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Atlantis Found: Dirk Pitt #15 (The Dirk Pitt Adventures)
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful
I hadn't read any Cussler, let alone any Dirk Pitt novels before. This one caught my attention because the Atlantis theme coincides with my interest in humankind's prehistory.
Fairly early on though I decided I would need to set my disbelief to one side and just go with the flow if I wanted to derive any enjoyment from this book. Anthropologists will surely hurl this pot boiler across the room and issue indignant snorts at the notion that almost the entire human race was wiped out in 7,000 B.C. Furthermore, during the denouement, the tactics employed to thwart the villains are somewhat farcical when a simpler solution is staring us in the face!
But Cussler never intended to give us an accurate history lesson, and let's get onto the plot! This is a rollicking adventure where our rugged and handsome hero knocks the preverbial out of sinister foreigners with funny accents and discovers the lost continent of Atlantis, almost without breaking sweat. Dirk Pitt is definitely up there with Indiana Jones and James Bond and probably hasn't got far to go to give Superman a run for his money. He's the kind of mega-tough guy who, if his lungs start to hurt when the going gets tough, he spits them out and gets on with saving civilisation as we know it. He always has a witty line in repartee on his tongue too, and don't the ladies just lap it up! In real life he would probably come over as Leisure Suit Larry's more dangerous brother and would be regarded as rather corny by any streetwise modern woman. The womem in Dirk Pitt's world however are invariably beautiful and frequently in need of rescue by our invincible square-jawed hero, which, of course, he invariably accomplishes in the nick of time.
But enough irony and nitpicking! The action (and boy, is there plenty of that!) is very competently described and I defy anyone not to devour this hefty tome (500+ pages) in a flurry of undemanding but enjoyable page turning. I swear you will shiver as Cussler depicts the numbing effects of wind-chill on our hero!
So, classic literature this ain't, but I enjoyed it all the same and have no regrets about buying my first ticket into the rather simplistic but pretty damn entertaining world of Dirk Pitt.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on 17 March 2000
Hmmm. Well I bought this as an Amazon recommendation. It was a thoroughly enjoyableread, my first Cussler book. I don't know why but I'd assumed him to be a German WWII authour! Dirk Pitt is clearly one cool dude but if after reading the reviews this is one of his (and Cussler's)best I'm not going to rush out and buy the back list.
Don't get me wrong - its a good entertaining read for a "Clancy-man at heart" the characters are similar, have their foibles but hey, they're good honest men and true. I'd say, if you're new to Cussler, and like Clancy, buy it but as one of the reviewers says, wait for the paperback and/or buy Patrick Robinson's Nimitz Class in the meantime
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon 13 October 2010
As fictional global powerstruggles go, Atlantis Found serves up a particularly thrilling and entertaining one. You can't go wrong with Nazis, as Indiana Jones has proved. The action is shared out liberally between the NUMA team, albeit Dirk Pitt has the lion's share, and this approach allows Cussler to open up the plot, spreads out the action and allows parallel narratives to be played out. As with previous novels in the series a hearty suspension of disbelief is required - this is Bond-esque action and adventure with diabolical plans, daring action sequences and a sprinkling of romance. The only real disappointment is the title, a red herring, and if you're looking for a novel which is centrally around finding Atlantis then there are better choices, for here it's only ever upon the periphery of a cracking adventure yarn.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 1 March 2001
Clive Cussler's Atlantis Found is characteristic of so many of his novels being truly exciting and page-turning. The plot is wonderfuly masterminded and Dirk comes to the rescue in style as usual. You'll wish there was more! Enjoy.
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on 12 November 2014
With this 15th adventure of the character Dirk Pitt from 1999, Cussler wrote an exciting book which sucks the reader into the story step by step, yet the story consists almost only of action scenes. It is well written action and "bromance", yet this is not enough for a book which wants to tell about Atlantis.

Basically, "Atlantis" is used by Cussler only as a code word or cipher for an unexpected prehistoric society of world-wide range. So Plato's real Atlantis is actually not in scope. Cussler openly says this himself in chapter 25. Cussler's "Atlantis" looks like this: An old seafaring people, called the Amenes, settled on the coasts of the continents all over the world. The Amenes were almost totally extincted by the impact of a comet in approx. 7100 BC which provoked the flooding of all towns near the sea and an earth crustal shift. The survivors had installed all over the world several cave rooms with inscriptions, maps and obsidian skulls, in order to warn later generations before the return of a second comet. The capital city was situated in antarctica, now after the earth crustal shift under a thick layer of ice. Egyptians and Greeks were the successors of the Amenes. The important chapters about this are chapters 24, 25 and 43.

By this plot, Cussler reused some known pseudoscientific opinions in his novel. This is regrettable, since a good novel is charakterized by describing something possible, yet here we have long-since disproved theses. And it has almost nothing to do with Plato's Atlantis. Regularly, novels about Atlantis fail because of a lack of the right bite. The right bite would come from an appropriate connection of Plato's Atlantis with reality, yet in order to achieve this you have to go beyond what usual Atlantis searchers and usual Atlantis skeptics have to say. You would have to realize that Plato meant it all real, yet at the same time it is a distorted historical tradition. Find more about academic approaches towards Atlantis as a real place on the Web page Atlantis-Scout.

What is strange is, that Cussler connects the Atlantis topic and the Nazi topic as many authors do, but without really connecting them! It is not about the fact that certain Nazis (errorneously and pseudoscientifically) dreamt of Atlantis and the Atlanteans as their ancestors. It is only about some successors of old Nazis finding the heritage of the Amenes and trying to exploit it for their needs. Genetical engineering is done only with Hitler's DNA, not with DNA from any of the Amenes corpses. And concerning the ideology, we get to know almost nothing about the constitution of the Amenes people, so we do not know whether they favored something like the Nazi ideology, or not. No answer is an answer in this case, so we can well assume they did not.

