragedy by Malcolm Gaskill (Paperback - 24 April 2006)
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