Customer Reviews


16 Reviews
5 star:
 (8)
4 star:
 (7)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


24 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Engels: Communist, Revolutionary, Factory Manager, "General", Huntsman, Writer, Feminist and All Round Sound Bloke
This is a fine, readable biography of Friedrich Engels in a similar vein to Francis Wheens Karl Marx but not such a virtuso performance. It more than competently covers Engels rich and varied life, anchoring it in the context of his times, as he journeys from his birth place in Germany to exile in London with more than a few points in between. The tone of the book is...
Published on 25 July 2009 by S Wood

versus
14 of 21 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars too many snide remarks
Young historian obviously going places,TV broadcaster, regular articles in the Guardian and Murdoch's The Times has produced a well researched and sometimes amusing biography of Engels, Marx's mentor and supporter - in financial and other ways.
Enjoyed reading it as Mr Hunt has a way with words and captures the times he describes very well indeed. My main complaint...
Published on 27 Sep 2009 by Craddock Edwards from Bristol


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

24 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Engels: Communist, Revolutionary, Factory Manager, "General", Huntsman, Writer, Feminist and All Round Sound Bloke, 25 July 2009
By 
S Wood (Scotland) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Frock-Coated Communist: The Revolutionary Life of Friedrich Engels (Hardcover)
This is a fine, readable biography of Friedrich Engels in a similar vein to Francis Wheens Karl Marx but not such a virtuso performance. It more than competently covers Engels rich and varied life, anchoring it in the context of his times, as he journeys from his birth place in Germany to exile in London with more than a few points in between. The tone of the book is generally sound, and not infrequently quite funny - as is Engels. . . and Marx for that matter. There is an element of finger wagging on Hunts part about some of Engels real or alleged misdemeanours, but I rather think M.A. Krul in his above (or below?) review is being rather too sensitive in regarding this as "hostility" towards Engels on Tristram Hunts part.

The philosophical roots and theory of Marxism are clearly explained for those of us, like myself, who are a little light on the nitty gritty of Marxist theory. Developments in Engels wide intellectual interests are giving room as well as his copious writings on issues as diverse as Communism, Science, Feminism, Family and Warfare. His relationship with Marx recieves ample coverage and it is evident from this, and other books Ive read, that they got on like a house on fire: writing to each another daily and when they were both in London they visited each other daily aswell (and this despite Marxs perpetual cadging!). When Marx died Engels looked after his intellectual, aswell as his biological, offspring.

I was sorry that the book had to end which is always a good sign, and while there are a few quibbling problems with the book (which could have done with being polished up a little) I wouldnt hesitate to reccommend it to anyone whether or not they are ideologically committed, or even sympathetic, to Socialism.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


30 of 38 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Informative biography of Engels marred by editorial line, 11 May 2009
By 
M. A. Krul (London, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Frock-Coated Communist: The Revolutionary Life of Friedrich Engels (Hardcover)
Tristram Hunt's biography of the great man nicknamed 'The General', the Communist hero Friedrich Engels, is timely in light of the slow revival of Marxism as a consequence of the failure of neoliberalism and the current financial crisis. That is not to say that this is the first English-language biography; besides the old standard biography by Gustav Mayer (Friedrich Engels) there is the excellent short(er) biography by J.D. Hunley (Friedrich Engels: A Reinterpretation of His Life and Thought), in addition to several others.

Hunt's book is of the more contemporary biographies however the most informative one. His command of sources is excellent, and he uses not just the by now familiar memoirs and the manuscripts from that time, but also makes great use of third party sources that are not directly about Engels but which shed a greater light on certain circumstances he lived in or people he knew. Hunt is also very good on providing a general historical background; in particular his descriptions of the shades of German romanticism and their influence as well as the Manchester environment of Engels as factory manager are very well done. These are not likely to be surpassed in English soon. Overall, Hunt's work is fairly balanced with regard to the different aspects and periods of Engels' life, with the interesting observation that unlike almost all prior biographers, he focuses in particular on Engels' private life and activities as industrialist, rather than on the political activities and theory.

