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55 of 55 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another hilarious episode in the Mole saga
The latest episode in the Adrian Mole story has arrived, and it is amazing how Sue Townsend manages to keep the story fresh and hilariously funny. This is not a book to read on a train or other public venue and I for one found myself laughing aloud and giggling with amusement as the twists and turns of this diary unfold. Mole's potential for disaster and embarrassment...
Published on 13 Nov. 2004 by Thomas Cunliffe

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Good Fun if You like Adrian Mole
To be honest you would have a job to pick this up and enjoy it if you had not read the whole set of books. The latest book The Prostrate years is much better if you want a 'standalone read' that is bang up to date.
This is a bit retro set in 2003 but if you were about 37 then like Adrian ( and me ) it is quite a chuckle.
Beware... he has turned into a sex...
Published on 8 Dec. 2010 by Gareth Jones - Unfortunately not -


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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Happy people don't keep a diary", 6 Nov. 2004
By 
Michael Daventry (London, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I wouldn't say "Adrian Mole and the WMD" is the best in the series yet, because they are all fantastically written novels; I'm sure future sequels will not disappoint.
In WMD, Adrian is face-to-face with the stressful issues of the modern day, be they credit card debt, terrorism or political correctness. His children are in far-flung countries and his parents have sold their house and moved to rebuild their lives, while he himself battles with a flock of beastly swans and a talking fridge. It's a beautifully-written novel, leaving you laughing out loud and saying to yourself "let me stay up an extra half-hour and find out how he gets out of this one".
It strikes me that one of the many secrets behind the success of the Mole series is that he has become increasingly detached from the character of Pandora. Crucially, she's not gone completely; there are several instances of continuity connections with the past. Is it any wonder how it easy it is for us to visualise Adrian Mole in real life?
Hats off to Sue Townsend - I was gripped, reading it in two days, nearly without putting it down. Buy it now.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Still Idealistic and Put upon!, 14 Oct. 2004
By 
A. Still "aliceestill" (Biggleswade, BEDS) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Sue Townsend's chronicles of the life of one A.A. Mole just keep getting better and better. After all that has happened to him over the years, one can't help but hope that maybe things will finally right themselves and that Adrian will live happily, if not ever after then at the very least for the foreseeable future.
Now working in an antiquarian and second hand bookstore (where he seems to have finally found his niche); running up huge debts due to the evils of store cards; acquiring a fiancee against his will and worrying about his son in the army, one can't help but wonder if he will ever get out of this one. Added to this is the saga of retrieving a deposit for a holiday cancelled due to fears about being bombed by an Iraqi weapon of mass destruction.
Throw in a bunch of swans, a pigsty conversion project; unflagging support for Tony Blair; the usual cast of old friends; and a light at the end of the tunnel, and you have another excellent book from Sue Townsend, certainly one you will want to read from cover to cover in one sitting.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars There should be a public warning not to read this book on a bus!, 11 Aug. 2010
Buy this book. The best and most hilarious installment in Townsend's saga. She surely has an ability to tune directly into your laughter ducts ( I don't know if "duct" is an appropriate word, but it should be 0_o) . The character "Marigold Flowers" , his newest love interest , is a genius comic creation to join the rest of the title charcters and the unforgettable protagonist. The novel is subtely moving towards the end which only adds to the deliciousness of it all and leaves you full up with belly laughter and tears. I wish I had Sue Townsend's mind.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One to read again and again, 16 Aug. 2010
Having read all but one of Adrian Mole's diaries, I can confidently say that this is by far the best.

It is very funny and, in parts, moving. While Adrian still has all of his classic characteristics - his inability to say 'no', his obsession with Pandora, his negativity - what makes this diary so great is the cast of characters beyond Mole and the regulars, most notably the incredible comic creations Marigold and Michael Flowers. The Flowers family members are both grotesque and recognisable, and I found myself re-reading the diary entries about them and laughing each time.