Cussler also explicates more on the possibility of an earth crustal shift and talks about the danger that huge masses of shelf ice in antarctica could swim into the open sea and disturb the balance of the planet. By the way, Cussler also introduces into nano technology, yet this sounds somewhat dated, 15 years later. Cussler also introduces himself into the story, which is OK at first glance, but then he exaggerates his own role, which looks weird. Finally, Dirk Pitt decides to marry, which is surely an important step in the development of this character.
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on 15 September 2013
I understand that reviews on this kind of books are usually written by "aficionados",by dedicated fans of these authors and this kind of stories,which can be described by the phrase "....great hero saves world fighting under impossible odds".
So I am not likely to enthuse the fans,not just because I am not one of them.I do enjoy a frantic thriller ,but only under the proviso that the story,the plot,is ,at a minimum, vaguely credible.
This is the first Clive Cussler book I've ever read.So I can only speak about this particular book,not about the author,in general.
The story is extremely gripping,full of action,and the escalation well planned.The "hero"characters-Dirk Pitt mainly-are what they are expected to by.Almost superhuman in both mental and muscular prowess,fearless,witty,and ethically beyond even the slightest reproach.The bad guys are just that.Bad.Totally and unreservedly so.A 'family from hell',so to speak.The stakes,the highest possible.Civilisation and the human race itself,since only a couple of hundred thousand neo-nazis are set to survive the cataclysm.If Dirk Pitt fails,the world as we know it will cease to exist.
The set is ready for continuous thrills and action,especially if both yourself and your brains are on a holiday.Or if you are a seven year old who enjoys-and believes- "Marvel" cartoons.
For , not a single page goes by without a thrilling situation occuring,with one slight fault only.That it is both impossible and ludicrous.In every single case what is described is illogical,improbable ,and,most of all,ridiculous.I won't go into detail.Two facts only.The worlds greatest criminal organisation possesses the the mental abilities of a retard.They have created a colossal scheme to rule the world,they possess unlimited funds and resources,yet they act like cartoon characters both in terms of security and ability to prevent their plan from falling apart.Even the way they talk to each other is ridiculous,their dialogue being fit for small children.Second,the "heroes"who practically single-handedly save the day,are "Numa"executives ! Not NSA,CIA,DEA,DIA,FSB,MI-6,S.S,OAS,or any of the numerous intelligence organisations with ,literally ,hundreds of thousands of extremely-and very expensively-well trained operatives,as well as unlimited technical resources,but two guys from NUMA !!!An "oceanological"organisation !!
As far as I'm concerned,that is enough.I rest my case !!!
I do not say that the book is not enjoyable.If you do not think about the plot-at all-you may well enjoy it.But if you do,then better avoid the irittation.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 29 May 2013
Bought as a gift for my Dad, really enjoyed it. He loves Cussler's work and this was no exception. Will buy others in the series I'm sure
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on 11 August 2010
Atlantis Found features Dirk Pitt at his best for a long time. While it's a hefty read, it's filled with such entertaining character beats, ingenious machines and scenes, incredible set-pieces, and fearsomely dangerous perils that it has to go down as the most enjoyable Cussler I've read for years. Pitt and Giordino are at their charming but lethal best, and the bad guys are truly remarkable; lethal, cavalier and maniacal in the scope of their disregard for life, they're a lavishly created bond-villain's dream. What's more the settings used are terrific and hugely atmospheric. With a vast climax filled with fascinating scenes peppered with furious excitement and action it also has a very satisfyingly constructed climax. The evil plot is one of the best Cussler has ever come up with, and it has a feeling of true dread and menace, feeling like one of the hardest to try to beat that Dirk and Al have ever faced.
The challenges are huge. The bad guys are amazing. The settings, machines and set-pieces are astoundingly dramatic.
A truly epic adventure thriller.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
HALL OF FAMEon 27 November 2002
Mr. Cussler's books are great escapist fiction. His newest, "Atlantis Found", I believe is one of the better tales he has told. The other enjoyment that comes with a Cussler novel is watching the professional critics try to trash his work. They don't get it, but as these novels routinely make the best-seller lists, we, the readers, do. The critics do get it, but they prefer books that get the literary equivalent of an Academy Award, while Mr. Cussler takes home The People's Choice Award.

"Atlantis Found" is way over the top, fantastic in what is spread on its' 534 pages, and most importantly, it is pure fun, and a great read. Dirk Pitt and Al Giordino are a combination of, Indiana Jones, James Bond, The Saint, the members of the old and new Mission Impossible teams, and a dash of The Duke, John Wayne, leading the cavalry. Sure the book has its cliché's, but does not every Bond film as well? Mr. Cussler gives his readers what they enjoy, and what may be one person's cliché, is another's cue that he or she is about to embark on an adventure with old friends. If you read Mr. Cussler you have probably read well into this latest work, and if you are not yet amongst his readers, "Atlantis Found", is a good place to start.
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on 17 February 2001
I enjoyed this book, but ... I cannot believe that the simulation of ice floating from antarctica to sea will destabilize earth's rotation. Mass relocation (named to be the trigger) will occur differently, since everything in the water will displace the same weight of water, only the initial displacement will be inhomogenously. It tainted all my reading, knowing that even if the villains succeed, they will fail. It took me three evenings to get to page 389, but a month after that point of contradicting physics. First half is as good as usual. Second half is OK, but seems to be written in a hurry. Too much ideas, but too little logics. Good entertainment, enough ideas for three books, but I estimate it can be done better...
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