In addition to this, Hunt is very critical of both Marx and Engels, which combined with the above give in a certain way a refreshing look at the man as a historical person with his own flaws and downsides. Indeed it is not easy to make an amiable, open-minded and committed progressive as Engels look bad, but Hunt has done his best. This is also the main downside of the book: perhaps it is because of the author's New Labour background, but although he is fair to Engels with regard to many of the clichéd criticisms (that he had betrayed Marxism by falsely popularizing it, or that he was responsible for Stalin, or that he didn't understand Marx himself), Hunt's recurring bouts of hostility toward his subject are somewhat of a stylistic sore. More annoying is the irrelevant lecturing he undertakes regularly towards Engels, whom he tries very hard to depict as a hypocrite and a failure at Communism for not making his lifestyle and personal predilections up to the standard of what Hunt presumably thinks a Communist should really be like (which seems to be extremely austere, fanatically consistent in every aspect of life, and active in nothing but revolutionary politics - oddly enough a perfect description of Lenin, something that presumably hasn't occurred to Hunt!). This editorial line adds nothing to the content of the book, and subtracts from the enjoyment of the otherwise informative and balanced portrayal of Engels' life. As a minor complaint, one can also add that Hunt occasionally repeats some old myths about Marx and Engels that have long been debunked but are too often still received opinion: for example the idea that Marx and Engels never liked real workers when they met them, or that they were mean to the noble Bakunin. These have been well refuted in the excellent 'intellectual biography' of Marx and Engels' politics by Hal Draper: Karl Marx's Theory of Revolution: State and Bureaucracy Pt. 1 (2 Volumes in 1). Usually Hunt is good at evading these traps though, for example in his correct explanation of how Marx & Engels switched from initially supporting the imperialism of greater powers towards smaller ones (or colonies) as the 'march of history' to opposing them under practically all circumstances.

Recommended to read together with the Draper series and Hunley's biography.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An Excellent Book Written with Great Clarity and Wit, 14 Sep 2010
By 
Dr. R. Brandon (England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Frock-Coated Communist: The Revolutionary Life of Friedrich Engels (Hardcover)
This is a very well written, entertaining and straightforward book about Engels; his domestic life, his relationship with Marx and the philosophical basis of their works.
The author, Hunt, charts the early life of Engels in the Rhineland manufacturing town of Barmen and his privileged beginnings as the son of a wealthy mill owner. Engels rejected his early Romanticism and lost his Christian faith as he took in the conditions around him and studied the revolutionary changes that had taken place in Europe, particularly the French revolution and the progress of the industrial revolution in England. During his time at Berlin University Engels became a committed adherent of the fashionable Hegelian philosophy being taught at the time and this was to profoundly effect the work of Engels and Marx. Hunt makes a good job of explaining the philosophy of Hegel. In a line; Hegel proposed the inevitable development in society of the 'spirit' or self-conscious reason, the only true reality, and that the idea of freedom constituted the final goal of that 'spirit'. Whereas teachers of the time thought that 'final state' had been achieved in Germany, Engels and Marx reasoned that capitalism with its use of employed labour meant that could not be the case. In practical or 'material' terms employed people were not free and further social development must yet take place.
Hunt goes on to describe Engels' move to Manchester as an employee of his father's firm, his observations of the effects of advanced industrialisation and the publication of many articles expressing his political views. It was at this time that Engels wrote his classic, "The Condition of the Working Class in England" when he was just 24 and which was published the following year in 1845 in Leipzig. It was the coincidence of ideas that led to the meeting of Engels and Marx in the summer of 1844 and their lifelong collaboration. Marx and Engels hoped for much in the revolutionary turmoil of 1848 but later settled into the routine of Engels earning money to support the endless research undertaken by Marx in the British Library and the ever increasing demands upon Engels of the Marx family.
Following the death of Marx in 1883 Hunt deals with Engels own work on what has become known as 'dialectical materialism'. This is the weakest section of the book, perhaps because this is a flawed pseudo-science in any case, and some clarity is lost. Finally the author reviews the perennial question as to whether the Soviet Union and the policies of Stalin represent a true interpretation of the philosophy expounded by Marx and translated into practical terms by Engels. An excellent book written generally with great clarity and wit.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