Townsend takes shots at, among other things, the UK's craze for organic health foods and culture of debt; things that most people who live in Britain have furrowed their brows over at some point. Even though Townsend takes swipes at the Iraq war in this book and there's a sense of outrage and sadness, it still somehow manages to be the most uplifting Mole diary, and he seems somehow a bit less pathetic in this diary than in the other ones.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Almost as good as the early books..., 1 Feb. 2010
By 
I was expecting this to be disappointing. i don't know why, so i was relieved and happy to find that the same old lovable loser i remembered from the first few books. Although not as laugh out loud funny as the first few installments i still found this book entertaining and enjoyed the social commentary, especially the sometimes heartbreaking letters and phone calls between Adrian and Glenn. It was a little close to home with Adrian and his money problems because (im sure like a lot of people nowadays) ive run up credit card bills - although i have to say i never got into the situation Adrian does paying out twice as much each month as he earns! However it is nice to see him doing a job he enjoys and i really loved the character of his new boss. Overall a really good book and although its nice to notice people and incidents from his past i think people who have not read any of the previous diarys will still be able to enjoy it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars As you like it!, 14 Dec. 2004
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If you have been following the series since the Eighties then you will want to know what happens to Adrian Mole et al in the noughties! Sue Townsend doesn't let the reader down with this hilarious journal of Adrian's 'Ups and Downs', mostly downs of course which is what we only expect of our anti-hero. All-round good read, from one of Britain's best contemporary writers. Well done Sue!
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The funniest book I own - but disappointing ending, 18 Mar. 2008
By 
Morena - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
Honestly, I have probably never laughed so much reading a book. Isn't that a terrible cliche? But true. Sue Townsend seems to have a direct tap to my funny bone. I'm so glad she continued to write Adrian Mole - the early books get funnier each time I read them now that I know more about the history and politics of the early 80s, but it's such a treat to have her give the 2000s the Adrian Mole treatment. Credit card debt, doing up old wrecks in the hope of making a fortune, old factories turned into overhyped apartment developments, Iraq... and her usual social themes.

Sue Townsend is the only satirist I can think of who has such fondness for her characters and their pathetic little world. Adrian himself is a prime example - how, how does she make such an idiot so very sympathetic? - and his boss Mr. Carlton-Hayes is nothing less than adorable - but when she wants to stick the knife in to a character, she really can; witness one Michael Flowers. Flowers is a sort of satire of the typically pompous fifty/sixty-something man devoid of all self-awareness, her in the guise of a New Age madrigal-singing despot. His daughter Marigold Flowers, too, is hilariously awful, once she's sucked Adrian in with her fragile wrists. Anyone who finds it hard to say 'no' will laugh with total recognition of how it is being dragged around by somebody they have nothing but ridicule for yet find strangley intimidating. I love the lines Pauline Mole puts into her son's mouth: "Ever since I was a little boy, I have preferred to live in the world of fiction. I have found the real world to be a harsh place. I avoid confrontation and am easily manipulated by people who have a strong sense of themselves". I love Pauline Mole, full stop, and she's on form in this book! The hapless, loyal Glenn and poor old Sharon are also as likeable and hilarious as ever - in the hands of another writer, Sharon would be all that is wrong with England and 'chav culture', whereas in Townsend's sympathetic hands, she springs off the page as a sort of ill-educated, well-meaning victim of circumstance as well as a very amusingly observed Miss Piggy type.

Also hilarious are the Leicestershire and Rutland Creative Writing Group scenes - Ken Blunt's hideously vulgar anti-Americana and Gladys' cat poems. I love when Sue Townsend puts poetry in her character's hands - I remember Barry Kent's privet hedge poem well!

My only criticism is that unlike any of the previous books, a serious happy ending and new start is given to Adrian, as Townsend rounds off the saga. No more yearning for Pandora. The Iraq part also gets more serious and ranty, which disturbs the comic tone; I'm not heartless, but I didn't think it fit with the tone of the rest of the book. I guess Adrian is finally allowed to grow up, and it's not in the reader's interest for him to do so.

