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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Enlightening. Scary, but very true to the facts
As a person very closely concerned with this particular brutal murder I found that Justins book threw a light onto a very dark subject. It brought to my attention how the whole security setup moulds together into a seamless state when it is necessary for the State to protect itself from attack or criticism of any kind.It is a great pity that these same agencies did not...
Published on 27 April 2006 by john brown

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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Trailing off
At first I thought "Oh great, this is just the book that will tie up all the loose ends, and give me insights which have so far been hidden" - despite having read a lot of stuff on the subject - and indeed it seemed extremely well researched, well written in an academic style (but pleasantly so, with lots of words used slightly out of context, like "a granulated...
Published on 13 April 2006 by helen


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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Enlightening. Scary, but very true to the facts, 27 April 2006
This review is from: Killing Finucane: The Inside Story of Britain's Intelligence War (Paperback)
As a person very closely concerned with this particular brutal murder I found that Justins book threw a light onto a very dark subject. It brought to my attention how the whole security setup moulds together into a seamless state when it is necessary for the State to protect itself from attack or criticism of any kind.It is a great pity that these same agencies did not pull together at a time when they could have saved lives here in NI rather than being indifferent in some cases to the unecessary loss of life, and in other cases actively working with the Paramilitaries to take life as in the case of Pat Finucane. His death was not just an attack upon a husband and a father but it was intended to intimidate any other advocate that might have the audacity to defend republicans in a Court of law.

There is a risk that this book is ignored because of the subject heading. That would be a travesty. Elements of the intelligence system who believe that they are above the law must be sent a clear message that that they are not so protected. This book explores the heart of the intelligence network and shows how it can use its powers to corrupt and criminalise certain agents whilst outwardly professing to uphold the law. Justin O Brien is to be saluted for this work. It is not only for academics. It should be read by everyone who wishes to understand how such things can happen.

Investigative journalism has in recent years opened doors normally shut to exclude the general public and has shone a bright light of discovery into some of the murkiest corners of the state. This book does just that. Justin is to be congratulated and his courage admired. I thoroughly enjoyed it and I would recommend it to everyone.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Trailing off, 13 April 2006
This review is from: Killing Finucane: The Inside Story of Britain's Intelligence War (Paperback)
At first I thought "Oh great, this is just the book that will tie up all the loose ends, and give me insights which have so far been hidden" - despite having read a lot of stuff on the subject - and indeed it seemed extremely well researched, well written in an academic style (but pleasantly so, with lots of words used slightly out of context, like "a granulated account"). But then.... it seemd to loose it more and more and didn't come together. The murder of Rosemary Nelson which the author promises repeatedly to bring into the wider range of events is barely touched upon and indeed, the intention of looking into Finucane's killing "in context" seems to get forgotten as the narrative proceeds. I'm not knocking this book - quite the opposite, it is full of important detail, but seeing he had such ambitious aims, the author seems keen to finish his account somewhat prematurely.
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Killing Finucane: The Inside Story of Britain's Intelligence War
Killing Finucane: The Inside Story of Britain's Intelligence War by Justin O'Brien (Paperback - 1 May 2005)
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