11 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Engels: Marx`s Joint Venture Partner in their Communist enterprise, 19 May 2009
By 
CM Weston (Warsaw) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Frock-Coated Communist: The Revolutionary Life of Friedrich Engels (Hardcover)
This is a hugely enjoyable biography of the man and his times. The book is light on ideology although the sections on the predecessors to the Communist ideal ie Saint - Simon and Charles Fourier and his "Theory of the Four Movements", were interesting. Apart from the picture of Engels as the champagne drinking (although he preferred his bottle of Holsten), horsehunting, bon viveur with an eye for the ladies, the real core of the book is his longtime collaboration with Marx and his own contribution to the development of Marxism.
Despite a cool beginning at the start of the relationship, the Marx - Engels friendship and collaboration lasted for almost forty years. During this time, Engels was providing critical financial support to Marx and his family - even after Marx`s death, as well as penning a number of newspaper articles for Marx to claim as his own and receive the financial benefit thereof! There is one letter referred to in which Marx is chivvying Engels to quickly prepare a newspaper article for Marx in order for Marx to meet an editorial deadline, while at the same time Engels is working full time in his father`s Manchester cotton business.
The book refers to Engel`s own contribution to Marxism. Engels was only 24 when he penned "The Condition of the English Working Class" - a book which Marx praised long after. Engels was Marx`s "inside man" in the capitalist system and Marx undoubtedly relied on him for guidance on its workings for his own writings. One of Marx`s weaknesses was his inability to complete some of his researches - only the first volume of his famous "Capital" had ben published by his death. It fell to Engels to assemble and edit the two posthumous volumes of "Capital" as well as to guard the intellectual legacy of his old friend.
Engels also penned "The Dialectics of Nature" and "Origins of the Family" - the former much referred to by Lenin and Plekhanov. Engels therefore can make a full claim to being a key founder of Marxism.
As part of the book`s introduction, the author refers in passing to his visit to Engels - a crumbling, post Soviet town of Engels nestling on the Volga but he should have stayed in Moscow - diagonally opposite the Church of Christ the Saviour (famously dynamited by Stalin`s regime in the 1930s and now rebuilt) and just across from one of the plushest restaurants of modernday Moscow stands a large statue in memory to Engels - the "Frock Coated Communist" himself. I sense that Engels would have enjoyed this particular irony.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Second fiddle perhaps, but an essential player, 4 Aug 2012
By 
Ralph Blumenau (London United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is an attractive biography of Friedrich Engels. If his life is less well known than that of Marx, Engels would not complain - over and over, from his first meeting with Marx in 1844, he stressed with genuine modesty that Marx was the genius to whom he played second fiddle. His admiration of Marx, his staunch friendship, his financial generosity to him and his family (even including those of them who were shameless spongers) are all selfless. Hunt makes it clear, though, how enormously important his intellectual contributions to Marxism were, how tirelessly he did research for Marx, how they discussed their ideas with each other almost daily - by letter when Engels was living in Manchester and Marx in London, and by daily visits when Engels moved to London himself, a short distance away from Marx's home.

The book sets the ideas of Marx and Engels very fully into the historical context and into that of other kinds of socialism, and Engels certainly shared Marx's combativeness towards the exponents of rival theories. That is all pretty well known to anyone who is interested in Marxist theory. But I found less familiar material in the last two chapters. These cover Engels' interest in science, technology, Darwinian evolution, all of which he tried to fit into the framework of dialectical materialism. They deal with Engels' analysis of the subjection of women in economic terms: their to-be-desired liberation, like that of the proletariat, would result from the private property (of men) being eventually replaced by a more communistic society, with the family disappearing as an economic unit. But he had little sympathy for the women's movement, regarding it as a distraction from the class struggle. They show how Engels, like Marx, had originally seen war as a catalyst for revolution, but how in the 1890s Engels came to dread it: it would fill the workers with chauvinism, and, though revolution might come at the end if it, the price would be too high. To prevent it, he urged that mass conscription made it possible for socialism to infiltrate the armies and turn them against their officers, and it would prevent the army being used to crush the workers.

