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4.0 out of 5 stars An informed book with excellent photographs
An informed book packed with Ponting's grand and mighty or mundane and touching photographs. An excellent place to start for those coming to the story of Scott's final expedition for the first time. With enough small background details and stories to bring the men involved to life. the author does have an annoying tendency to try 'interpreting' parts of Scott's...
Published on 10 Oct 2000

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Misses the mark
This is something of a scrapbook thanks to the author/editor's interjections. The main text is the heavily edited 'school reader' version of Scott's journals (although there doesn't appear to be any mention made of this, so an innocent might assume that this is the full work).

There are one or two amateurish errors in Beryl Bainbridge's Foreword (e.g. contrary...
Published on 18 Dec 2007 by Vinyl obsessive


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Misses the mark, 18 Dec 2007
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This review is from: Scott's Last Journey: The Race for the Pole (Hardcover)
This is something of a scrapbook thanks to the author/editor's interjections. The main text is the heavily edited 'school reader' version of Scott's journals (although there doesn't appear to be any mention made of this, so an innocent might assume that this is the full work).

There are one or two amateurish errors in Beryl Bainbridge's Foreword (e.g. contrary to her assertion, Bowers did not subscribe £1,000 to the expedition funds).

The oddest thing about this book, though, is that Peter King devotes the greater part of his introduction to the unhappy fate of the Ross Sea (Aurora) party involved in Shackleton's later and abortive 1914 expedition, rather than dealing with Scott 1910-12. It seems incongruous.

Perhaps understandably this book appears to have been 'remaindered' at an early stage and, as suggested by the first reviewer, it might be worth picking up at a cheap price for Ponting's photos.
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4.0 out of 5 stars An informed book with excellent photographs, 10 Oct 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Scott's Last Journey (Hardcover)
An informed book packed with Ponting's grand and mighty or mundane and touching photographs. An excellent place to start for those coming to the story of Scott's final expedition for the first time. With enough small background details and stories to bring the men involved to life. the author does have an annoying tendency to try 'interpreting' parts of Scott's diaries, which in all honesty, speak well enough for themselves if you remember they were his day-to-day thoughts with all their petty upsets and greviences and not meant for publication in such an unedited form. Otherwise an involving and facinating read and the photographs are worth the price on their own.
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2.0 out of 5 stars What a muddle, 16 Mar 2014
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This review is from: Scott's Last Journey: The Race for the Pole (Hardcover)
I found this to be a real muddle of a book.

Published in 1999, the book consists of a version of Robert Falcon Scott's diary which was found on his body in 1912, following his death with 4 companions on his return from the South Pole. The diary is interspersed by a series of Herbert Ponting's superb photographs as well as an annotated commentary by Peter King, who describes himself as the book's editor.

I have to say that having read Scott's diary previously, I purchased the book for two reasons. Firstly for Ponting's photographs and secondly because having originally retailed for £20, it was freely available on Amazon for pennies. Those photographs have since been made available in another publication alongside Hurley's photographs of the Shackleton's Transantarctic expedition (The Heart of the Great Alone - 2011) , but if you want to see Ponting cheaply, then this book may still be worth buying.

But in my view, that is all it is worth buying for. I found King's annotated commentary totally unedifying and rather an irritant. It purports to enable the reader to gain a balanced view of Scott's merits or otherwise as an explorer, but in fact relies heavily on Roland Huntford's assassination of Scott, as published in his 1979 work (Scott and Amundsen). The commentary constantly repeats Huntford's assertions and rather ignores the context of Scott's journey. Sentences beginning with 'perhaps' or 'possibly' abound which are the precursor for King to offer his own opinion on an issue. On at least two occasions he also takes Scott's son, Sir Peter Scott to task in a way which I found quite irrelevant.

The book has two further odd elements. It begins with a Foreword by Beryl Bainbridge. This is taken from elsewhere and was not written for this book. I find that not surprising since sits rather uneasily with much of King's commentary. Had Ms Bainbridge read King's volume when she allowed her writing to be used? Secondly King has provided an Introduction to his book which is nothing about Scott's Last Journey and all about Shackleton's later Transantarctic Expedition. What is that all about?

This is more a scrapbook than a serious work. For those for whom the story of Scott is new, I suggest you enjoy the photos, take the commentary with a pinch of salt and read something else - David Crane's 'Scott of the Antarctic' (2005) will give you the balanced perspective which King mischievously suggests his own volume provides. Also read the diary itself, readily available in the Oxford World Classics series.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating photography accompanying the well-known tragic endeavours of Captain Scott and his men., 16 Oct 2010
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Paul Harris (Llantrisant, Wales) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Scott's Last Journey (Hardcover)
Very well presented book. The well known story is of course enthralling and emotional. The many quality photographs make this especially fascinating.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The last word..., 7 Feb 2010
By 
Paul S. Hyett (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Scott's Last Journey: The Race for the Pole (Hardcover)
Indeed I believe this is the last word in putting Captain Scott's own story into print, accompanied as it is with Herbert Ponting's superb images.
Here you have the story as told by Captain Scott in his own journal. Written while undertaking this endeavour step by step, surely this is as close as we are going to get to what actually happened. To interpret these words from our "celebrity of nothing" culture is to fall extremely short.
Scott was an "officer and a gentleman" something I really do not think we'll understand from today's viewpoint. Scott was exploring not racing. He'd been there before with Shackleton and polar exploration was completely different from kitting out solely for speed and nothing more. Sure Amundsen got there first but what did he bring back with him other than the fact that he'd got there?
Also, if it really was a race then it was very unequal. When Scott started his journey on the 1st November 1911, Huntford tells us, Amundsen was already 200 miles ahead! What sort of race was that? Also, Amundsen had already camped 60 miles closer than Scott in the first instance and had used the deception that he was going north to gain an unsurmountable advantage.
This is a great book, it puts the record straight by giving us the record - as it stands - without any axe grinding, tub thumping, or egotism.
Just superb.
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Scott's Last Journey: The Race for the Pole
Scott's Last Journey: The Race for the Pole by Peter King (Hardcover - 1 Nov 1999)
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