Still, I feel silly even criticising Sue Townsend because I consider her an absolute master and satirical genius at what she does, and seemingly a very nice person too who writes with such heart. I firmly believe that if more people read Adrian Mole, the world would be a much better place!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars As good as ever, 8 Oct. 2004
I grew up reading about Mole and his pathetic life. I thought that Sue Townsend had stopped writing these books so I was pleasantly surprised to find that Mole is now back with even more problems and is just as funny as ever. This book made me laugh out loud.
Yet again Sue Townsend has written another superb book.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Middle-Aged Teen, 9 July 2014
Adrian Mole is 34 and on blundering his way into middle-age-dom. Divorced, and an absent parent to his two children who are as far-flung as Nigeria and Kuwait (where his teenage son Glenn is on military duty), he deals anew with the responsibilities of owning a new loft apartment he can't afford, and his daily troubles involve battling a group of swans from the canal his apartment faces, led by the most aggressive of the pack, whom he christens Gielgud. Sounds like Adrian's teenage dilemmas and insecurities when he was 13¾ are way way way behind him, right?

He is still smitten with his childhood sweetheart, the unattainable Pandora, who is now a politician and Labour MP. He flirts with Marigold Flowers, a customer at the small independent bookshop he is working at, and soon finds her to be a clingy and manipulative hypochondriac and tries unsuccessfully to ditch her, while falling for her older sister, the enigmatic Daisy. Meanwhile, he writes letters to celebrities like tabloid queen Jordan (in 2003 where this novel is situated) and David Beckham, in an attempt to secure interviews with them (at his convenience, no less) for his book, working title "Celebrities and Madness".

Against this frivolity that forms Adrian Mole's year-and-a-half in this installment, he has to deal with grittier issues like suddenly homeless parents who decide to live out on the fields of pig stys in (where else) the Piggeries in a hasty investment venture, real fear for his son Glenn, who gets caught up in the Iraq war, while Mole declares his undying support for Tony Blair's government, and quite vocally in a series of embarrassing letters. He also tries to keep his flagging bookclub alive while compounding his debt by signing up for more and more bank credit.

Those who have followed the Adrian Mole through his pimply youth would also recognise his BFF Nigel. In this book, Nigel becomes clinically blind, and feels like a sobering reference to Townsend's own blindness, diagnosed round the time of writing of this novel. It is commendable that she does not colour the account of Nigel's blindness with tragic overtones, but blends it into Adrian's story with darkly comic strokes.

Though raucously funny, I felt a tinge of sadness when I was reading Adrian's diary entries, not just at Townsend's recent passing, but because Adrian Mole is all grown-up agewise, but yet so beguilingly and identifiably inadequate as an adult. You worry that Adrian will never ever get his act together, and realise that even though he's a fictional character, you identify with him because he is the sum of all your worst fears about your adult self. At least you get to laugh about it, so maybe it won't be so bad.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thoroughly enjoyable., 2 Mar. 2006
I had just spent a week reading Vernon "God" Little, and it had been my second attempt at doing so. I found it a very difficult book to read, mainly due to the Texan references - I still don't know what a pumpjack is!
So when I finished I decided to go for something a little lighter....Adrian Mole, I'd read his first two books when I'd been at school, we were the same age and it felt a little like logging onto friends reunited and finding out how an old school mate was doing. I finished all 450 pages in just over a day.
Adrian's writing technique is pretty much the same as it was when he was 13, although he knows some bigger words now, and whilst he has always been rather self-opinionated, he has now turned into the self centred snob he had always been fated to be.
We find him in the midst of a never-ending spending spree, in a relationship that he doesn't want to be in, but can never call off and all this when his eldest son who has recently joined the army is posted to Kuwait, just as the second Gulf conflict is about to kick off.
Maybe I'm wrong, but I reckon this is probably the literary equivalent of a Soap opera, trashy voyeurism and very easy to keep track of. Saying that, I despise Soap operas, but this I could have kept reading this until Adrian collected his pension.
Brilliant stuff..
More please!
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Adrian Mole and the Weapons of Mass Destruction
Adrian Mole and the Weapons of Mass Destruction by Sue Townsend (Paperback - 7 Oct. 2004)
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