Hunt credits Engels' "Anti-Dühring" of 1877 with being more influential in spreading Marxist theory than Marx's own bulky "Kapital". In it he criticized Dühring for, among other things, envisaging the peaceful development of Socialism. But towards the end of his life, Engels softened the rigidities of Marxist theory: in his 1886 Preface of the first English edition of "Das Kapital" he thought that perhaps in some countries socialism might be reached by peaceful parliamentary means; and the success of the German Socialist Party at the 1890 reinforced that idea. (Hunt does not mention that Marx himself had expressed such a view as early as 1872, though only in a private letter.)

Engels was a wealthy businessman in Manchester between 1849 and 1869 when his partners bought him out for the equivalent today of £1.2m. His wealth was of course based on being a capitalistic employer. He saw no problem in this, since he used his wealth to advance socialism. Nor was there anything austere in his life-style - he was a bon viveur, a rider to hounds and a womanizer (though I found his relationship first with Mary Burns, an uneducated Irish working-class girl and, after her death, with her even less educated sister Lizzie rather touching). He had a great capacity to make people love him, and must have been, I think, a warm-hearted and very attractive person. And a happy one - more so as in his last years he felt that Marxism was really making progress.

Hunt ends with an Epilogue in which he asks how uch responsibility Engels (and for that matter Marx) have to bear for the horrors perpetrated by Lenin and Stalin who proclaimed themselves his disciples. He acquits them: Engels and Marx were far too humanist, both too outraged by the immiseration of the working class for them not to be horrified by the miseries inflicted on the workers by the forced industrialization in communist states. Their aim was to set the people free - not to make them slaves of the state.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


14 of 21 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars too many snide remarks, 27 Sep 2009
By 
Craddock Edwards from Bristol (bristol, uk) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Frock-Coated Communist: The Revolutionary Life of Friedrich Engels (Hardcover)
Young historian obviously going places,TV broadcaster, regular articles in the Guardian and Murdoch's The Times has produced a well researched and sometimes amusing biography of Engels, Marx's mentor and supporter - in financial and other ways.
Enjoyed reading it as Mr Hunt has a way with words and captures the times he describes very well indeed. My main complaint is that the book is ruined by rather silly and sometimes pointless snide remarks. For example - how can you accuse Engels of not being a Communist? The philosophy was still being put together by friend Karl during most of Engel's lifetime, how could he be something that did not yet really exist? Also having read a lot of Marx and Engels to say nothing of Lenin and others, I cannot recall any of them saying a person could not enjoy a drink or a good meal - what they did say however was they felt that everyone should have these opportunities and not just the economically favoured few. Although I must agree that Engels's frequent encounters with less reputable ladies of the night, when he was a young rake about Paris and other cities, were a bit out of order if we must judge him by modern moral standards.
As 'Capital' is now being looked at in a different light and even serious historians are realising Marx and Engels were not responsible for Stalin and Pol Pot (bit like saying Jesus was responsible for all the terror carried out in the name of religion) the basic tenants of Marxism especially the economic ones, are being studied in a fresh and hopefully a less hostile manner.
This book will not help those wishing to study the theory of Socialism and Communism but it does give a very colourful insight into the life and times of the principal personalities. To be read in conjunction with Frances Wheens's excellent biography of Karl Marx.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Written with Feeling, 22 July 2011
By 
G. Edwards "Ned" (Wales) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Not very often do I read a book that I am reticent to put down. This is such a book. Hunt writes with clarity clearly drawn from in depth research that is a joy to examine. Hunt gives a colourful yet meticulous history of the relationship between Engels and Marx; the background leading up their meeting, followed by their socio-ploitical philosophy and its development as they strove for a true socialist society. Each man's character is explained with precise reference to their families, peers and friends. A book for the Marxist enthusiast and the historian alike. A rare treat!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A secret Life, 26 Jun 2011
This biography of Engels doesn't have the panache of a writer such as Francis Wheen (biographer of Marx). Ironically, Hunt plays second fiddle to Wheen as a writer but his mission is to foreground Engels in his partnership with Marx and emphasize the huge contribution he made to the published volumes of work by Marx and his journalism.
Engels also had a fascinating life, in that he seems to have had to maintain a doubleness and a secret side throughout his career. Having somewhat reluctantly ended up in Manchester as part of the English half of a German family cotton business he maintains a significant facade of respectability by day, whilst by night he was a revolutionary socialist steeped in letters, writing and meetings to promote the cause. His business dealings were also by default a cash cow for the ever poverty stricken Marx whose daily begging letters were always sympathetically dealt with. Indeed, Engels was seen as a soft touch by many leeches throughout his life and rarely failed to provide financial assistance. For Marx he would seemingly do anything, including lending his name and reputation to an illegitimate son of Marx- the result of a dalliance with the family maid. Engels also had an eye for the ladies but his long term relationships were with illiterate Mancunian female factory workers- notably Mary Burns and later her sister Lizzy who he finally married when on her death bed. Hunt isn't able to explain the dynamics of these relationships but concedes that Engels laid himself open to criticism as an exploiter of the working classes himself. Even here, Engels had to house his partners in different addresses and maintain a level of secrecy so his family would not disown him. The women themselves seem ciphers and its a shame Hunt hasn't dug up more about them but maybe the sources aren't there.
The secret side of Engels combines well with the political theorizing and the huge range of interests, (both intellectual and social) that helped him live life at a seemingly furious pace. All in all his life was amazing enough and Hunt could hardly go wrong with such material but its to his credit that he treats his subject with respect whilst also recognizing his faults and pecadillos. Wheens biography of Marx is a tour de force. This book is quieter, less showy and occasionally judgemental but always entertaining and fascinating in providing a portrtait of European politics or the terrible conditions that initially afflicted Victorian Manchester. Hunts title focusses on the doubleness that was a feature of the life of Engels and also gives us some sense of the man- a joker, a social being, a caring and perceptive man and an opposite to the hypochondriac, distracted,poverty afflicted and slightly haunted Marx. A good read and I agree with any other reviewer who recommends reading back to back with Wheens masterwork.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


