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on 18 September 2004
Topical but never anachronistic, Ms Kael's essays and reviews place me in an position any true movie lover will appreciate - to have one's views on movies simultaneously energised and challenged. That I have not seen all the movies Pauline Kael writes about hardly seems to matter. If anything my cinematic blind spots allow an even greater appreciation of her skills as a writer. Punchy yet eloquent, Kael's writing is infused with both an irrepressible sense of excitement about movies and an unsurpassed critical insight. In this early volume of her work, Kael exhibits a sense of foreboding about the future of film. This gloomy outlook would eventually subside with the seismic changes brought about by the New Hollywood of the late 60s and 70s. Nevertheless, her concern about the place of movies in popular culture, the vacuity of certain abstract cinematic approaches, and what might be termed 'post modernist' film criticism remain valid to this day. Kael was feared and reviled by studio executives of the 70s for her unprecedented power to make or break a picture. This collection presents a chance to read Kael's writings prior to her subsequent elevation to the status of 'super-critic'. However, the reasons behind her eventual critical stature are abundantly evident throughout.
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on 18 September 2004
Topical but never anachronistic, Ms Kael's essays and reviews place me in an position any true movie lover will appreciate - to have one's views on movies simultaneously energised and challenged. That I have not seen all the movies Pauline Kael writes about hardly seems to matter. If anything my cinematic blind spots allow an even greater appreciation of her skills as a writer. Punchy yet eloquent, Kael's writing is infused with both an irrepressible sense of excitement about movies and an unsurpassed critical insight. In this early volume of her work, Kael exhibits a sense of foreboding about the future of film. This gloomy outlook would eventually subside with the seismic changes brought about by the New Hollywood of the late 60s and 70s. Nevertheless, her concern about the place of movies in popular culture, the vacuity of certain abstract cinematic approaches, and what might be termed 'post modernist' film criticism remain valid to this day. Kael was feared and reviled by studio executives of the 70s for her unprecedented power to make or break a picture. This collection presents a chance to read Kael's writings prior to her subsequent elevation to the status of 'super-critic'. However, the reasons behind her eventual stature are abundantly evident throughout.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

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