12 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating - really timely, 30 April 2009
This review is from: The Frock-Coated Communist: The Revolutionary Life of Friedrich Engels (Hardcover)
I bought this book for my father (who's a history nut) but ended up reading it myself. I studied history so am quite a harsh judge but have to say I really enjoyed this. Hunt writes really well and he's got a cracking story on his hands. Anyone wanting to understand how we got to where we are today should read this book - it couldn't be more relevant. If I'm honest I did have a couple of tiny quibbles but that's the whole point of a book like this - to get you thinking. There aren't many historical biographies that do that and there aren't many that are as good a read as this. Well worth having on your shelf.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Frock-Coated Communist The Revolutionary Life of Friedrich Engels, 28 Jun 2009
By 
T. Jones - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Frock-Coated Communist: The Revolutionary Life of Friedrich Engels (Hardcover)
The Frock-Coated Communist The Revolutionary Life of Friedrich Engels
Tristam Hunt

It is not possible to overestimate the social and political impact Friedrich Engels has had by virtue of his culturing communism through his own life experiences and collaboration with Karl Marx. Not only did he built his life long campaign on first hand experience of the class divide but together with Marx forged the communist manifesto and funded him in his scholarly work culminated in Marx's publication of Das Kapital. Given that a third of the world at one time was under the influence of communism the historical status of Engels is without much competition. Without Lancashire in England where Engels experienced and reported on raw industrial capitalism it is said that there would have been no Soviet Union and the twentieth cent century would have been very different.

Engels was born in 1820 into a Prussian, Calvinistic merchant class family. While on military service in Berlin he attended lectures in social philosophy which at the time in Germany was focusing on the unrest over the autocratic, ultra conservative Prussian regime. Much of the discussion was highly academic revolving over whether or not Hegel was right. Unfortunately the reader has difficulty appreciating what this was all about and one was anxious to get on with the main plot. Suffice to say however that in 1830's Germany socialistic concepts were already being developed and communism ideas were being exposed by Moses Hess in his book published in 1837. Marx was at that time a radical editor of a Rhineland newspaper but pressure by the Prussian authorities resulted in him having to move to Paris which following the aftermath of the French Revolution, was a far more politically alive environment.

Engels's involvement in social unrest in Germany and a reaction to this by the authorities resulted in his family's social and commercial discomfort. Consequently he was sent at the age of 22 to work in a cotton manufacturing company based in Manchester in England in which his farther was a partner. This was a seminal move in that it exposed Engels to both world of capitalism in that the company was manufacturing and operating in a chain of world trade involving the Southern States of America and India. Indeed his experience of global capitalism worked its way into the pages of Marx's Das Kapital. In needs to be understood than when Engels arrived in Manchester in 1842, this first industrial city was being seen as a big experiment. By the time of his arrival the industrial revolution in the North West of England had already been on-going for some hundred years and social migration and over crowding in the name of money making was resulting in major unrest. The book describes the scene well and how there were already in place social movement under the utopian themes of Robert Owen; the Owenites and later the Chartists. One learns how well attended were the weekly meeting of crowds of informed workers seeking a way out of the social mire.

The major step change came when, through intimacy with Mary Burn of an Irish Imigrant family; a people who were at the bottom of the social pile, Engels was introduced to the social casualties of capitalism and industrialization. Without Mary he would not have been able to go amongst the proletariat and experience at first hand their conditions.

And what did the middle classes think of this wretched state of society? " I once went into Manchester with such a bourgeois, and spoke to him of the bad, unwholesome method of building the frightful condition of the working people's quarters, and said to him I have never seen so ill-built s city. The man listened quietly to the end, and said at the corner where we parted: "And yet there is a great deal of money made here; good morning sir"
Ideally one should read this biography of Engels after reading his account of what he observed in Manchester in: The Conditions of the Working Class in England first published in 1845 in German. The shame of the English that this was not published for the British market until 1892. In 1844 Engels spent 10 days with Marx in Paris which laid the grounds for the Communist Manifesto published in 1848. In effect, the earlier theoretical work of Moses Hess combined with Engels witnessing the human injustice in industrial Manchester became the mainstream of Marxist thinking and it was in Paris that Marx underwent his final intellectual transformation. The Paris meeting set a collaborative friendship that was to last 40 years. The Manifesto opens with such resounding words: A spectre is haunting Europe-the spectre of Communism" and ends: "The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have the world to win. WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNRIES UNITE" Engels clearly brought into the Manifesto an account of the emergence of the proletariat, "a class of laborers, who live as long as they find work and find work only as long as their labor increases capital"

The book describes the social uprising in mainland Europe in the late 1840's but this did not carry through to a lasting revolutionary change. "Europe failed to turn." Over the following 20 years while Engels remained in Manchester he and Marx corresponded daily and these were the golden years of their writing. Engels made capitalist money which he used to fund Maarx and his family in London. He even pilfered the company's till to give money to Marx. Engels enjoyed a high social life in Manchester epitomized by his riding to hounds with the Cheshire Hunt. So ironically the very evils that the both had so successfully derided funded their lifestyles. In 1870 Engels sold his interests in the company and retired and went to live in London to be nearer to Marx and in some spender and comfort in a house next to Regent's park. During these years, after the failed revolution in Europe, Marx and Engels seemed to have been alone in continuing the cause of communism which only transformed itself into socialist movements at the end of the century and with it a lot of political in fighting. Of course the culmination was the Russian Revolution and that country's adoption of their manifesto. Marx died in 1883 and Engels 1895.

Tristum Hunt has written a very human account of Engels's life and his relationship with Marx. Certainly it was full of paradox of life styles. The author has dwelt a little too long on philosophical issues. Never the less he has captured the life of one of the most influential men on happens during the twentieth century.

.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The Frock-Coated Communist: The Revolutionary Life of Friedrich Engels
Used & New from: £7.31
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews